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Download Murder at The Washington Tribune: Capital Crimes #21 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Murder at The Washington Tribune: Capital Crimes #21 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Margaret Truman
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (307 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Margaret Truman Narrator: Dick Hill Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2008 ISBN:
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From senators to summer interns, from all the president's men to all-powerful women, Margaret Truman captures the fascinating, high-wire drama of Washington, D.C., like no other writer. Now this master of mystery fiction takes us into the capital's chaotic fourth estate. At the big, aggressive newspaper The Washington Tribune, a young woman has been murdered. And the hunt for her killer is making sensational and lethal headlines.

The victim, fresh out of journalism school, hoped to make a splash at the Trib - and then a maintenance man found her in a supply closet, brutally strangled to death. The Trib's journalists are at once horrified and anxious to solve the crime before the cops do, and put this scandal to rest. But the Metropolitan Police Department isn't going to let byline-hungry reporters get in the way of its investigation, and soon enough the journalists and the cops have established warring task forces. Then a second woman is killed, in Franklin Square. Like the first, she was young, attractive, and worked in the media.

For veteran Trib reporter Joe Wilcox, whose career is mired in frustration and disappointment, the case strikes close to home. His daughter is a beautiful rising TV news star. As his relationship with a female MPD detective grows more intimate, Joe sees a chance to renew himself as a reporter and as a man. Spearheading the Trib's investigation, he baits a trap for the killer with a secret from his own past.

Suddenly Joe is risking his career, his marriage, and even his daughter's life by playing a dangerous game with a possible serial killer, while a police detective is bending rules for the reporter she likes and trusts but may not know as well as she thinks she does. As Joe's daughter finds herself trapped at the heart of a frantic manhunt, the walls come down between family, friendship, ethics, and ambition - and a killer hides in plain sight. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 2/5/2014

    " Joe Wilcox is a cops reporter nearing retirement. He has been a competent and ethical reporter over the years, but is still looking for that one big story which will leave its mark over the years. He is tested by a murder which occurs right under his nose at his paper. He is tempted to cut corners to sensationalize the story, he succumbs and must bear the consequenses. I started this book a couple of years ago, and quit. Since I am reaching retirement it was painful to read about someone flaming out at the end of their career. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 12/30/2013

    " One of the better story lines. I missed Mac and Annabel with, but this plot had me thinking and really intrigued. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 12/27/2013

    " Published in 2005, Murder at the Washington Tribune, is like Margaret Truman's other mysteries. Superb! There has been a murder in the fictional "Washington Tribune". (All other locals such as eateries, and other landmarks are authentic to D C ) The police are investigating, but the paper starts it's own investigation as well. Enter Joe Wilcox, a veteran crime reporter. He's married, has an adult daughter with a career in broadcast journalism. Joe is in full tilt midlife crisis. He's knocking on retirement's door and feels he hasn't accomplished his career goals. He's desperate to achieve something big before he's forced out by new journalist in a new climate for news. So, when another murder occurs in a park, and Joe is close to the scene, he takes the story. When he gets wind of the theory some might believe this murder was connected with the earlier murder, he starts a series for the paper about the possibility of a serial killer being responsible. Joe's boss loves how the papers start selling and encourages Joe to continue with that theme. But, the cops aren't on board with the theory. They think the two crimes are unrelated. But, the theme through out the novel, explains how down hill journalism has gone. They must compete with 24/7 cable channels, the internet, blogs, and their ability to film news as it's happening. Newspapers don't have that edge. They are less concerned with fact and more concerned with revenue and the bottom line. Whatever sells papers. Joe hate tabloid reporting, but he's getting pressure from upstairs to consider early retirement, so he goes along. On top of all his job pressures, Joe has been contacted by his long lost brother, who has been "away" for 40 years.Everything starts to take it's toll on Joe, who makes a terrible decision, which could cost him everything. The book ends on an uplifting note, showing how our society now responds to scandal. At the time of this publication, Truman couldn't have imagined what would come in the next 7 years, with social media etc. A good authentic, old fashioned murder mystery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Irene | 11/30/2013

    " audio -- nicely paced and a pretty good story "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Peter | 10/5/2013

