Extended Audio Sample

Download Middlemarch, Volume II Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Middlemarch, Volume II (Unabridged) Audiobook, by George Eliot
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (45,528 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: George Eliot Narrator: Flo Gibson Publisher: Audio Book Contractors Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2006 ISBN:
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This multi-layered novel concerns complex social relationships in a provincial Victorian neighborhood and the struggle to hold fast to personal integrity in a materialistic environment. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia | 2/17/2014

    " The first 100 pages are pretty hard going, but I persisted because this is one of my Dad's all time favourite books. I'm glad I did because this is a beautifully written novel which is remarkably insightful in the way it depicts youth, idealism and, in particular, marriage. It has been a few weeks since I finished reading, and I still keep thinking about Dorothea and Will and Lydgate and poor Rosamond. Worth the effort. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Johnnemann | 2/5/2014

    " Eliot is describing a society a few years prior to her own, it seems, and the contrasts between the two are often meant to mean something to the (presumably contemporary) audience. Sadly, since I'm not familiar with the society, I feel like I'm missing that part of the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 JoAnna | 1/23/2014

    " This book follows a couple of different stories about people who live in or near the town of Middlemarch. It is interesting to get to know the characters individually and then see them interact or think about each other. My favorite stories were about the very virtuous Dorothea and the wordly Rosamond. I didn't know how long the book was, as I downloaded it on my Kindle, so it was surprising to me when I had read for a while and was only at 30%. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 1/15/2014

    " Cannot recall when I read this--in college or later--but sometime in 1990, I copied this out: "You must be sure of two things: you must love your work, and not be always looking over the edge of it, wanting your play to begin. And the other is, you must not be ashamed of your work, and think it would be more honorable to you to be doing something else. You must have a pride in your own work and in learning to do it well, and not be always saying, There's this and there's that -- if I had this or that to do, I might make something of it." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suzanne Bailey | 1/9/2014

    " Really got into this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laurie | 12/30/2013

    " Like Coronation St without the pints and silliness. Loved it. The feelings it evoked have stayed with me over 10 years. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ken | 12/29/2013

    " Pumped up by talk of what a great novel this was, I think I walked into this book expecting a bit much. The story, frankly, did not match the sort of power I expect from a great novel. However, once I realized that wasn't exactly what I was getting I began to enjoy what I had. Eliot (or Evans, rather) writes with a very enjoyable subtle, often sarcastic style which was a lot of fun to read. I marked many passages for their rather clever or funny wording, or deep insight. The narration shows a great deal of psychological insight into the characters, which is what keeps it from falling into being a dull retelling of events. The plot itself becomes rather intertwined, but it is done lightly and it is always the inner lives of the characters that we return to. The book was enjoyable, and I would like to read more by the author to see how she does or doesn't alter her voice for her other tales. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liam89 | 12/27/2013

    " Quite simply the finest novel ever written in the English language. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brent | 12/25/2013

    " I do not remember who it was, some literary figure who read this book every year of their life. It is one that I have read about 3 or 4 times, I think. I love Dorothea. Her transition throughout the novel is a thing of beauty. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jodi | 12/9/2013

    " I did like the book. Though at times I felt it drag. I'm very glad to have read it as many authors reference the book or have it is one of their top books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lynn Jones | 11/30/2013

    " I have never appreciated such a novel before - George Elliot (Mary anne Evans) writes more profoundly of social emotional political human growth than - I dare say - the Brontes. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 John Gomersall | 9/10/2013

    " Hard going. Not sure if this is going to get any better...Need a break "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Grace | 3/7/2013

    " Fantastic. One of my favorite books of all time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ernie | 8/29/2012

    " Worthy of the title of Eliot's masterwork for her extraordinarily well-crafted characters. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Betty | 5/27/2012

    " I found it incredibly boring. I read it in recent years because so many writers refer to it. I became curious so it is helpful in that way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 BookAddict | 2/4/2010

    " Wow, its as grand as they say. What a delight! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margi Harp | 1/31/2010

    " Great insights into marriage... and the mid-19th century. The expository form of the novel at that time in history made it a challenge for me to read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jeanius | 7/6/2008

    " I throw my hands up in defeat with this. I simply cannot get into it and, moreover, don't particularly want to at the moment. I will keep in on the bookshelf and try again some time. After all I had several goes at 100 Years of Solitude and managed it eventually. Good luck with it Mark! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eileen Pucci | 11/11/2007

    " I loved this novel. The story is so intricate and the characters are so fleshed out that you really feel as though Middlemarch and its inhabitants are real. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brett | 2/18/2007

    " Epic...but what happened to Bulstrode? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris Stalnaker | 1/13/2007

    " Listened to it on Audible. So wonderful to knit to. Old-school awesome. "

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About the Author
Author George Eliot

George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Ann, or Marian, Evans (1819–1880), was an English Victorian novelist of the first rank. An assistant editor for the Westminster Review from 1851 to 1854, she wrote her first fiction in 1857 and her first full-length novel, Adam Bede, in 1859. In her writing, she was chiefly preoccupied with moral problems, especially the moral development and psychological analysis of her characters. She is known for her sensitive and honest depiction of life and people in works that are acclaimed as classics.