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Download On Human Nature: Revised Edition Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample On Human Nature: Revised Edition (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Edward O. Wilson
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (830 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edward O. Wilson Narrator: Joe Barrett Publisher: University Press Audiobooks Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2010 ISBN:
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This revised edition of Human Nature begins a new phase in the most important intellectual controversy of this generation: Is human behavior controlled by the species' biological heritage? Does this heritage limit human destiny?

With characteristic pungency and simplicity of style, the author of Sociobiology challenges old prejudices and current misconceptions about the nature-nurture debate. He shows how evolution has left its traces on the most distinctively human activities, how patterns of generosity, self-sacrifice, and worship, as well as sexuality and aggression, reveal their deep roots in the life histories of primate bands that hunted big game in the last Ice Age. His goal is nothing less than the completion of the Darwinian revolution by bringing biological thought into the center of the social sciences and the humanities. Wilson presents a philosophy that cuts across the usual categories of conservative, liberal, or radical thought. In systematically applying the modern theory of natural selection to human society, he arrives at conclusions far removed from the social Darwinist legacy of the last century.

Sociobiological theory, he explains, is compatible with a broadly humane and egalitarian outlook. Human diversity is to be treasured, not merely tolerated, he argues. Discrimination against ethnic groups, homosexuals, and women is based on a complete misunderstanding of biological fact. But biological facts can never take the place of ethical choices. Once we understand our human nature, we must choose how human in the fullest, biological sense, we wish to remain. We cannot make this choice with the aid of external guides or absolute ethical principles, because our very concept of right and wrong is wholly rooted in our own biological past. This paradox is fundamental to the evolution of consciousness in any species; there is no formula for escaping it. The book is published by Harvard University Press.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wuenschel | 2/5/2014

    " It's a treatise on how human intelligence and culture are a result of and constrained by biological inheritance. It is well-written and interesting. I love reading E.O. Wilson because it always seems like a glimpse into a brain that is vastly better than mine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Valori | 1/22/2014

    " I read most of this and then realized that it was written too long ago to really be accurate anymore... he mentioned something about computer size and it totally wrecked any credibility he had with me in this book. I think he's an amazing scientist (the founder of Sociobiology) and I love his excitement and continual lust for knowledge. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Noah | 12/29/2013

    " Brilliant book about some reasons why we act and do the things we do from a sociobiological perspective. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Will Boncher | 12/22/2013

    " The chapters on Heredity, Aggression, and Sex were all really good. I'd give the book 5 stars if it was just those chapters, but the rest didn't really do it for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 12/21/2013

    " Interesting book, it's a bit tough to get through but it makes a lot of interesting points. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessie | 12/19/2013

    " I didn't find this to be the most entertaining read, though I found certain parts to be unarguably fascinating! I consider the chapters on aggression, sex, and altruism to be the most gripping overall. I'd give this book only four stars if I felt it fair to rate it on the level of my own absorption, but that's not conducive to a book like this. I can't quite believe it was written in the 70's! And I'd be remiss if I couldn't acknowledge Wilson's brilliance. I'd give it four an a half if it were possible, taking off but a bare sliver for density, but perhaps that's me and not the fault of the book. In the end, I enjoyed it quite a bit. I learned a lot and feel that it was definitely before its time. It was well organized and solidly argued from my perspective. Based on all of the above, I feel it earned five stars on principle. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zrinka | 12/16/2013

    " On human nature - but actually you find out more about E. O. Wilson's nature. Usually he's not nearly as precise as I'd like him to be, and he has the annoying habit of trying to be controversial on purpose, trying to push everyone's buttons. The book is actually a mess of his opinions on pretty much everything. Not what I expected. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brad | 12/11/2013

    " Most of the ideas seem self evident until you consider that this work started the field. Wilson shows remarkable foresight and understanding, both in how his thoughts might be expanded upon, and in how his thoughts might be misconstrued and misrepresented. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Treus | 10/19/2013

    " A brave and well-written survey of some of the things that make us seem quite like animals. This expunds on the 'human' part of the earlier 'Sociobiology' and this is probably the best place to begin for people interested in that controversy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon | 9/5/2013

    " this book outlines seven things that are common to all recorded societies. granted i read it in high school, but it is an extremely interesting and eye-opening book. he's written a bunch of the others, all of which are most likely worth checking out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shelly | 9/5/2013

    " I'm not for biological determinism, but Wilson's prose is undoubtedly convincing, even if his views aren't. I definitely wouldn't give him a dose of pig's blood... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gabriela Shine | 8/12/2013

    " Interesting, interesting and interesting.. Lots of information, it made me change my perspective in many ways. I think this book it's a must read for every psychologist and sociologist. I am glad it will be published in Romanian soon. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 9/3/2012

    " Fascinating examination of human nature from a Darwinian perspective. I especially enjoyed reading his thoughts on religion. "The predisposition to religious belief is the most complex and powerful force in the human mind and in all probability an ineradicable part of human nature." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin | 10/23/2011

    " Groundbreaking fusion of evolutionary biology and anthropology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tai Odunsi | 8/2/2011

    " kin selection expounded! five stars "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe | 1/18/2011

    " This is the most influential book I have ever read. Wilson plants human nature firmly in the soil of history and explains our behaviors with unassailable logic and examples. Read this book to find out who you are. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ian | 10/7/2010

    " In terms of its scientific content, it is fascinating but dated. When the author attempts to tackle morality, ethics, and philosophy, it is deeply unsatisfying. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Noah | 4/6/2010

    " Brilliant book about some reasons why we act and do the things we do from a sociobiological perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wuenschel | 2/1/2010

    " It's a treatise on how human intelligence and culture are a result of and constrained by biological inheritance. It is well-written and interesting. I love reading E.O. Wilson because it always seems like a glimpse into a brain that is vastly better than mine. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Will | 7/29/2009

    " The chapters on Heredity, Aggression, and Sex were all really good. I'd give the book 5 stars if it was just those chapters, but the rest didn't really do it for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 7/13/2009

    " Fascinating examination of human nature from a Darwinian perspective. I especially enjoyed reading his thoughts on religion. "The predisposition to religious belief is the most complex and powerful force in the human mind and in all probability an ineradicable part of human nature." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 J. D. | 11/24/2008

    " I have never read a work by Wilson that I didn't find fascinating,
    including his entomological classic, "The Insect Societies". This one is an evolutionary meditation and speculation on the human mind.
    It is not an easy read, but a rewarding one. "

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