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Download Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Sarah Miller
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,217 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sarah Miller Narrator: Terry Donnelly Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2008 ISBN:
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Sarah Miller's accomplished debut presents a fictionalized account of Anne Sullivan's life and her time as Helen Keller's teacher. Arriving at Ivy Green in 1887, Anne was a partially blind orphan who had been tasked with teaching the difficult blind, deaf, and mute girl to communicate. Anne quickly learned, along with Helen, that words are a miracle. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melinda | 2/19/2014

    " LOVED!!!!! Told through the eyes of Helen's teacher. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marianne Franks | 2/4/2014

    " I was glad I read this, because it was just a good solid helen Keller story, but it was a tad boring to me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carrie | 1/29/2014

    " This is a very good book. I especially liked how the author perfectly described how frustrating it is to want something to happen so badly, but it's totally out of your control. I also like this book because it lets you know a lot more about Annie Sullivan, Helen Keller, and her family then the average person knows about the story (which is: Helen Keller was deaf and blind, and Annie Sullivan miraculously taught her to communicate). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gundula | 1/29/2014

    " Helen Keller's story has always fascinated me, and I have seen most of the movie versions of William Gibson's play The Miracle Worker more than once. Sarah Miller's Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller basically tells the same story as portrayed in The Miracle Worker (how Annie Sullivan is able to open Helen Keller's sightless and soundless world to language, to communication and personal interaction), but it is a biographical novel told from Annie Sullivan's perspective, in her voice. For a mostly non-fiction, biographical account, Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller is really quite remarkable in that the narrative reads like a novel. Sarah Miller's writing is outstanding, amazing, capturing (what I would consider) Annie Sullivan's voice, her ideas, her feelings and emotions (the first-person narrative feels like it is Annie relating her story, not the author writing as "Annie"). However, Sarah Miller has not only managed to capture her narrator's voice, Annie Sullivan's voice. No, she has also managed to deliver an authentic, realistic and heartbreaking portrayal of seven year old Helen Keller, of her frustration, anger and isolation (how her parents' indulgent behaviour made this frustration worse, how her parents' actions and lack thereof turned an intelligent little girl, frustrated at not being able to communicate, at being isolated by her blindness and deafness, into a wild, seemingly crazed monster of a child). Annie Sullivan is able to reach through to Helen Keller because she is stubbornly strong-willed and determined to fight for her pupil (even against Helen's family, even when Helen physically lashes out at her). In many ways, Annie understands the girl's anger and frustration, as they mirror her own personality, her own background and history. Miss Spitfire was Annie's nickname at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, where she, a poor half-blind Irish-American orphan was educated. But Miss Spitfire would also have been a good nickname for Helen, at least until Annie is able to break through the barriers of frustration, isolation, and inadequate discipline to "reach" Helen, to teach her the magic of words, of language. I highly recommend Miss Spitfire: Reaching Helen Keller to older children, young adults, to anyone who enjoys engaging, novelistic biographies (and of course, anyone interested in the lives of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan). Sarah Miller truly has a way with words. Annie and Helen are not just stock characters in an informative non-fiction account of Helen Keller's "awakening" they are living, breathing, emotionally nuanced characters, starring in an inspiring story from despair to hope, frustration to joy, isolation to communication. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laeroport | 1/26/2014

    " This was a William Allen White nominee for the state of Kansas. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paige | 1/26/2014

    " I loved this book because I had never heard the story of Helen Keller before and it really interested me. The descriptions were amazing and I really liked how it was told from Annies point of view. Helen Keller must have been really smart but you have to owe her sucsess to her teacher. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 1/7/2014

    " A fantastic piece of biographical fiction about Annie Sullivan, Helen Keller's teacher, and the weeks leading up to the moment at the water pump. Miller has an elegant, flowing style that makes entering Annie's world a joy. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lilly | 12/11/2013

    " This was a very sad book but it showed a real life story that was truly inspiring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jacie Thomas | 11/26/2013

    " I thought this book was very educational because it talked about Hellen kellera life and what it would be like to be blind and deaf an it also talked about what it would be to be Anne Sullivan- the teacher. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Firedragonll | 7/3/2013

    " I listened to the audio book. I really enjoyed it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eloise | 6/11/2013

    " An excellent, though fictional, first-person account of Annie Sullivan's early experiences as Helen Keller's teacher, this book provides insight into the nature of language and of being human. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Carol Patterson | 3/16/2013

    " Boring....zzzzzzzzzzzzzz "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 11/23/2012

    " For fourth-graders maybe but good. A quick, interesting read. I have always liked Helen Keller and this book offered a really interesting perspective. Not my favorite, but I'd recommend it for sure. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Summer | 1/26/2012

    " A great view of Anne Sullivan's perspective of reaching Hellen Keller. Touching at times, showed the great frustrations and almost warfare they struggled through to help Hellen understand life at all. Actually, it was amazing to me. I would own this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maggie McDermott | 12/7/2011

    " I love this book!! Read it! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allison | 11/7/2011

    " very interesting! I enjoyed reading about Anne Sullivan's history too. The author tried to keep it very accurate. This book (I begave reading it to my daughter first) has inspired me to read more about H.Keller & A.Sullivan! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anastasia Tuckness | 9/8/2011

    " A very interesting take on Helen Keller's story. I found the details of life and attitudes of the time pretty disturbing in places but that probably means it's actually realistic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 6/1/2011

    " I was surprised that I liked this so much, as I am not really a history fan (even though this is historical FICTION). However, it was very entertaining and heartwarming to read about the challenges Helen Keller had to overcome before becoming the great leader she was. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lilly | 5/25/2011

    " This was a very sad book but it showed a real life story that was truly inspiring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bailey | 5/18/2011

    " A book with 2 different point of views! I thought it was kind of weird how Helen would act but then I always had to say this to myself before I started reading the book every day... "Remeber Bailey, Helen is deaf and blind." It turned out to be a pretty good book!! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jill | 5/2/2011

    " A very interesting account of Helen Keller's "journey." I didn't realize that she could sign so many words without understanding the concept of language. She was truly a remarkable, gifted woman as was Annie Sullivan. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alison | 4/27/2011

    " An interesting and successful portrait of the woman who unlocked the mind of Helen Keller. I found it kind of creepy, but probably accurate, Annie Sullivans longing for physical affection from Helen. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Janet | 4/16/2011

    " An nice read. But really a repeat of the familiar story of Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller and the water pump. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy | 4/15/2011

    " Story of Helen Keller's childhood transformation told through the eyes of "Teacher." Well written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ledayne | 4/10/2011

    " I bought this for my elementary school-aged daughter at the school boo fair, but ended up becoming engrossed in it. I stayed up late so that I could finish it. Though I am very familiar with the subject, I think Miller has rendered it in a very engaging fashion. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Catherine | 3/22/2011

    " I enjoyed this book more than I thought I would. I found that Miller kept with the spirit of Miss Sullivan in her interpretation. "

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About the Author
Author Sarah Miller

Sarah Miller has written many young adult novels, including Inside the Mind of Gideon Rayburn and The Other Girl. She has also written for magazines, including Details, Men’s Health, Glamour, Mademoiselle, TV Guide, and Philadelphia Weekly.

About the Narrator

Terry Donnelly is a narrator and an actress who has appeared on television in Law & Order. She is the narrator of more than a dozen audiobooks, and her reading of Quentins by Maeve Binchy was a finalist in 2003 for the prestigious Audie Award in the category of Solo Narration – Female. She earned an AudioFile Earphones Award for her reading of The Gathering by Anne Enright in which she was praised for “capturing [the author’s] every subtlety.”