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Download People of the Lie, Volume 3: Possession and Group Evil Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample People of the Lie, Volume 3: Possession and Group Evil Audiobook, by M. Scott Peck
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,757 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: M. Scott Peck Narrator: M. Scott Peck Publisher: Simon & Schuster Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2010 ISBN:
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Dr. M. Scott Peck has inspired millions by combining the deepest insights of psychiatry with those of religion. In this final volume of his compelling audio series based on the best-selling book People of the Life, Dr. Peck once again integrates religious teaching with the science of all psychology as he offers hope for healing one of society's most persistent failings: human evil.

In Volume 3, Dr. Peck explores the largely unknown world of possession and exorcism. He also describes the unique relationship between group evil and individual evil, demonstrating how one person can affect or be affected by the actions and attitudes of a group. Drawing on his experiences as a psychiatrist and his observations of vivid incidents of evil in today's society. Dr. Peck takes us further into the dark side of the human psyche.

Told in Dr. Peck's characteristic warm and accessible style, People of the Life, Volume 3, concludes his groundbreaking exploration of the essence of evil and provides a spiritual understanding as well as a way of coping with this age-old problem.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kirstin Elaine Myers | 2/20/2014

    " This is not a pleasant or fun book to read, and in fact it is chilling but is still a must-read. Peck discusses the problem of Evil and his experience of psychiatric therapy with patients who appear manifestly evil . He arguesthat a spiritual or even religious dimension is required to aid in the understanding of human nature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 2/16/2014

    " First, let me make it clear that my 4 stars apply only to the first 180 pages or so of this book. I'm not going to bother rating the rest of it. That first 180 though... very interesting. I like Peck's definition of evil, and found myself underlining phrase after phrase that rang true to me. I believe that evil is very real, and that there are people who are evil - by choice, of course. As a graduate student of psychology, I found all of this very interesting, and I would definitely like to see evil studied scientifically and treated as a disorder. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vince | 2/15/2014

    " This was the first book about evil people I read and ten years later I decided to read it again. It doesn't fare well a second time. What I've understood about evil is that it is related to the condition of psychopathy or sociopathy or antisocial personality disorder. These are scientific terms describing a whole host of 'evil' traits listed by Dr Robert Hare: lack of conscience, empathy, grandiosity, scapegoating, lying etc. There are a number of far better reads like The Sociopath Next Door, Snakes In Suits, Without Conscience, etc which give a more scientific understanding of the problem. This book by contrast is subjective while pretending to be objective and I found myself disliking the author quite a bit. In his sessions with 'Charlene' I began rooting somewhat for his patient in their contest and felt her frustration with dealing with such a dork! Why did he continue therapy for so many years with her? Sorry, not for ethical reasons and helping a patient but because he was getting paid. The chapter on posession was where I bailed out this time around. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tsahai Wright | 2/12/2014

    " eye-opening read. you will look at people and yourself differently after reading! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rich Deleo | 2/8/2014

    " This book was profound. It tells of human evil in a way that is so mundane that it is scary. Be courageous and read this book. You will be a better person for it... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Johnny Story | 2/2/2014

    " Evil fascinates me. It operates throughout our society largely unnoticed by people who fail to identify it (not as easy as you may think it to be), or by optimistic people who would like to think it does not exist. While Peck doesn't get in detail about the two exorcism he partook in, he clearly identifies evil on three different levels. This book really opens your eyes to the psychology of evil, the shadows, and the real possibility of demons. I recommend this book to anyone, even though I picked it up more for research. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 marie monroe | 2/2/2014

    " this book is frightening because it reveals the narcissist as devoid of empathy not just a bore. peck made a great argument for expanding the antisocial diagnostic criteria to include the extremely self-preoccupied: everyone is an object. no one and nothing matters but the self. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 1/23/2014

    " This is an interesting book, but I don't think it's Peck's finest work. His case studies are very interesting -- I'm thinking of four of the "evil" patients he works with (at least two of them are actually the patient's parents). It's helpful for anyone who either works with or plans to work with patients who seem to be incapable of real honesty. His look at the Vietnam atrocity in My Lai is also interesting but a bit long winded. I think it just hard for me to get my head around his talk about exorcisms and the like. I am a believer in God, but I try not to think too much about the devil, and Peck's work doesn't really allow for that! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Haley | 1/20/2014

    " A really really interesting book on human nature and the world in general "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debby | 1/16/2014

    " great topic....I think the book would be more balanced if it had a few more examples of evil in men, most of the evil is seen in women. He might also be a little biased against people he personally feels a revulsion towards. Being disorganized and annoying does not make a person evil. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alice Liu | 1/8/2014