    " Margaret Truman has made a name for herself writing novels set in Washington Institutions. This is set in the offices and atmosphere of Washington Journalism. It has very nice elements...the struggle over the evolving nature of journalism...print vs TV, young vs old...a strangely compeeling personal story behind crime reporter Joe Wilcox's descent into corruption. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laura Beasley | 10/2/2013

    " Good story but I figured out 2 of the murders fairly easily. She built the story up with twists and turns but then the ending was kind of a letdown. The story kept my interest and she made most of the characters believable. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dhartridge | 9/10/2013

    " Genre fiction, with a dated feel. The conclusion did surprise me. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rebecca | 8/15/2013

    " I wanted to like this a lot more, as I generally like Margaret Truman books, but this one just didn't do it for me. Characters just did things that seemed improbable, and I had a hard time getting into it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 3/23/2013

    " I've read many her Murder books. By far, this is the best!! Is there such a thing as edge of your seat reading? Wasn't sure who was the culprit until the end. I love it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jenny | 2/12/2013

    " This is a mediocre but relatively satisfying who-done-it. This book is fast and easy to read, good for when you need a simple distraction for a few nights. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jerry Della | 2/7/2013

    " Veteran crime reporter Joe Wilcox, who's been feeling the heat from his boss, senses a chance to improve his position by theorizing that a serial killer is at work. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jaime | 11/21/2012

    " Okay, I didn't finish this. In fact, I didn't finish listening to the first disc of the audio book. It just didn't grab me. It's the first Capital Crimes book I haven't enjoyed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet Dahl | 8/19/2012

    " The story line at times was slow, but the ending was a bit of a surprise. Not what I was expecting. I enjoy Margaret Truman's mysteries as they are set around Washington DC. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Quenta | 4/23/2012

    " What could have been an intriguing plot was slow moving and depressing. Probably 2.5 stars. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ruth | 1/6/2012

    " good. more of a plot than someof the others. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lonnie | 11/18/2011

    " stumbled across this book while traveling and finished the book I had brought. Liked her dad as a president (history books not personal life) so thought I would give her writing a try. Liked it quite a bit. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michele | 1/28/2011

    " A wonderful book that has suspense at every turn. There is definitely twists to the book that catch you by surprise. Am anxious to see how it finishes. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/22/2010

    " Not my kind of book but fun for a change. Nice light mystery. good summer read to pass the time but not very intelligent. Flat characters. Overly dramatic, etc. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jan | 10/17/2010

    " I usually really like Margaret Truman's books but this one was just OK. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cindy | 10/6/2010

    " This was not as good as some of the others. It had a phycological thriller component to it and there wasn't as much of the jusicy DC gossip in this. It did manage to keep me turning those pages to find out "Who done it". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hapzydeco | 3/3/2010

    " Perspective look at Washington through journalism. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kris | 1/12/2010

    " a page-turner; first one I've read by Margaret Truman "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Judy | 6/15/2009

    " Suspenseful and creepy. Not sure I'll be able to sleep tonight after finishing this but it was a fun read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barbara | 6/11/2009

    " I'm not a big fan of these books, but this one was interesting to me as a former journalist. It's topical, with the recent cases of newspapers becoming the story themselves, and there are intriguing insights into the world of news gathering. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sandra | 6/2/2009

    " I wanted to be entertained, but too many things did not ring true, not internally consistent, etc. Too bad! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tricia | 1/8/2009

    " This book is not holding my attention, I may pick it up at a later date but for now I'm gonna shelf it. "

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About the Author
Author Margaret Truman

Margaret Truman (1924–2008) won faithful readers with her works of biography and fiction, particularly her Capital Crimes mysteries. Her novels let readers into the corridors of power and privilege, and poverty and pageantry, in the nation’s capital. She was the author of many nonfiction books, including The President’s House, in which she shared some of the secrets and history of the White House, where she once resided. She lived in Manhattan.

About the Narrator

Dick Hill, named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine, is one of the most awarded narrators in the business, having earned several Audie Awards and thirty-four AudioFile Earphones Awards. In addition to narrating, he has both acted in and written for the theater.