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Download Padres e Hijos (Fathers and Sons) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Padres e Hijos (Fathers and Sons) Audiobook, by Ivan Turgenev
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (21,039 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ivan Turgenev Narrator: Hernando Ivan Cano Publisher: Yoyo USA Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2006 ISBN:
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Una novela sobre la lucha de generaciones. Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883) fue uno de los grandes novelistas rusos, pero en su obra se adelanto tanto a su tiempo, por exponer problemas sociales mas que psicologicos, que a pesar de sus grandes meritos nunca fue considerado dentro del puesto que merece su brillante produccion. En Padres e hijos, obra que en su tiempo causo grandes polemicas por la forma descarnada como mostraba la lucha entre generaciones, Turguenev muestra el retrato de un joven que busca su independencia negandose a aceptar ninguna autoridad.

Ivan Turgenev was one of the greatest Russian novelists. In his work he was ahead of his time, because he preferred to expose social problems more than psychological ones. Because of this, he was never given the place he deserved. In this book, Turgenev shows the picture of a young boy who looks for freedom and independence.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 2/13/2014

    " Combination silly/fun plot with unabashed commentary in a Jane Austen sort of way that had me saying, "mmm, true," more than a few times. Fun times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 2/11/2014

    " Wonderful insight and examination of the generalational disparities between Russian men of the 1840s and men of the 1860s. A must read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Crystal | 2/10/2014

    " Maybe the best fiction I've read, couldn't put it down and will save to read again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nicholas | 1/31/2014

    " Turgenev creates a prototypical Anti-Byronic, or in this case Anti-Pechorin, figure in Fathers and Sons. Bazarov's nihilism shapes the world, as he distorts and morphs aspects of his life and Nikolai's to uphold the tenants of the "modern" philosophy. He attacks the aristocratic life in Russia and strongly calls for emancipation even though he rejects the peasants as illiterate peons. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chethan | 1/29/2014

    " There is truth in Turgenev's descriptions of intellectual and social interactions, and the conflict between Bazarov's cold, indifferent nihilism and the life that Arkady ultimately chooses is one that deserves attention. Turgenev's mastery of his characters' psychology does not even compare with Dostoevsky's, but the novel is worth reading for the uniqueness of its characters and its 'arguments' against nihilism and the late 19th-early 20th century Russian intellectual movement. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steven Salaita | 1/21/2014

    " I read this one many years ago, in an undergraduate Russian lit phase. It is a superb novel, one of the finest of the nineteenth century. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Karen | 1/12/2014

    " I just did not love this book. Obviously, the subtleties of Russian literature and nihilism are lost on me. I keep trying to read Russians, with little success. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Jellinek | 11/22/2013

    " A gem of a book. This is why I read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 10/31/2013

    " Yeah it's good for you. Nihilism is so entertaining! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 3/24/2013

    " Every man should read this book and consider his relationship with his father and/or son(s). Read in the original "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Newton | 3/9/2013

    " I read this in college and loved it then; about 10 years later, I only really remember the characters (and not particularly well at that). I'll re-read it some day I'm sure; until then, it still gets an honorary 5 stars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carey B. | 3/4/2013

    " sad, very sad, but true. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vasha7 | 2/21/2013

    " A fascinating novel, not only for its portrayal of the ideas of the time, but especially for its vivid characters: the protagonist, but also others. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew Lippart | 8/29/2012

    " The clash between generations, as told through the lens of Russian Nihilism during the 19th century. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dave | 5/4/2012

    " I liked the themes and the characters. I didn't like the way it was written. Go figure. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/5/2012

    " Yes it is a Russian novel. Yes, it reads exactly like a Russian novel. That is what makes it so good. It's poignant even in today's world. Thankfully this one is only 200 pages. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yong Kwon | 8/28/2011

    " "Whoever has not seen such tears in the eyes of a loved one, has not experienced to what degree, overcome by gratitude and remorse, a man can be happy on earth." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allen | 6/9/2011

    " The first Russian classic I ever read. A clash of mid-19th century generations with much that could apply today. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rissi | 5/11/2011

    " Read this in high school and liked it. My first taste of nihilism and it fascinated me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mircea | 4/15/2011

    " Russians knew their way around writing. And seing the opposition between the traditional views on life of the old generation and the subversive new views of the new generation it's always stimulating. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Korneel | 4/10/2011

    " Brilliant book. Typical Russian literature setting, but far more readable than say Dostojevski. Great Story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matthew | 4/10/2011

    " The clash between generations, as told through the lens of Russian Nihilism during the 19th century. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Julie | 4/6/2011

    " I've been interested in Russian novels lately. This one was okay, nothing special. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sara | 2/27/2011

    " This is a great, short and accessible Russian masterpiece. Easy to read and a marvelous look at society there in the 1860's; politics, manners, family relationships. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jake | 2/20/2011

    " Excellent book, now one of my favourites. "

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About the Author
Author Ivan Turgenev

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (1818–1883) was the first Russian writer to gain a wide reputation in Europe. He witnessed the February Revolution in Paris (1848), and his subsequent connection with reform groups in Russia, along with his sympathetic 1852 eulogy of Nikolai Gogol (who satirized the corrupt bureaucracy of the Russian empire), led to his arrest and one-month imprisonment in St. Petersburg. In 1879 the honorary degree of doctor of civil law was conferred upon him by the University of Oxford.