    " Strange to think this is the same author of the Road Less Traveled. I guess with any book about evil, you have to actually believe in evil (i.e. evil versus good). I'm not so much for dichotomous thinking, so this book did not resonate with me at all, thought the part about exorcisms was hilarious. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Abdulla Al-shammari | 12/6/2013

    " So deep I had to pause for a couple of days between each chapter to ponder. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlotte Hutson Wrenn | 11/10/2013

    " Brilliant and true. This book will truly jolt your thinking around good and evil. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gail Longton Harper | 11/7/2013

    " Explained a lot. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 HORTA | 10/23/2013

    " "I bought this book to research a possible project. It was profoundly unbearable to read." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret-jane | 10/14/2013

    " good read to improve understanding of people - love all M.Scott Peck works - read them all "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Takipsilim | 10/7/2013

    " One of the most telling studies on the nature of human evil. Peck doesn't offer any definitive answers, but touches on and succeeds in conveying some facts on the darker side of humanity. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mom | 9/25/2013

    " This is an excellent book that describes the embodiment of evil. From individually evil to evil that develops in a group setting. Tremendous "self test" to use when one thinks he/she is in the presence of a genuinely evil person. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie Phillips | 8/19/2013

    " This book will freak you out and make you a little paranoid about creepy people in the world. A bit odd, but totally interesting and worth the time commitment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Irene | 7/2/2013

    " very strong and insightful. i love this superbbbb! awww "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carroll Straus | 6/3/2013

    " A lot about human evil. Not a book for everyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 lmc | 5/31/2013

    " Interesting - fairly accurate, spooky thinking that I have met a couple of people that are the type that Peck describes in the book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carol Gee | 5/25/2013

    " This is, in the opinion of those who know his work, Peck's very best work. In it, he is willing to encounter evil. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard Moore | 12/20/2012

    " Shocking and appalling how deep the depravity of the human mind, soul, psyche, and heart can go. This is an amazing book of stories almost too evil to believe. If you want to understand human evil this is a must read "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lynn | 9/27/2012

    " Highly recommended, but have a dictionary by your side. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laurita Hollingsworth | 7/12/2012

    " Excellent and enlightening "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lenore Skomal | 6/16/2012

    " Here's the bottom line: Lying is the root of evil. I agree. But the book was self-serving and in MHO, boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael Adamson | 5/18/2012

    " Great book. Not as good as The Road Less Traveled, but a very good read nonetheless. I read this just after finishing my first year of grad school at NYU. Very helpful in understanding some of my own and others behavior. What a tangled web we can weave sometimes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 4/12/2012

    " This is an interesting pschological study about evil personality types. I found it facinating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maureen Shillington | 10/19/2011

    " Peck tells it like it is. One of my all time favorite books....because someone is telling me the truth! One of the most memorable books about everyday Psychology and a starting point for Personal Development. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Freya | 5/24/2011

    " Quite interesting in patches but very hard to take seriously given some of the God/Satan/Evil content. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 4/14/2011

    " Intense and very self stirring. Caution when reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danny | 3/27/2011

    " The scary side of human nature

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Etta | 3/4/2011

    " I read this because of my need to attempt to understand a son-in-law (who became an ex). It was somewhat helpful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ron | 2/25/2011

    " I read it as a teenager after I read The Road Less traveled--both were my first independent experiences with the power of NF. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 April | 2/24/2011

    " Most people don't want to see lying as evil - what if it is the heart of evil! What if it is those people "who seem innocent but when you get down to it are subtly manipulating everyone around them" that are truly the most destructive in society? This book examines that idea! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 12/15/2010

    " Actually, I am not sure how to feel about this book. Yes and No. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debby | 10/22/2010

    " great topic....I think the book would be more balanced if it had a few more examples of evil in men, most of the evil is seen in women. He might also be a little biased against people he personally feels a revulsion towards. Being disorganized and annoying does not make a person evil. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Takipsilim | 10/15/2010

    " One of the most telling studies on the nature of human evil. Peck doesn't offer any definitive answers, but touches on and succeeds in conveying some facts on the darker side of humanity. "

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About the Author
Author M. Scott Peck

M. Scott Peck (1936–2005) was a widely acclaimed writer, thinking, psychiatrist, and spiritual guide. A graduate of Harvard University and Case Western Reserve, Dr. Peck served in the Army Medical Corps before maintaining a private practice in psychiatry. His books range a variety of topics, and some of his titles include People of the Lie, The Different Drum, A World Waiting to Be Born, The Road Less Traveled, and many others.