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Download Pudd'nhead Wilson: A Tale by Mark Twain Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Puddnhead Wilson: A Tale by Mark Twain (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 53.85 out of 5 3.85 (34 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Richard Henzel Publisher: Big Happy Family Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2006 ISBN:
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Pudd'nhead Wilson, like many other Mark Twain books, was read aloud by the author to his wife and daughters, chapter by chapter, as it was being written.

This humorous, dramatic, and sometimes shocking novel, set in the pre-war south, is the tale of Roxy, a beautiful and intelligent slave woman who contrives to save her own light-skinned child from being sold down the river. She successfully switches her baby with the master's own child, starting a chain of events that lead to surprising and tragic results.

This book is considered by many to be Mark Twain's best book dealing with the cruelty, horror, and inhumanity of slavery in 19th century America. Pudd'nhead, the title character, not only provides humorous aphorisms and wry observations on the little river town, he also proves to be the catalyst that solves the mystery, radically changing the lives of all of those involved.

Interestingly, Mark Twain's use of fingerprints as evidence in a fictional criminal trial predated the official acceptance of such evidence in actual U.S. courts by two years.

This recording is a recreation of Mark Twain's own reading, just as his family might have heard the story for the first time in the family library.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Krista Wheatley | 2/17/2014

    " Entertained me. Didn't astound. Something required for Twain heads. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 2/10/2014

    " Racism, murder, identity theft... What's not to love? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathie Townsend | 2/10/2014

    " It was comical and suspenseful and very interesting because Mark Twain didn't live this life he wrote about. How could a white man write the emotions of a slave...even a free one. A kaliedoscopic view into white priviledge and all its trappings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sam | 2/6/2014

    " Read for school- not too bad. The story is short and although the dialect can be hard to understand at times, it's an easy book that brings up questions centered around 'nature vs. nurture' and 'what determines race?' "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erin | 2/3/2014

    " Read for 9th grade summer reading "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erica | 1/19/2014

    " I really enjoyed this story. Crazy how life was back then. I usually don't like old classic books because of the writing style and vocabulary but I really enjoyed this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Becca Miller | 1/14/2014

    " Even though I'm not typically a fan of American Literature from this time period, I actually thouroughly enjoyed reading this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Catherine Siemann | 1/13/2014

    " Twain really nails it, in this humorous tale of murder, scientific investigations, mistaken identity and racial classification. Twain highlights the absurdity of racial classifications; the story is sometimes uncomfortable, but much of that comes from the characters' own acceptance of their society's stereotypes, which Twain does a lot to explode. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim | 1/4/2014

    " Apart from the humor and trenchant satire you always get with Mark Twain, this is a fun murder mystery with a twist and an interesting history lesson about the complicated, incomprehensible and hypocritical laws regarding race, the legally defined degrees thereof and slavery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Casey | 1/1/2014

    " If Tom Sawyer and hick Finn are 5 stars this has to be 3. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jaena Rae | 12/26/2013

    " This is the last time I attempt to read a book on my phone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anupama | 12/14/2013

    " Hilarious satire - loved Twain's writing "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 11/28/2013

    " This book brings me way back. "Switched at Birth"- from a nineteenth century perspective. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Valerie | 11/28/2013

    " Great books stolen from my father. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan Monk | 11/25/2013

    " I have not read Mark Twain in many years. Was a good (sarcasm abounds) read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie Suzanne | 11/20/2012

    " I really enjoyed this story that opens up the "nature vs. nurture" debate. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Akilah | 10/9/2012

    " Oh, Mark Twain, you just always wear the hat of cleverness, don't you? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nate | 9/25/2012

    " pretty quick read that fits a lot into its short page length, including the first noted use of fingerprinting crime scene forensics in fictional literature. i particularly enjoyed the bits in vernacular "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joel | 9/19/2012

    " AS much fun as any new mystery "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michaelwilliam | 9/15/2012

    " I have been retreading Twain this summer. always amazed at Twain's extraordinary talents. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gerald Curtis | 6/16/2012

    " Far from what I would consider a typical Mark Twain, this story was quite engaging. I enjoyed it very much. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lily | 1/6/2012

    " One of my all time favs,can't go wrong with Mark Twain. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ike | 7/23/2011

    " I read this a long time ago, but I remember it being a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne | 5/8/2011

    " This is one of those books I just love with an unreasoning love. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rosanna | 4/28/2011

    " Pretty much everything from Pudd'nhead Wilson's calender is a memorable quote. I loved that about the book. Twain had a gift, there's no doubt about that. Surprisingly, he didn't keep my attention as well as expected though, so I only gave 3 stars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 4/25/2011

    " This was such a funny, delightful story. I loved Wilson's calendar entries. I must 'get' Twain's humor, I was chuckling to myself the whole read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeffrey | 4/22/2011

    " A short read, I enjoyed it thoroughly. As with any Twain novel there is a great story line imbued with social commentary. However, I particularly liked the mystery and the detective work by Pudd'nhead; using some new fangled things like fingerprints. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Al | 4/20/2011

    " I liked Mark Twain when I was a child.... Boring as an adult. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 3/29/2011

    " Mark Twain, you have a way with words--I'm in love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Museborn | 3/26/2011

    " Excellent! Twain at his best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Becca | 3/22/2011

    " Even though I'm not typically a fan of American Literature from this time period, I actually thouroughly enjoyed reading this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Krista | 3/14/2011

    " Entertained me. Didn't astound. Something required for Twain heads. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greta | 3/10/2011

    " Mark Twain weaves the sorrow of slavery with the idiocy of racism into an entertaining tall tale about one small town on the Mississippi river in the the 19th century. Hard to imagine that this makes a good book, but it does. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Taunya | 3/3/2011

    " I'm lovin' this book, have always loved Mr. Twain. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.