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Download Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Richard Thaler
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (8,993 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Richard Thaler Narrator: Robert Bair Publisher: Caravan Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2010 ISBN:
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Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain, is that, being human, we all are susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder. Our mistakes make us poorer and less healthy; we often make bad decisions involving education, personal finance, health care, mortgages and credit cards, the family, and even the planet itself.

Thaler and Sunstein invite us to enter an alternative world, one that takes our humanness as a given. They show that by knowing how people think, we can design choice environments that make it easier for people to choose what is best for themselves, their families, and their society.

Using colorful examples from the most important aspects of life, Thaler and Sunstein demonstrate how thoughtful choice architecture can be established to nudge us in beneficial directions without restricting freedom of choice. Nudge offers a unique new take - from neither the left nor the right - on many hot-button issues, for individuals and governments alike. This is one of the most engaging and provocative books to come along in many years.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Graeme Stewart | 2/7/2014

    " Cass Sunstein is an interesting guy, and this book lays out a provocative approach to using cognitive bias to achieve positive social and economic results. Not without its problems, but an engaging read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jack | 1/28/2014

    " What drove me to select this book initially was its inclusion at the end of an alumni lecture at my 10-year reunion. While there are some interesting case studies, it's questionable whether an entire book needed to be devoted to some of these concepts. I'd hardly say it changed the way I think about the world, as one reviewer put it. Worth picking up, especially if you are involved in any kind of choice architecture, macro-economics or government administration. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ben.sirolly | 1/26/2014

    " For anyone who wants to know what I will be working on and researching for the next few years, read this book. It is a fun and interesting read that gets you to think about policy in a semi-scientifically informed, non-intuitive way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jasmine | 1/23/2014

    " As several of my interim comments have suggested, the overall theme of this book is a good one. Choices are good, but guided choices are better. Some of the topics were foreign and thus a little dry for me, but overall the book was worth reading. I would like to see more of this type of idea and see what comes out of it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kyra | 1/22/2014

    " Maybe it was just me but I knew everything in this book already and didn't think the presentation was so compelling to read about it again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kellie | 1/19/2014

    " I listened to about 1/3 of this book on audio earlier this year. From what I remember, it's about economic paternalism and whether it is appropriate to 'nudge' people into choices that may be good for them. Very interesting, I just don't think I'll finish it anytime soon. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren | 1/16/2014

    " I was initially more optimistic about this book, but it slowly lost me with overly simplistic metaphors and a strict insistence that competition is good for everything. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ajit George | 1/9/2014

    " If ever you appoint me Benevolent Dictator, I am sure that I will be mostly Libertarian Paternalist. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Teri Moote | 1/9/2014

    " If you can't push people into something they don't want, nudge them slowly. Written by our Regulatory Czar. Scary stuff, if you ask me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Taylor | 12/30/2013

    " It's basically an applied behavior economics. It reminds me of Predictably Irrational, but not nearly as cute. I mean that as a compliment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Teresa Kmetz | 12/21/2013

    " Nudge is a well written book about decision making and choice architects. If you have ever wondered why you make certain decisions or how you can influence (nudge) someone's decision - this is the book for you. Easy to read and informative. Great book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peter Jordan | 11/13/2013

    " Liked the ideas, but rather dry "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nora | 7/3/2013

    " Default settings matter.. I need someone with a bunch of degrees to tell me this? Not so sure. Also, these are a bunch of raging capitalists... the gentler, pro-govt kind, but still. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tedjimsmith | 5/20/2013

    " It was an interesting in book in what influences our choices. I did help me choose to put my 401 K contributions on an automatic increase function. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kirsten | 5/17/2013

    " Simple social "Nudges" can change the world and may help people make better decisions for themselves and society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 12/18/2012

    " Great review of social science findings in a readable and applicable format. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eron Ashley | 7/20/2012

    " couldn't finsish... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joey Chiang | 7/7/2012

    " really great book. I loved reading the POV from an economist because he provides practical solutions for today's problems. Albeit today's problems are far more complex and emotional, therefore would not be as easy to solve. But was still great reading from a different perspective. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Suzy | 10/16/2011

    " Reads just like CHES exam prep material...which is why I couldn't finish. I sold all of my textbooks back thankyouverymuch. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mr. Caruso | 8/14/2011

    " Nudge is pretty interesting. Written by an economics professor and a law professor, this is primarily a pitch for a new take on public policy -- one that reflects findings in the recent field of behavioral economics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joy | 7/8/2011

    " Not as quick-reading in style as Gladwell but similar in selection of materials. The smart-ass academic humor tone is probably off-putting to a lot of people. I did start thinking about my retirement plans after reading the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alison | 5/20/2011

    " In the same vain as Tipping Point, but I love these kinds of books. They are slightly academic while being humorous and insightful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Megatrend | 5/2/2011

    " Spannendes Buch - streckt sich hintenraus ein wenig mit zu vielen Details zum amerikanischen Gesundheitssystem und dergleichen für Europäer weniger relevanten Einzelheiten. Einige Beispiele sind einem auch schon allzu bekannt (Fliege im Pissoir etc.). Dennoch lesenswert. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rob | 4/30/2011

    " I was disappointed with this book. I thought it would have more of a self help bent, but it is actually a banal mish-mash of The Tipping Point and Freakanomics, yet not nearly as engaging as either, and I didn't like Freakanomics either. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erika | 4/28/2011

    " Thaler and Sunstein for President! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 HKd | 4/1/2011

    " An easy read but there's nothing new here and the writing style is very patronising. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Taylor | 4/1/2011

    " It's basically an applied behavior economics. It reminds me of Predictably Irrational, but not nearly as cute. I mean that as a compliment. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Voracious | 4/1/2011

    " Some interesting material, but I found the style irritating. The humour felt patronising.

    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Qi | 3/15/2011

    " I read the sample sending over by Kindle. I am not impressed by the pedantic style of writing. The ideas seem to be rather mundane. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 3/15/2011

    " Great review of social science findings in a readable and applicable format. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Saugat | 3/4/2011

    " Much of the content is repetitive if one has read other behavioral economics books. But the authors' takes on Marriage (Privatizing), Savings, Green taxes, etc were new and thought-provoking "

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About the Author

Richard H. Thaler is the coauthor of the bestselling book Nudge with Cass R. Sunstein, and the author of Quasi Rational Economics and The Winner’s Curse. He is a professor of behavioral science and economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and, in 2015, the president of the American Economic Association.