Extended Audio Sample

Download Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (Expanded Edition) Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (Expanded Edition)  (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Richard H. Thaler
3.16 out of 53.16 out of 53.16 out of 53.16 out of 53.16 out of 5 3.16 (32 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Richard H. Thaler Narrator: Lloyd James Publisher: Gildan Media LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain, is that, being human, we are all susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder.

Our mistakes make us poorer and less healthy; we often make bad decisions involving education, personal finance, health care, mortgages and credit cards, the family, and even the planet itself.

Thaler and Sunstein invite us to enter an alternative world, one that takes our humanness as a given. They show that by knowing how people think, we can design choice environments that make it easier for people to choose what is best for themselves, their families, and their society.

Using colorful examples from the most important aspects of life, Thaler and Sunstein demonstrate how thoughtful choice architecture can be established to nudge us in beneficial directions without restricting freedom of choice. Nudge offers a unique new take - from neither the left nor the right - on many hot-button issues, for individuals and governments alike. This is one of the most engaging and provocative audiobooks to come along in many years.

Included in this recording are a bonus chapter and a Postscript that was added in the paperback edition. Download and start listening now!

BK_GDAN_000243

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brentin | 2/16/2014

    " Most of the examples were good, although sometimes using the most extreme case to make a point. Some of the solutions proposed were a little too idealistic, and not viable in reality. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellen Evers | 2/15/2014

    " Great idea, not so great book. Just read the first few chapters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 The Unbreakable | 2/11/2014

    " A brilliant book. Explains the nature in which we present choices are inexplicably unbiased and that there is no neutral way to present choices. Having said that the book goes on to explain the applications in a variety of fields. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Al | 2/6/2014

    " Ultimately this does not amount ot a clear, coherent political philosophy. Its ideas are good but tend to add up to small, although potentially significant, ways of restructuring what we current do rather than thinking through what we actually want to achieve. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica Jarvis | 2/1/2014

    " Simple, thoughtful suggestions to help people make better decisions about health, finances, and lifestyle. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Radovan Janecek | 1/25/2014

    " This book is unbelievable. Especially the beginning is extremely interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roger | 1/18/2014

    " The author, Cass Sunstein, with his moderate approaches, is a good addition to the Obama Administration. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Maciej Matyjas | 12/30/2013

    " Well written, with loads of examples, but you need not read the whole book to understand the concept and philosophy behind it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 May-Ling | 12/9/2013

    " my main takeaway from this book is the power of default settings! encourage good behaviors through default and most people will comply out of indifference or laziness and it will be better for everyone in the long run! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lane | 12/3/2013

    " Cool insights. Draws some of them out but worth the read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John George | 9/23/2013

    " Good read.... Some of the discussion was familiar earlier so was not super excited at the end.. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Connie | 6/1/2013

    " First half is quite repetitive. America-centric, interesting cases, but overall not a designer guide. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kirsty Darbyshire | 4/3/2013

    " Enjoyed this when I read it - have forgotten pretty much everything about it apart from the basic idea that getting people to do the things you want by slightly encouraging that behaviour in some way, probably by making it the easiest option, is a good idea. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 micha Hanson | 2/27/2013

    " Really enjoyed reading nudge. Pretty quick read about decision making. Lots of insights into structuring systems for desired outcomes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelly Nielsen | 2/18/2013

    " This is a book for policy creators, not really the general public. I was hoping for something more like predictable irrationality, which can help you understand your own decision making process. This book instead concentrates on how to affect the decision making process of others. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tyson Titensor | 9/24/2012

    " Nudge is like a Gladwell book based on actual research. Entertaining read and compelling ideas. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Teeni | 6/3/2012

    " Thought provoking. A ton of insight on "choice architecture" and "libertarian paternalism." Sounds awful, but was really interesting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vicki Boyd | 4/13/2012

    " A lot of good info but much of it not applicable to everyone, and very dry reading. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tina Ye | 4/4/2012

    " Never finished this book. Main thesis seems to be thoroughly hashed out in the first third; the rest is detailed case studies in everything from finance to government to health. Might pick it up again someday or use it as a reference if I never have to deal with those specific topics. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Cate | 10/10/2011

    " maybe this book has a powerful message, if so, it was lost on me "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 AC Capehart | 9/5/2011

    " Wow, people are suckers. (Unfortunately, this includes me.) The way we respond to default values, or estimate based on personal experience, or whatever. A neat book on everyday psychology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 tara Zepel | 6/10/2011

    " "Don't Mess With Texas" began as a part of a anti-litter campaign. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison | 5/20/2011

    " In the same vain as Tipping Point, but I love these kinds of books. They are slightly academic while being humorous and insightful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Megatrend | 5/2/2011

    " Spannendes Buch - streckt sich hintenraus ein wenig mit zu vielen Details zum amerikanischen Gesundheitssystem und dergleichen für Europäer weniger relevanten Einzelheiten. Einige Beispiele sind einem auch schon allzu bekannt (Fliege im Pissoir etc.). Dennoch lesenswert. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rob | 4/30/2011

    " I was disappointed with this book. I thought it would have more of a self help bent, but it is actually a banal mish-mash of The Tipping Point and Freakanomics, yet not nearly as engaging as either, and I didn't like Freakanomics either. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erika | 4/28/2011

    " Thaler and Sunstein for President! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 HKd | 4/1/2011

    " An easy read but there's nothing new here and the writing style is very patronising. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Taylor | 4/1/2011

    " It's basically an applied behavior economics. It reminds me of Predictably Irrational, but not nearly as cute. I mean that as a compliment. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Voracious | 4/1/2011

    " Some interesting material, but I found the style irritating. The humour felt patronising.

    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Qi | 3/15/2011

    " I read the sample sending over by Kindle. I am not impressed by the pedantic style of writing. The ideas seem to be rather mundane. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 3/15/2011

    " Great review of social science findings in a readable and applicable format. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saugat | 3/4/2011

    " Much of the content is repetitive if one has read other behavioral economics books. But the authors' takes on Marriage (Privatizing), Savings, Green taxes, etc were new and thought-provoking "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Richard H. Thaler is the Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics and the director of the Center for Decision Research at the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.


Cass R. Sunstein is Karl N. Llewellyn Distinguished Service Professor of Jurisprudence, University of Chicago Law School and Department of Political Science.
About the Narrator

Lloyd James (a.k.a. Sean Pratt) has been narrating since 1996 and has recorded over six hundred audiobooks. He is a seven-time winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award and has twice been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award. His critically acclaimed performances include Elvis in the Morning by William F. Buckley Jr. and Searching for Bobby Fischer by Fred Waitzkin, among others.