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Extended Audio Sample Pattern Recognition Audiobook, by William Gibson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (20,508 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: William Gibson Narrator: Shelly Frasier Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2004 ISBN: 9781400170951
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Cayce Pollard is a new kind of prophet - a world renowned "coolhunter" who predicts the hottest trends. While in London to evaluate the redesign of a famous corporate logo, she's offered a different assignment: find the creator of the obscure, enigmatic video clips being uploaded on the Internet - footage that is generating massive underground buzz worldwide. Still haunted by the memory of her missing father - a Cold War security guru who disappeared in downtown Manhattan on the morning of September 11, 2001 - Cayce is soon traveling through parallel universes of marketing, globalization, and terror, heading always for the still point where the three converge. From London to Tokyo to Moscow, she follows the implications of a secret as disturbing - and compelling - as the twenty-first century promises to be ... "Elegant, entrancing ... [Cayce's] globe-trotting gives Pattern Recognition its exultant, James Bond-ish edge..." ~The New York Times "Gibson's usual themes are still intact - globalism, constant surveillance, paranoia, and pattern recognition - only with the added presence of real-world elements..." ~Booklist Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • A 2004 Locus Award Nominee
  • A 2004 Arthur C. Clarke Award Nominee

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shawn Roberts | 2/1/2014

    " Science Fiction is not my normal bailiwick. This book was tightly written, but the discursive reality of genre fiction is just not my thing. If you like Minority Report, this will be up your alley. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 1/14/2014

    " I picked this book up at the library because I felt like reading something a little more challenging than some of my recent books. This did challenge me more; I was even lost occasionally (but I question if that had more to do with the writing than my personal deficiencies). The biggest drawback of the book was that it took a very long time to get going--I didn't feel like there was much plot in the first 100 pages or so. The author (Gibson) used the opening of the book to lay a groundwork examination of marketing and globalization. I almost gave up, but when the plot finally took off, I was hooked and enjoyed it thoroughly. Personally I think Gibson could have done a better job of integrating his social commentary throughout the plot so the beginning wasn't so slow. A highlight of the book is the heroine, Cayce Pollard, who is smart, strong, interesting, and flawed enough to be personable. I also really appreciated how well Gibson wrote about the different cities that the book is set in. He conveyed the unique nuances of Tokyo just as I remember them, and because he did such a good job with Tokyo, I felt like I could trust his descriptions of London and Moscow even though I have not been to those cities. In summary, an interesting book examining the role of marketing and globalization in a post-9/11 world that has enough elements of a classic Russian spy novel to keep it suspenseful. Content warning: a smattering of strong language here and there, but generally a clean read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Deanna | 1/13/2014

    " I can barely remember this book now, but I remember I loved it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alistair | 1/3/2014

    " This is not the usual plot line for a Gibson story. I was suprised that I actually read it. But Gibson story is well written and there is enough character depth to keep you interested. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janine | 12/20/2013

    " This is my second favorite Gibson novel, immediately behind "Neuromancer". I found this book at a time in my life where I was traveling a lot, and my personal life had some similarities to Cayce's life. I felt a very strong connection to this book, and still find myself quoting bits of it from time to time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jesse Whitworth | 12/5/2013

    " Fucking amazing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 bookczuk | 11/26/2013

    " Though Neuromancer is the favorite William Gibson for the males in my family, I am particularly fond of this novel of his. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 11/16/2013

    " Pattern Recognition is a well-paced novel of corporate intrigue, mystery, and culture. Cayce Pollard is a delightful character and it's clear from the writing that Gibson did a splendid job crafting her. The novel is also a great example---and exploration---of postmodernism and the often whimsical, but also at times disconcerting way it plays with forms and jolts you out of complacency. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily Leathers | 11/13/2013

    " CS spy thriller. Awesome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allison | 10/10/2013

    " This guy is the tits. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Remy | 9/8/2013

    " Boring strangely. I didn't care. I thought I loved the parts about cool hunting and advertising, but then it lost me. I've read too much Gibson, and haven't really been satisfied since 'Count Zero." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Riannon | 8/31/2013

    " I just want to say for the record: that "cyberpunk" is the stupidest name anyone has ever come up with for a genre. Other than that, this book was a pretty decent read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nathan | 7/7/2013

    " Stopped reading; he was trying too hard and it was annoying. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joe Montgomery | 5/4/2013

    " i found that the most interesting part of this book was the protagonist's paranoia. Her weakness, aversion to certain product design, was a great symptom and I wonder if it exists in our world or if it will exist in the future. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Flemming Funch | 1/7/2013

    " It has some compelling ideas in it, but I must admit that I found it a bit boring. It was slight difficult to even finish it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brian Sutton | 10/16/2012

    " A favorite. Sparse and lyrical: Gibson at his finest. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chelsea Starr | 8/7/2012

    " the main character was pretty cheesy in her "cool"-ness. but other than that, this book read like a movie. fast-paced. bring it to the beach. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clare | 5/11/2012

    " This was the most enjoyable of Gibson's oeuvre that I've read. I find him a bit formulaic, but "Pattern Recognition" was fast and comprehensible (not always the case with Gibson) and clever. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Martin Johnstone | 9/7/2011

    " I much prefer Gibson when he is writing near future fiction rather than the cyberpunk that i grew up with and Pattern Recognition is the best of those. Makes a nice companion to No Logo. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Oleg | 5/25/2011

    " The new Gibson does really blow one's mind, his language is very similar to the one of Douglas Coupland (as it turned out, he helped Gibson to describe the streets of Tokyo). Written really sweet, although I read it in russian. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/24/2011

    " My favorite Gibson book besides Neuromancer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Howard | 5/21/2011

    " The first of Gibson's Blue Ant trilogy, set in the modern world, and dealing in contrasting themes of marketing and espionage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kyle | 5/9/2011

    " A good book but not as good as I'd hoped. If I'd read it when it came out in 2003 I'm sure it would of been much more mind-blowing but 8 years later, concepts such as obsessed online communities and innovative new branding techniques don't seems fresh any more. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cara | 5/4/2011

    " A super-cool and strangely touching book. I need to read it again to feel like I really have a handle on it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julian | 4/22/2011

    " My first and to this date favorite of Gibson's work. Unusually for me, loved the heroine Gibson devised... In a way am left with the thought that less, with style, is better than more.... A great aesthetic... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tad | 4/19/2011

    " Unbelivable and heartening to me that William Gibson, at his age, could turn out a book so hip. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron | 4/18/2011

    " This might come as a surprise, but this was my first ever William Gibson novel. After reading this one, I am not sure what to make of it. I liked the story, and it certainly kept me guessing throughout. Maybe I need to see more in this series to say for sure. "

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About the Author
Author William Gibson

William Gibson, one of science fiction’s most unique and prophetic voices, is the award-winning author of Neuromancer, Mona Lisa Overdrive, The Difference Engine, Virtual Light, Idoru, All Tomorrow’s Parties, and Pattern Recognition, among others. William Gibson lives in Vancouver, Canada with his wife.

About the Narrator

Shelly Frasier has appeared in many independent film and theater projects in Arizona and Southern California and has done voice-over work for commercials and animation projects. She trained at the Groundlings Improv School in Hollywood and South Coast Repertory’s Professional Conservatory in Costa Mesa, California. She has performed at theaters throughout North Hollywood and Orange County. Recent performances include Blue Window, The Battle of Bull Run Always Makes Me Cry, The Haunting of Hill House, and a British farcical version of A Christmas Carol. She resides in Hollywood.