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Download Psmith in the City Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Psmith in the City (Unabridged) Audiobook, by P. G. Wodehouse
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,170 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: P. G. Wodehouse Narrator: Frederick Davidson Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2001 ISBN:
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Work, said Psmith, with simple dignity. I am now a member of the staff of this bank. Its interests are my interests. Psmith, the individual, ceases to exist, and there springs into being Psmith, the cog in the wheel of the New Asiatic Bank; Psmith, the link in the bank's chain; Psmith, the Worker. I shall not spare myself, he proceeded earnestly. I shall toil with all the accumulated energy of one who, up till now, has only known what work is like from hearsay.

You and I together, not forgetting Comrade Jackson, the pet of the Smart Set, will toil early and late till we boost up this Postage Department into a shining model of what a Postage Department should be. What that is at present, I do not exactly know.

Psmith and his friend Mike Jackson have been pressed into jobs in the city. Psmith intends to keep his knowledge of work limited to hearsay, and uses his wit and sangfroid to smooth over the world of business for Mike and himself.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Agnieszka | 2/15/2014

    " It was enjoyable in the general Wodehouse way, but not as good as the Jeeves & Wooster stuff. I recommend it to fans of Wodehouse. It's set in New York in the Gangs of New York era and while I'm no historical authority it seems a bit off. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 2/9/2014

    " Most amusing...which was the point, I think. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laurele | 2/3/2014

    " Psilly and pfun! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Swapna | 1/29/2014

    " I was very young when I read this book. It was my first P.G and all I remember is that I had a tummy-ache laughing while I read it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 1/17/2014

    " 3 1/2 stars. Very funny, and we would of course expect no less from Wodehouse, but had a tendency to drag. Also, this book reminded me of just how little I know about cricket. It did not inspire me to learn more on the subject. I will likely read others in the series, because Wodehouse is just so great. And really, Psmith is a very entertaining character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 A.J. | 1/12/2014

    " A lesson in faultlessly funny writing and one in history, too: a snapshot of upper-middle-class life in 1910. I had no ideas that taxis were originally 'taximeter cabs', for example. The story is simple enough, but Wodehouse's prose pushes it up to a four-star from what would be a three for any other writer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Krisette Spangler | 1/9/2014

    " I've read several Wodehouse books, but this was the first one in the Psmith series. Psmith and his friend Mike start working at the New Asiatic Bank for the cranky Mr. Bickersdyke. Psmith makes it his mission to make the bank's atmosphere a more pleasant place to work. The ensuing story is charming and funny. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer Beckstead | 1/6/2014

    " Love P.G. Wodehouse! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leslie | 1/5/2014

    " Funnier than a Finknottle and Wiser than a Wooster, Psmith is Wodehouse's forgotten protagonist. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Don | 12/30/2013

    " Un-funny and very dated. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denise Eggleston | 11/17/2013

    " P.G Wodehouse is always fun to read. His comedy is still funny today--it's in the characters. However, it would help to understand cricket when reading this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 11/9/2013

    " My first encounter with a Wodehouse character not directly connected to Jeeves. I was very pleased to make his acquaintance, also that of Comrade Jackson. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Constandinos | 10/21/2013

    " Very entertaining. Highly recommended. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Edelhart Kempeneers | 10/16/2013

    " Best leuk. Lichte, luchtige humor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Machata | 8/28/2013

    " Psmith, with a silent p as in ptarmigan. Delighted to recommend a one hundred year old humor treat written by Plum Wodehouse, one of the greatest humorists and stylists to ever tap at a typewriter! Smith ranks with Bertie and Jeeves. Great enduring fun. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eleanore | 8/21/2013

    " Not quite as side-splitting as the Jeeves and Wooster books so far, but quality Wodehouse, nonetheless! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard Tolleson | 7/24/2013

    " I thoroughly enjoyed this little book. It's very funny, and well-written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt | 6/18/2013

    " Ah, Psmith. I loved it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob Ladwig | 6/3/2013

    " Psmith is a character that grows in one's appreciation, his pop "socialism" and monocle teamed up with Mike's love of cricket make this story enjoyable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan Schwent | 5/17/2013

    " The only bad things about the Psmith books is that Wodehouse only wrote four of them. The cry goes out around the town "Psmith is the alligator's Adam's apple." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meave | 2/17/2013

    " It's just so perfectly, delicately written that it makes for excellent depression 2.0 escapist literature. I could read a dozen books about Psmith. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David Nadolny | 12/1/2012

    " What a fabulous book. The nes goes out to the citizens, once again Comrade Wodehouse has delivered! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 3/10/2012

    " Psmith (with a silent P) is an unforgettable character! This is the first time I've read of him, and concerns his adventures with his friend Mike at their first job, working in a London bank. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 10/17/2011

    " Psmith takes prominence as Mike (and the cricket) is gradually marginalised - good call. Having set them up as a double act it is as if Wodehouse has suddenly realised that he's on to a winner with just 50% of them but needs a way to let the other half down gently. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 5/16/2011

    " I love P.G. Wodehouse. He is, of course, most famous for his Jeeves and Wooster stories, but this book is up there with the best he's written. I've read it several times and it still makes me laugh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly | 4/29/2011

    " Why has it taken me thirty years to learn about Psmith? This is hysterical. I love Wodehouse and I love this character. So funny. Light easy read. I need more Psmith books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jesse | 12/13/2010

    " More Wodehousian fun. My current favorite character, the debonair, erudite, garrulous socialist Psmith (the P is silent) ends up "working" in a bank. Absolutely delightful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meave | 8/21/2010

    " It's just so perfectly, delicately written that it makes for excellent depression 2.0 escapist literature. I could read a dozen books about Psmith. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 8/11/2010

    " What a fabulous book. The nes goes out to the citizens, once again Comrade Wodehouse has delivered! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 7/29/2010

    " "She glanced at him with an eye that would have looked markedly expressionless on a boiled fish." Mmmmm. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nandan | 3/20/2010

    " Hilarious, fast moving.Psmith is very intersting character.I am fan of his talkativeness.How he manages smoothly from every situation is amazing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 2/6/2010

    " Psmith, with a silent p as in ptarmigan. Delighted to recommend a one hundred year old humor treat written by Plum Wodehouse, one of the greatest humorists and stylists to ever tap at a typewriter! Smith ranks with Bertie and Jeeves. Great enduring fun. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anne | 8/1/2009

    " Psmith (with a silent P) is an unforgettable character! This is the first time I've read of him, and concerns his adventures with his friend Mike at their first job, working in a London bank. "

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About the Author

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (1881–1975) was an English humorist who wrote novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He was highly popular throughout a career that lasted more than seventy years, and his many writings continue to be widely read. He is best known for his novels and short stories of Bertie Wooster and his manservant Jeeves and for his settings of English upper-class society of the pre– and post–World War I era. He lived in several countries before settling in the United States after World War II. During the 1920s, he collaborated with Broadway legends like Cole Porter and George Gershwin on musicals and, in the 1930s, expanded his repertoire by writing for motion pictures. He was honored with a knighthood in 1975.

About the Narrator

Frederick Davidson (1932–2005), also known as David Case, was one of the most prolific readers in the audiobook industry, recording more than eight hundred audiobooks in his lifetime, including over two hundred for Blackstone Audio. Born in London, he trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and performed for many years in radio plays for the British Broadcasting Company before coming to America in 1976. He received AudioFile’s Golden Voice Award and numerous Earphones Awards and was nominated for a Grammy for his readings.