Extended Audio Sample

Download Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science (Unabridged) Audiobook, by John Fleischman
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (857 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Fleischman Narrator: Kevin Orton Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 7 votes

In 1848 Vermont, railroad foreman Phineas Gage sat above a hole, preparing to blast through some granite. A 13-pound iron rod fell from his hands into the hole, triggering the explosion and sending the rod straight through Phineas' head. Thirty minutes after this terrible accident, Phineas sat on the steps of a hotel, patiently waiting for the town doctor to arrive. He chatted with his amazed coworkers as if nothing had happened. But something terrible had happened. The rod that shot through Phineas' head like a rocket had caused great damage. Yet - incredibly - Phineas survived another 11 years.

This extraordinary book tells the true story of one of the most remarkable accidents in human history. Listeners will not only be fascinated by all the gruesome details, but will also learn riveting information about how Phineas helped change the history of brain science. Download and start listening now!

BK_RECO_002913

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Louie Hernandez | 2/15/2014

    " Phineas Gage was truly a man with a hole in his head. A railroad construction foreman, Phineas was blasting rock near Cavendish, Vermont, in 1848 when a thirteen-pound iron rod was shot through his brain. For some reason, he survived another eleven years and became a textbook case in brain science. But of course he was forever changed by the accident, and what happened inside his brain will tell you a lot about how your brain works and what makes us who we are. And also made further more informaton about brain science, and how to better treat it. But as I said Phineas met his demise eleven years later, but even though that many doctors were amaze on how that was possible. But because of Phineas Gage we were able to realize how to do surgery and the energy waves of the brain, and we bettered ourselves on how precious the brain is. The author also combines this believe-it-or-not story with a history of brain research, including everything from phrenology to high-tech tools. The text is cool, makes you curious wanting to read of a gruesome story will get drawn down in heavier sections on brain physiology and chemistry, as for that Phineas was indeed a trooper for surviving that long. ^-^ "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Govednik | 2/8/2014

    " This thorough book, for ages 10 and up, offers a glimpse into the life of the famous subject as well as great science info on the brain, a bit of science history, and a bit of investigation into some of the mysteries surrounding Phineas Gage after his injury. The format is very easy to follow, and there are great supporting photographs and diagrams. The author avoided turning the story into a science textbook and instead manages to adopt an interesting story-telling style when necessary to keep us engaged. The modern science techniques detailed confirm just how "lucky" Gage was to survive, and what his injury taught the medical world about the human brain. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chelsea Gail Smith | 2/6/2014

    " Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science by John Fleischman is a very interesting story about a man in 1848 who in a freak accident at a blasting rock led to a 13 pound iron rod was shot through his head and into his brain. This story especially interested me because it is related to psychology. I actually minor in psychology and we talked about this situation in my brain and behavior class. We talked about Phineas Gage and how his injury is one of the most interesting cases that has to deal with the brain. The accident left him completely able to walk talk and be normal, but friends and family started to notice his personality was completely different. Instead of being a nice enjoyable person, Phineas was rude, uncontrollable, and unpredictable. I liked this book because it is very age appropriate. It is not as gruesome as the title says and it gives background information on the medical history that was going on at this time. This story is good for children because it is a non fiction book that is actually interesting. The story is so out of the ordinary it almost seems like a fictional book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 1+1=42 (Math) | 2/4/2014

    " Sorta disgusting- but cool, way cool. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anita Prince | 1/27/2014

    " Phineas Gage works on the railroad in 1848. In a bizarre accident, a 13 pound iron rod is blasted through his skull. He lives another eleven years, but is not the same person he was before the accident. Learn about brain science while reading this gruesome true story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Edna | 1/21/2014

    " A huge rock explosion in 1848 propelled an iron rod into a railroad foreman's left cheek, past the inside of his left eye and out through the front of his skull. Although, he miraculously lived, his personality dramatically changed for the rest of his life. What we know now may explain what happened to his brain. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 1/8/2014

    " If you're a fellow Nerdfighter, you'll understand why I had to read this! For a book about freak accidents and brain science, it's certainly witty and entertaining. Nothing is drawn out, I didn't find myself bored at all. In fact, I read it all in one sitting. Phineas Gage is truly a remarkable case, I think anyone would be intrigued by it, especially the brain science aspects discussed later in the book (which was written out clearly and made easy to understand!) Definitely worth it - if you can stomach it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chelsey | 1/7/2014

    " Interesting read! Tells a lot about the history of Brain science! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 12/19/2013

    " Intersting read, interesting story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marcus B | 11/25/2013

    " Wanna see how science first learned about the brain. Its short and sweet! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachael | 10/3/2013

    " Fascinating account and history. I love it and so do my students. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 10/2/2013

    " This is an awesome book. Easy to read, too. If you haven't read it, and you like weird human body (and brain, especially!) stories, pick it up. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caleb Garner | 6/20/2013

    " Good overall, a bit dry. There is a lot of odd information about the human brain. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jonah warner | 5/20/2013

    " i have read about a guy who got shot not with a bollit but a spere shot out of a gun. it went right through his cheek and out his forehead.i think it is a pretty god book because it is about a real story.also i like to read things about injuries. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 MV | 12/6/2012

    " Fleischman seems to think that being human means being "social" & I must say that I believe that is poppycock. Other than that, it really whet my appetite for more info on Gage ... for now. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Quinton | 9/25/2012

    " I really injoyed reading this book I did not do any status updates on it because it was a quick read but was very interesting. Makes you think about how someone could live through that. I Could not put this book down when I got it I would recommend this to anyone at all. 4 out of 5 stars "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nikolos Robinson | 6/14/2012

    " This book rules I would reccomend that everyone in this planet reads this book! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 2/28/2012

    " Engaging young adult NF. Part narrative, part expository, good visual aids. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kerry | 2/26/2012

    " I absolutely loved this book! I read this one when we first got it at the library and an article in The Smithsonian reminded me of it. Absolutely amazing and fascinating story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joleen | 10/27/2011

    " This is a very fun and interesting short non-fiction read. It was a little gross when they were describing the injury but the facts and details in the books were very informative. A great quick read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Samk | 5/10/2011

    " A Really Great Book on the Strange Fate Of Phineas Gage. A great read for those who are interested in medical history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mayra | 5/5/2011

    " It was a little strange but I thought it was really interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janelle | 5/1/2011

    " I loved this story. I know so much more about the brain than I did before. Kinda gory when it gets to explaining his accedient but that makes it all the more better! My eyes were glued to this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly | 4/29/2011

    " Fun and gruesome! But I love brain science, so don't take my word for it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 4/18/2011

    " Loved this....excellent YA informational book presented in a very readable manner! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 4/18/2011

    " Great nonfiction. I think I'll use it as a piece to study different text structures for my 7th graders. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mr. | 12/17/2010

    " Very interesting book- it shows that Science can be just as interesting as fiction! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa | 11/3/2010

    " Fascinating, if you're interested in how the brain works. Gage's case was a breakthrough in brain research. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessi | 11/2/2010

    " The true story of a man who had a rod ram through his brain and started brain science.
    Well told at a 4-6 grade level. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kendra | 10/18/2010

    " I've heard of Phineas Gage before but this is the first book for kids I've seen on the subject. The author does a good job of describing the science behind the injury without getting too technical. I can see those that like reading about the bizarre, macabre or just plain strange will love it. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations