Extended Audio Sample

Download Metamorphosis Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Metamorphosis (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Franz Kafka
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (161,195 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Franz Kafka Narrator: Dick Hill Publisher: Alpha DVD Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2010 ISBN:
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The Metamorphosis, a novella by Franz Kafka, is often cited as one of the seminal works of short fiction of the 20th century. The story begins with a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, waking to find himself transformed into a gigantic insect. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary Patella | 2/9/2014

    " A story that is short enough to read in a couple of hours, yet interesting and bizarre enough to stay with you for a lifetime. Amount gained from reading is incredible when compared to the short amount of time it takes to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Harry Woodward | 2/7/2014

    " 'The Metamorphosis' is by far one of my favorite short stories and a great incentive for me to read more of Kafka's works, especially 'the Trial'. One of the weirdest and most satisfying pieces of short fiction you are likely to come across, Kafka's little narrative opens with the notorious sentence: 'As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect'. Possibly one of the best opening sentences in fiction, the story just gets better and better as Gregor refuses to accept his transformation and attempts to prepare for his day of work, while being bothered by his family and his boss. When they finally witness his new form, Gregor's family react with horror but they try their best to co-opt this drastic change into their lifestyles. But as Gregor's animalistic behavior and needs place more and more pressure on his family and he fails to communicate with them, he loses his family's support and they begin to see him as a monster. Kafka's characteristic understated style of writing creates superb surreal humor, along with the very human behavior of his characters. At the same time, his story moves you in many unexpected ways, as Gregor and his family struggle with his condition and as their situation rapidly worsens, their hopes and dreams are sacrificed. Once you get past the weirdness and the graphic descriptions of insect parts, this is an emotional attack on the notion of a perfect family, where members are actually struggling with their own selfish desires rather than helping each other. Nevertheless, Kafka's great skill for writing makes you feel for all the characters. To think that such a modern story was written in 1912 and has lost none of its power to move even after translation! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Skip | 2/7/2014

    " For weeks after reading this book, I had strong reactions which came out of nowhere. "How could they be so cruel and in humane?" Yes, Kafka stays with you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristie | 2/5/2014

    " What's not to like? He turned into a big bug... it is fascinating and short. Kafka doesn't waste our time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren Stoolfire | 2/1/2014

    " I listened to the LibriVox audio recording read by David Barnes, who has a very good reading voice by the way. This is one of those stories I wonder why I hadn't read sooner. I know this is probably has major social commentary about the how the evils of capitalism/ materialism are dehumanizing, but I was reading it for what it was on the surface. That is, a young traveling salesman wakes up one morning to find he's turned into a giant insect, can't work to support his family, and finds out how miserable his family is once they realize he can't support them anymore. The ending of the story is pretty depressing to think about...for Gregor's sake not his family's. I loved the touches of absurdist humor in the beginning just after his transformation. One thing I would have liked to see addressed would be the cause of the transformation since that's never really addressed, that could be an entire story on its own. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna | 1/27/2014

    " Wonderfully surreal, poetic work that befriended my attention span and the world of theatre, manifesting in some tremendous visual arts. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jr Bacdayan | 1/26/2014

    " In the first sentence of this book, Gregor Samsa, a travelling salesman mysteriously turns into a vermin (a dung beetle) one morning. No explanation or clue of any kind is given as to why Gregor turned into a bug. With one of the most shocking and interesting openings in modern literature, Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis is a deeply disturbing yet thoroughly eye-opening look into the absurdity of modern life. That people are spending their lives not living as humans but as souls trapped in a vermin-like apparition. That people would suffer alienation and persecution from their loved ones even after spending all their energies and efforts in order that the family may live a decent life. That we are often taken for granted by the people around us. That life would go on even if we die, they may shed a tear of two but after a few moments, they're back enjoying life. That we are just expendable specks in this world. Even though it is relatively short, the themes and questions posed by this novel is so relevant and important to modern life. This work ranks along with the other classical champions. This bizarre masterpiece is the quintessential novel of modern man's problems. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarbjit | 1/22/2014

    " Stories like these always stay relevant. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nayla | 1/18/2014

    " I thought it was a good book but it was very confusing and i wouldn't really recommend this book, unless you like confusing books... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jerrica | 1/2/2014

    " Really not a fan of translated books. I feel like I lose so much. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kellzzz | 12/26/2013

