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Download Measuring the World: A Novel Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Measuring the World: A Novel (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Daniel Kehlmann
3.8 out of 53.8 out of 53.8 out of 53.8 out of 53.8 out of 5 3.80 (25 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Daniel Kehlmann Narrator: Rider Strong Publisher: Phoenix Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2006 ISBN:
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The young Austrian writer Daniel Kehlmann conjures a brilliant and gently comic novel from the lives of two geniuses of the Enlightenment.

Toward the end of the 18th century, two young Germans set out to measure the world. One of them, the Prussian aristocrat Alexander von Humboldt, negotiates savannas and jungle, travels down the Orinoco River, tastes poisons, climbs the highest mountain known to man, counts head lice, and explores every hole in the ground. The other, the barely socialized mathematician and astronomer Carl Friedrich Gauss, does not even need to leave his home in Göttingen to prove that space is curved. He can run prime numbers in his head. He cannot imagine a life without women, yet he jumps out of bed on his wedding night to jot down a mathematical formula.

Von Humboldt is known to history as the Second Columbus. Gauss is recognized as the greatest mathematical brain since Newton. Terrifyingly famous and more than eccentric in their old age, the two meet in Berlin in 1828. Gauss had hardly climbed out of his carriage before both men were embroiled in the political turmoil sweeping through Germany after Napoleon's fall.

Already a huge best seller in Germany, Measuring the World marks the debut of a glorious new talent on the international scene. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nimrod Zalk | 2/7/2014

    " Brilliant evocation of Victorian intellectual ambition and its limitations and blind spots. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 1/31/2014

    " You might not guess how lively this book is from the synopsis: the life stories of two German scientists in the 1800's, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt and mathemetician/physicist Gauss, told parallel. But it's a real romp and I'd highly recommend it. There is an English translation available. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mattijs | 1/15/2014

    " Read original: Die Vermessung der Welt. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ghibli | 12/23/2013

    " A very fast read, I couldn't put it down in the end. Truly a remarkable portrait of two great men, but also a philosophical journey; full of humour, but also serious... A book that is very hard to describe, so just read it :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pat | 12/19/2013

    " A german bestselling book. Easy to read, a biography of two of the most famous german scientists from the last few centuries, the mathematician Gauss and the traveling researcher von Humboldt. But..., don't read it. The book leaves you empty. Somehow Kehlmann's descripitions remind me of Garcia Marquez, but less brilliant, less crazy, somehow more made up. In between the pages you recognize two or three popular philosophical subjects, but the author has mixed them in with too much purpose, the book is not breathing them. It's too sleek, to well made, without giving the answer that is being promised throughout the book. Humboldt may have discovered the world - not so the reader. You don't know more about life after this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Luc | 11/16/2013

    " Zonder twijfel een kluifje voor wiskundigen, natuurwetenschappers en... landmeters. Ik daag in elk geval alle winezen uit voor een kritische lezing! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Stella | 11/6/2013

    " Okay. So I have tried and failed miserably to read this book. It started out interestingly enough but I lost interest in the book fast. I don't know why exactly, but something about the book made it extremely tiring to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alastair | 9/13/2013

    " My favorite kind of historical novel, which is to say a good novel that just happens to be set in the past & involve real people. In this case, the scientist-explorer Humboldt (namesake of the squid) & Gauss the mathematician. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann-Sophie | 9/4/2013

    " witzig, klug - einfach wunderbar unterhaltsam. Das Leben von zwei Genies auf so eine humorvolle Art darzustellen, das schafft nicht jeder! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kobeest | 8/16/2013

    " at first this was like reading two books...the stories of the mathematician gaus and the explorer von humbolt went their separate ways. when the two met up though the tone totally changes and kehlmann's flip, episodic style seems to come to life--not always easy to follow, but definitely lively. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick Hadley | 8/17/2012

    " This is about two really funny German guys. I laughed at them and sorta kinda learned that adventure can happen wherever you want...if you're a psychotic genius. So I'll be off to new lands (1 out of 2 isn't enough). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Uschi | 6/17/2012

    " Never thought I'd enjoy a book about science so much, read it nearly in one go. Dry humour and well narrated on the lives of the two geniuses. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Desiree | 2/14/2012

    " "a real example of the pitiful arbitrariness of existence that you were born into a particular time and held prisoner there ... It gave you an indecent advantage over the past and made you a clown vis-a-vis the future." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anna Carr | 1/14/2012

    " Very funny book about Gault and Humbolt "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ramona | 10/19/2011

    " Two scientists become human. Interesting style and subtle (often dark) humor. I wonder what the translation will be like. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karinmoellering | 6/13/2011

    " Loved it! I believe it's historically solid (the author is a historian), some facts were completely new to me (there is connection between the Rio Negro and the Orinoco), and Gauss is just not a nice guy! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mattijs | 6/7/2011

    " Read original: Die Vermessung der Welt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 adriana | 5/29/2011

    " brilliant, magical and hilarious. rich with history and the irreplaceable company of two equally great and eccentric characters. the agile style and touches of witty humor makes it a very pleasant read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lori | 3/15/2011

    " Two grumpy old men recounting their great ambitions and the journeys these ambitions became? It was very funny. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 3/3/2011

    " Inhaltlich gut. Idee gut. Art des Erzählens war definitiv nicht die Weise, die ich lesen möchte. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bennet | 3/2/2011

    "
    I am always amazed to find that a translation reads as brilliantly as the original, but according to my German friend this does. This was pure pleasure to read, for the language, the story, the characters, the humor, everything. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Irene | 2/8/2011

    " Very interesting book about two interesting persons: Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ramona | 2/6/2011

    " Two scientists become human. Interesting style and subtle (often dark) humor. I wonder what the translation will be like. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beth | 12/20/2010

    " I really liked the parts about Humboldt, but Gauss were harder to read. Mostly because he was so antisocial that it hurt. Humboldt wanted to measure the world so he explored it, and Gauss measured the world from his house. Interesting, and good. There are some crude parts. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel | 12/16/2010

    " Interesting but it didn't really grip me for some reason. Both the main characters are eccentric geniuses from start to finish so there's not a lot of character development going on. There is a bit of humour though especially from the Humboldt's poor assistant who increasingly wants to kill him. "

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About the Author
Author Daniel Kehlmann

Daniel Kehlmann’s Measuring the World was translated into more than forty languages. He has received numerous awards, including the Candide Prize, the Literature Prize of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation, the Heimito von Doderer Literature Prize, the Kleist Prize, the WELT Literature Prize, and the Thomas Mann Prize. Kehlmann divides his time between Vienna and Berlin.