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Download Prometheus Bound Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Prometheus Bound (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Aeschylus
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,584 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Aeschylus Narrator: Robin Field Publisher: Mission Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2010 ISBN:
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When a jealous Zeus discovers that the compassionate Titan, Prometheus, has introduced the gift of fire to liberate mere mortals from oppression and servitude, he has Prometheus bound to a rocky prison in the Scythian desert, where the god discloses the reason for his punishment.

Prometheus Bound is one of only seven surviving plays by the prolific Athenian playwright, Aeschylus. Born into a noble family in 525 BC, Aeschylus is credited with having introduced dialogue into the Greek drama, and indeed is a father of modern theater.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sam | 2/20/2014

    " I don't think this was the translation I read (my notes say Podlecki, Dawson, Lembke, Roche), but I can't find the one I did read. Great plays though. Aeschylus remains my favorite of the Greek dramatists. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 2/18/2014

    " An ancient Greek tragedy, consisting mostly of monologues or discussion between two people. Prometheus, the Titan is chained to a mountain as punishment for giving mankind the gift of fire. Prometheus hints at the overthrow of Zeus and tells of his other gifts to humanity and is visited by Io, whose travels he predicts and the birth of Heracles who will free him. Hermes visits Prometheus on behalf of Zeus demanding to know who will overthrow Zeus, when Prometheus refuses, Zeus strikes him with a thunderbolt, sending him into an abyss. A short play with several interesting monologues and an open ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maxfield | 2/14/2014

    " I didn't read this version, I read the Project Gutenberg version. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Keith | 1/23/2014

    " I read only The Persians translated by Seth Benardette. This is not a very compelling play to read. It is a long lament by the Persians who had lost a war to the Athenians. In performance, with music and staging, it may have been a more compelling piece, but on the page it is rather anticlimatic.(less) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carl Sof2014 | 1/14/2014

    " Greek Tragedies are quite insightful, and can be read over and over for deeper meaning. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Noce | 1/7/2014

    " Truly one of the best Greek dramas ever written. It is spare yet vast. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard Zhang | 1/5/2014

    " Just as Sophocles, Aeschylus is a great playwright. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carol | 1/3/2014

    " Only read 'Agamemnon' for class. Wow that was some hard reading! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 12/13/2013

    " The origins of great drama, but let's face it, not the stuff of great drama. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott | 10/21/2013

    " I don't know why, but I've always felt close to this piece. Maybe it's the myth that cmes before and after. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aziz | 10/16/2013

    " Poignant portrayal of Greek Mythology's most famous humanist. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick Black | 9/13/2013

    " Seven Against Thebes set out a generative form for punk bands evermore, and the Persians is actually really good. They're all passable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 10/10/2012

    " A very nice edition in a red slip case. Unfortunately my slip case was destroyed in a flood, but I saved the book itself. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Valerie | 3/22/2012

    " I don't remember why I went on the ancient Greek kick when I was in middle school. I'll blame D'aulaire. I think they also get the blame for all the Eddas. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jim O'Loughlin | 3/2/2012

    " Although it seems kind of trivial to need to note whether or not I liked Aeschylus. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jo | 12/19/2011

    " A collection of Greek tragedies based on mythological tales. I especially liked the one about the woman turned into a cow to protect her maidenhead. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Antonia | 11/20/2011

    " The one I actually had to read is only 60 pages, but yeah. This is the second time I read it, but I liked it more this time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Benjamin Plume | 8/29/2011

    " See Aeschylus I, lol. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 M. Bartos | 6/18/2011

    " I feel bad giving less than three stars to a cultural artifact like this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gabriel Joseph | 4/20/2011

    " This is my favorite translation. I have read this many times. Classic Greek tragedy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 3/21/2011

    " It's a shame only part of this tragedy remains. Way to drop the ball, western civilization. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 1/12/2011

    " Not really that exciting on stage tho... gotta say. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 11/14/2010

    " If I remember correctly, this was a bit too modern a translation. Something about the phrase "cocky bastard" just doesn't scream ancient Greece to me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ariel | 8/9/2010

    " It wasn't bad, for ancient lit (not my favorite). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bird Brian | 2/15/2010

    " Read this in college- due for a re-read! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzette | 1/21/2010

    " Not really up on classic Greek literature, but I thought this play was very interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 12/21/2009

    " And the moral of the story is: don't play with fire. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah | 12/3/2009

    " I've never read this play. I enjoyed it. It's about a greek Titan Prometheus who is bound to a rock away from human contact by Zeus for teaching men the art of fire and prophecy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark | 10/22/2009

    " Truly one of the best Greek dramas ever written. It is spare yet vast. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aziz | 5/16/2009

    " Poignant portrayal of Greek Mythology's most famous humanist. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roy | 4/2/2009

    " this play is pretty boring, cuz all there is some guy chained to a rock, n people just pass him by n talk. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia | 3/30/2009

    " O conto de Prometeu, aprisionado a uma rocha e condenado a terríveis tormentos por ter dado ao homem o fogo, é maravilhosamente contado por Ésquilo, em um livro que seria fonte de inspiração para Goethe, Lord Byron e o casal Shelley. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeremy | 12/22/2008

    " It's a shame only part of this tragedy remains. Way to drop the ball, western civilization. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gabriel | 12/12/2008

    " This is my favorite translation. I have read this many times. Classic Greek tragedy. "

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About the Author
Author Aeschylus

Aeschylus (c. 525–456 BC) was the earliest of the three great tragic playwrights of ancient Greece whose work has survived to the twenty-first century. He fought bravely in the Battle of Salamis, which inspired his first surviving play, The Persians. According to legend, he died in Sicily when an eagle dropped a tortoise on his head.

About the Narrator

Robin Field is the AudioFile Earphones Award–winning narrator of numerous audiobooks, as well as an award-winning actor, singer, writer, and lyricist whose career has spanned six decades. He has starred on and off Broadway, headlined at Carnegie Hall, authored numerous musical reviews, and hosted or performed on a number of television and radio programs over the years.