    " Can't figure out the metaphor here. Guy turns into a vermin. It tells how family and others dealt with this change. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Edward Cruz | 12/22/2013

    " The Metamorphosis is an interesting book, but that doesn't make it very good. The entire story is about a man who turns into a giant bug and is confined to his room until the end of the book. That's it, nothing more... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ricardo A. | 12/18/2013

    " A great and stressful story. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Babak | 12/16/2013

    " One of the worst novels that I've read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Toshi | 12/4/2013

    " I wake up a vermin everyday. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 lovelysnorky | 8/26/2013

    " Gregorio es un nombre bonito. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Martin Waterhouse | 7/15/2013

    " Utterly wonderful. A paranoid meta-metaphor with a dark heart but redemption at the end (for the family, at least ...) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Maggie | 1/29/2013

    " sooo i hate this book. it took me like a month to finish this book. and this book doesn't make any sense. what is the point of the book, because you are no yourself anymore, your family will kick you out of the house.... i just totally don't like this book at all "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Abrar Al.fozan | 1/28/2013

    " It was very disturbing and extremely sad. I just couldn't wrap my head around Gregor's transformation. It's too weird and unexplained. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cheryl | 1/11/2013

    " Completely unusual story but enjoyable "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jihane | 8/16/2012

    " This book is a little gem of insight into human behaviour, presented in a metaphor of alienation. I found it very interesting because we see (and understand) the different stages in reaction from both Gregor and his family and how they try to adapt to this new situation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim Wohlfarth | 5/22/2012

    " Mind-boggling and fascinating and scary! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David | 2/28/2012

    " I can like, sense that theres a deeper meaning to this story than what I'm initially taking from it but for sure my big dumb brain can understand that the story about the guy who turns into a bug is ;___; "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anthony | 5/23/2011

    " Hadn't read this since college, which is to say, 40 years ago. So of course I remembered nothing. It was a revelation to realize how simply written but overwhelmingly strange this story is. It really sets the bar for tales of personal alienation within the family and society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juan | 5/23/2011

    " Tan actual en aquel entonces como ahora. No nos convertimos en cucarachas (o escarabajos), porque seguimos siendo lo que somos en nuestros trabajos afines al sistema. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Abbie | 5/22/2011

    " This story disturbed and fascinated me all at the same time. The catalyst is sort of gross, but the metaphor is amazing. I never want to be like his family. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alicia | 5/22/2011

    " Very dense. Very short. Very symbolic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tbergamin | 5/22/2011

    " I read this book when I was fourteen - a long, long time ago - and I still remember it. This book made a lasting impression on me and rate it in the top 5 of books I have ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tiff | 5/21/2011

    " My best friend loved this book and I couldn't understand how or why... I did like this better than The Trial. It's queer... as usual it's Kafka-esque but he hit isolation right on the dot! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany | 5/21/2011

    " The title story is great, of course, but the reason I give this collection a 5 instead of a 4 was because of "A Hunger Artist". "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 5/19/2011

    " Meant something different when I lived with cockroaches the size of puppies... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 5/19/2011

    " I read this story during one of my blissful days as an undergraduate at Bellarmine. It's a great story. It seems like the Republicans are trying to turn most of us into cockroaches without pensions or health care. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marianna | 5/18/2011

    " Interesting. Absolutely deserves more than one read. The critical essays I mostly skimmed, but a few ideas caught my eye. I did not see the three "roomers" as a representative phallus. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Erika | 5/17/2011

    " This edition is half essays about the book, and I did not read the essays. My 4 star rating is just based on the story and the introduction. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 5/17/2011

    " only read the metamorphosis.. found it very interesting, although somewhat strange
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ross | 5/14/2011

    " If you have ever felt like an alien hiding among humanity this is a powerful work on disconnection and self image. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mj | 5/11/2011

    " Hmmm... A little weird - even for an English book. "

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About the Author
Author Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka (1883–1924), one of the major fiction writers of the twentieth century, was born to a middle-class German-speaking Jewish family in Prague. His unique body of writing, much of which is incomplete and was mainly published posthumously, is considered by some people to be among the most influential in Western literature, inspiring such writers as Albert Camus, Rex Warner, and Samuel Beckett.

About the Narrator

Dick Hill, named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine, is one of the most awarded narrators in the business, having earned several Audie Awards and dozens of AudioFile Earphones Awards. In addition to narrating, he has both acted in and written for the theater.