Extended Audio Sample

Download Mr. Sammler’s Planet Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Mr. Sammler’s Planet Audiobook, by Saul Bellow Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,367 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Saul Bellow Narrator: Wolfram Kandinsky Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2007 ISBN: 9781455170272
Regular Price: $20.95 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

Mr. Artur Sammler is, above all, a man who has lasted, from the civilized pleasures of English life in the 1920s and 30s through the war and death camps in Poland. Moving now through the chaotic and dangerous streets of New York’s Upper West Side, Mr. Sammler is attentive to everything, and appalled by nothing. He brings the same dispassionate curiosity to the activities of a black pickpocket on an uptown bus, the details of his niece Angela’s sex life, and his daughter’s lunacy as he does to the extraordinary theories of one Dr. V. Govinda Lal on the use we are to make of the moon now that we have reached it.

Beneath this novel’s comedy, sadness, shocking action, and superb character-drawing there runs a strain of speculation, both daring and serene, on the future of life on this planet—Mr. Sammler’s planet—and any other planets for which we may be destined.

Download and start listening now!

BK_BLAK_002419

Quotes & Awards

  • “Listening to Wolfram Kandinsky’s outstanding reading of the novel makes you realize that you should not confuse Bellow with Sammler…Kandinsky’s energetic recording of this provocative novel is full of variety in tone and rhythm; he renders the different voices of the characters so skillfully that one forgets that there is only one reader performing.” 

    Allan Chavkin, Southwest Texas State University 

  • “Kandinsky's voice is the perfect complement to Bellow's carefully polished words and phrases. He deliciously savors and expands upon every nuance…Brilliant in print, this audio production will entice a new generation to experience the wit and intelligence of a work that has matured like fine wine since its introduction in 1970.” 

    AudioFile

  • “[A] welcome addition in audio format. Wolfram Kandinsky reads in a clear, appropriate voice without lapsing into excessive dramatization.” 

    Library Journal

  • Winner of the National Book Award in 1971
  • Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bakul | 2/16/2014

    " A compelling book. I could relate to the way Mr. Sammler looks inside from outside very well. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Catherine | 2/7/2014

    " Given that it won a Nobel prize for literature, I'm sure there's something redeeming about this book, but I couldn't see past the sexist and racist elements to find it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Herzog | 2/5/2014

    " This book just didn't coalesce very well for me. It's populated (over populated?) with characters that never form a very coherent whole. A let down compared to Herzog. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave Moyer | 2/4/2014

    " This is a classic. How Bellow can tell such compelling stories with so little dialogue, over such a short period of time and hold the reader is amazing. This is one of the best. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brooke | 1/24/2014

    " The first 150 pp pretty head-y and hard to get into, but that made the last 150 pp really good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Scott | 1/21/2014

    " Typically perplexing Bellow fare. His neurotic conduit here is Artur Sammler, an aging Holocaust survivor living in New York City. Mr. Sammler is wise, acute, and painfully observant of the twisted humanity that surrounds him in the great city. Plot-wise the story is typically thin; a black effete pickpocket flashes Mr. Sammler, a close friend is slowly dying in the hospital, and he has to deal with recovering a professor's manuscript about H.G. Wells that his daughter had stolen for his sake. However, the book is intensely internal and neurotic. The overall theme of the book is of society spoiling our planet, and the whistful desire to shoot from a rocket somewhere else in the galaxy, clean and untouched, and begin again. Bellow writes prose that is oftentimes turgid and almost unreadable, but there are of course moments here and there of astounding beauty. Sammler's final conversation with Professor Dal in particular, where Sammler is finally able to articulate his thoughts, is equal parts dense, dogmatic, and absolutely shimmering. Read it for yourself, but prepare yourself for a challenging trip. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anewman Newman | 1/18/2014

    " wisdom of the curmudgeon. i love. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathyred | 12/29/2013

    " for bookclub. I enjoyed it much more after our discussion, otherwise it was an ok holocaust survivor book interspersed w/ pointless philosophical essays that went in apparently meaningless circles. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 11/14/2013

    " I was into depressing or "literary" books for a while in 1971. Not sure I would like them today. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Arlo | 9/11/2013

    " A dense intellectual discourse more then a novel. Very thin on plot. Probably could use a re read or two in the future as it's difficult to catch everything in one reading. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Shawn | 7/30/2013

    " I read this for a literature class while studying abroad in Israel. I had a lot of trouble with the dense style and the plot, if I recall, was some what bizarre. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 3/27/2013

    " One of Bellow's best. Up with "Herzog" and "Augie March". "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia | 9/8/2012

    " my favorite book right now "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Zach | 2/11/2012

    " I really liked this. I had an edition with no pictures on the cover. It was a hardback. I think it was green. Green was the best edition. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom Rose | 1/30/2012

    " read in college modern fiction class. entertaining enough "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia Michell | 11/8/2011

    " Depressing but interesting. A close look into the difficulties of the Jewish immigrant after the First World War. Sorry, canot carry on with this review as as Ebay.fr window keeps popping up and making typing difficult "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian Kenneth Swain | 3/12/2011

    " Thoroughly enjoyed Bellows' third NBA-winning (1971) novel, though it was as challenging as all of his work. I've read maybe six of his novels now, but I still say that "Henderson" is his best. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 1/27/2011

    " At times I found this a little tiring, especially towards the beginning, but as it went on I began to love it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 12/20/2010

    " I was into depressing or "literary" books for a while in 1971. Not sure I would like them today. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 12/6/2010

    " read in college modern fiction class. entertaining enough "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 will | 10/10/2010

    " a winding reflection on life and portrait of new york city at the end of the 1960s. i will have to go back and reread this in more than 5 minute stretches during my commute. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bakul | 9/3/2010

    " A compelling book. I could relate to the way Mr. Sammler looks inside from outside very well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Zach | 4/17/2010

    " I really liked this. I had an edition with no pictures on the cover. It was a hardback. I think it was green. Green was the best edition. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Reginacm | 1/26/2010

    " Artur Sammler, sobrevivente do holocausto, cego de um olho, está rodeado por loucura e excentricidade. Resta-lhe reflectir sobre o mundo, a sua evolução e observar a chegada do homem à Lua. Qual será o nosso destino? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathyred | 1/12/2010

    " for bookclub. I enjoyed it much more after our discussion, otherwise it was an ok holocaust survivor book interspersed w/ pointless philosophical essays that went in apparently meaningless circles. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 11/10/2009

    " This is a classic. How Bellow can tell such compelling stories with so little dialogue, over such a short period of time and hold the reader is amazing. This is one of the best. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michael | 7/23/2009

    " I read this book for my American Lit. Class. It's a little too cerebral to be call "pleasure reading." "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow (1915–2005), author of numerous novels, novellas, and stories, was the only novelist to receive three National Book Awards. He also received the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize in Literature, the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction. During the 1967 Arab-Israeli conflict, Bellow served as a war correspondent for Newsday. He taught at New York University, Princeton, and the University of Minnesota and was chairman of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.

About the Narrator

Wolfram Kandinsky (1940–1993) was a popular audiobook narrator whose career spanned the earliest days of commercial audiobooks. He was a familiar voice of the classics for millions of audiobook fans, and his résumé encorporated the greats of American literature, from Mark Twain to Saul Bellow.