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Download Poe's Detective: The Dupin Stories Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Poes Detective: The Dupin Stories (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Edgar Allan Poe
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (3,772 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edgar Allan Poe Narrator: Bronson Pinchot Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2011 ISBN:
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Edgar Allan Poe is the undisputed Father of the Detective story and his Detective C. Auguste Dupin set the stage for eccentric, logic-wielding sleuths like Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. This is the first audio collection of Poe's detective stories, plus one non-Dupin detective tale, Thou Art the Man. Celebrity narrator Bronson Pinchot delivers amazing performances of The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Mystery of Marie Rogêt, The Purloined Letter, and Thou Art the Man.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsay | 2/4/2014

    " A must read... one of the best detective stories I've read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dru | 1/31/2014

    " While I enjoy a few things of Poe, the detective "Dupin" is a bit of a bore. I'm sure they were fascinating tales at the time, but they are so easy to "solve" by today's standards. So...they don't really hold up well over time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doskoi_panda | 1/26/2014

    " Poe's work itself is 5 stars, no question. But this edition would benefit from some footnotes/annotations for some of the more obscure things and the French phrases, rather than the additional material and the "reader's circle" questions/discussions, particularly for someone not familiar with the early 1800s. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chiara | 1/20/2014

    " 2 murders in Paris are too complicated for the policement but not for our investigator... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pippa222 | 1/20/2014

    " The Murders in the Rue Morgue was absolutely brilliant and it made me wonder why the police don't enlist the help of writers in difficult cases. (As a writer myself I know how quickly I can work out complex scenarios, be sensitive to the slightest hint of untruth, and understand people's motivation). These are some of the essential strengths of a good writer. Poe got it right in this tale, and knowing that it is based on a real life case makes it even more interesting. The other two stories are very good too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doron Yam | 1/19/2014

    " This was my first Poe written work that I read. I must say it was good BUT in some places it was too long and it could be cut to the point. The need to explain the way of thinking and and the reasons that led to that way were, in some points, tyring and boring. The rest of the book (all of the stories) was great and showed me how to look at things in most objective way. A good one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 1/11/2014

    " Though the narrator comes off as odd and pompous, I liked this short story. It was an interesting mystery. I felt I needed to know what happened. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caroline Stewart | 1/3/2014

    " An orangutan did it. Need I say more? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Monica | 12/30/2013

    " Predecessor to Sherlock Holmes, Poe's Dupin detective stories are a great favorite of mine. The imagery of the orangutan having his way with the straight edge is indelible. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pam Sawyer | 12/21/2013

    " Call me dark, but I love poe's dark humor! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aileen | 11/30/2013

    " This story seemed well ahead of its time. I'm fascinated by Edgar Allan Poe and his life and death and even though his topics don't always enthrall me and I skip some of the wordiness of his writing style, the stories are interesting and creepy. Good, quick read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brianna | 11/28/2013

    " This is a fun Poe story. I recommend it if you like Poe. A mystery story. Like Sherlock Holmes or something. Very interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mikel | 11/13/2013

    " Think Sherlock Holmes meets Plutarch and that's pretty much what you have here. A strange combination but it works. Poe acknowledges that there are long pieces of treatise like exposition. Overall it was a good read but he beats the chess analogy drum a little too long. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tasha | 10/31/2013

    " Wow. Monkeys are scary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marts (Thinker) | 8/14/2013

    " Poe's great investigator, C. Auguste Dupin. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Patricia | 3/19/2013

    " Great fodder for the most macabre and unsettling of dreams. Or just all-round great, actually. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Smiller | 12/16/2012

    " Good early detective fiction, pre-forensic cliche. They are anti-action, and all about Poe's theories of "ratiocination". Poe is fun to read and a good source for audio recordings too. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 10/24/2012

    " A little wordy, but still good. Very interesting, and his reasoning is a little mind boggling... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jasmine | 2/5/2011

    " Too fantastical for me, but Dupin is very cool! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brett | 10/16/2010

    " Fun to look at the old stories and see the similarities with today's crime solver fiction. It's a little long as Poe tries to emphasize the genius of Dupin, butI hoped the class liked learning a little of the history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick | 7/13/2010

    " Poe basically came up with Sherlock Holmes, but called him Dupin. Then Conan Doyle ripped him off and the rest, as they say, is geography. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mariella | 6/10/2010

    " Weird, really. But somewhat brilliant. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 5/30/2010

    " Classic Poe narrative with less of the opium. The book provided an interesting introduction to set the stage in part 1. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 3/8/2010

    " I've just finished listening to a bunch of Sherlock Holmes & Chris said I should step back further and listen to Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue, which some call the first dectective novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Madeline | 3/8/2010

    " We are currently reading this book for our mysteries unit and it's very gorey but quite interesting! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren | 2/17/2010

    " One of the most fascinating things about this book is examining the similarities between this piece and the writings of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Direct connection and potential inspiration. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 The Doctor | 12/2/2009

    " The basis to all detective novels, the origin of a genre. A classic, Poe at his best created forensic thinking, and explained it as a literal walk in the park. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benjamin | 11/24/2009

    " After reading Holmes I went to Poe's Auguste Dupin (the original Holmes). Weird, gruesome stories. It's what you'd expect from Poe, I guess. "

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About the Author
Author Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1848) transformed the American literary landscape with his innovations in the short story genre and his haunting lyrical poetry, and he is credited with inventing American gothic horror and detective fiction. He was first published in 1827 and then began a career as a magazine writer and editor and a sharp literary critic. In 1845 the publication of his most famous poem, “The Raven,” brought him national fame.

About the Narrator

Bronson Pinchot has won eleven Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award for best narration and was named Audible’s Narrator of the Year for 2010. He received his education at Yale University, which filled out what he had already received at his mother’s knee in the all-important areas of Shakespeare, Greek art and architecture, and the Italian Renaissance. He restores Greek Revival buildings and appears in television, film, and on stage whenever the pilasters and entablatures overwhelm him.