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Download Mary Barton Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Mary Barton Audiobook, by Elizabeth Gaskell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (4,597 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Elizabeth Gaskell Narrator: Maggie Ollerenshaw Publisher: The Copyright Group Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2011 ISBN:
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There are stark differences between rich and poor in the Manchester of Elizabeth Gaskell's novel, Mary Barton. Factory owners such as Mr Carson, do not understand the anger of their poverty stricken workers, and care little for their welfare. For the mill-workers, employment means food on the table and being one step away from starvation, but trying to gain any political power means risking a loss of livelihood. The author does not depict the owners as intrinsically wicked, but shows through her writing that it is characters like The Barton's who deserve the reader's sympathy. By the end of the novel, Mrs Gaskell proves that the rich need not be heartless.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erica | 2/14/2014

    " I loved this book... I had to read it for class and once I started I couldn't put it down... It's a great read for those people that love powerful endings:) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joanna | 2/12/2014

    " Murder, prostitution, blindness, a melodramatic love story - what more could you want from a Victorian novel? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shu Chadwick | 2/7/2014

    " I'd forgotten how good Mrs Gaskell is. Mary Barton made me want to re-read North and South, her brilliant novel of the textile trade during the Industrial Revolution. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mindy | 2/1/2014

    " I found little to enjoy about this book. The characters are vapid...the insight I gained into their lives and motivations was inadequate to capture my interest and concern. I would not recommend it. I left the book feeling unconvinced that Elizabeth Gaskell truly cared about the social issues she wrote about. On second thought, maybe she did care, but she had not really made a conclusion about it and thus didn't have a cohesive point to make. I wasn't sure what to conclude at the end of it all, and didn't really care. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clare | 1/19/2014

    " I read this for study and really enjoyed it, it crosses over many genres and its a really enjoyable read :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dawna | 1/9/2014

    " Love this era authors. Wish there were more. Everything by Elizabeth Gaskell is great! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Al | 1/7/2014

    " Not as good as "North and South", this seemed to indulge in melodrama rather too much in the middle section. The eponymous heroine does not hold as much interest as some of the surrounding characters, particularly a rather irritable mother who seemed very much drawn from real life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Lou | 1/5/2014

    " A haunting and beautifully glorious tale of wretchedness and restoration and a fine exploration of Carlyle's 'Captains of Industry.' Industrial socialism at its most harrowing and a good read indeed. I deeply recommend it to all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natalie Banta | 1/5/2014

    " I liked it, but not as much as her others. Her female characters in this book annoyed me. All were gentle and soft and prone to fainting. Ugh. But it was still a captivating story, full of moral ambiguity and tender moments. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kucing | 12/21/2013

    " Being patient is the hardest work we, have to do through life. Waiting is far more difficult than doing; but it's one of God's lessons we all must learn, one way or another... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 the_gunners_babe | 12/4/2013

    " It's a great book. It tells about the life in England during the Victorian era where the social classes mattered and created a wide gap in society and crimes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 C | 11/6/2013

    " The story was great but got a little ridiculous at parts....could have been about 10 chapters shorter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tdraut18 | 11/4/2013

    " An interesting look at the working class in Manchester. I really enjoyed this book. Gaskell uses vivid details that really make me feel for the characters. It's not an epic romance like "North & South" but it's a good book, definitely worth a read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeni | 7/18/2013

    " I always enjoy Elizabeth Gaskell! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ronda | 3/21/2013

    " I love reading stories set in this time period. This story has strength of character and strong morality, compassion and forgiveness. I love it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 8/28/2012

    " It took me three attempts to finish this book. It is an example of my perseverance. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 11/25/2011

    " Rather long, draggy, melodramatic, and didactic--and all without having an especially engaging plot or characters. It would be easier to list the characters who didn't die of starvation rather than to list those who did. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carolyn | 10/31/2011

    " I appreciated Gaskell's fair treatment of the relationship between the the factory owners and workers. She showed both sides and recommended communication and understanding as a way to acheive a mutually beneficial relationship. Sounds trite but doesn't seem to happen nearly enough today. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Natasha | 6/4/2011

    " Her first novel. Entertaining, but wordy. My understanding is that her work was serialized by Dicken's in his Household Words magazine and it reads as such. As in North and South Gaskell examines the relationship between mill workers and the owners, poverty, love and social justice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 6/1/2011

    " what a lovely story about charity and love for all people "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christie | 5/5/2011

    " The first time teaching this...and it was SO MUCH BETTER than I expected. Not that the students loved it, but the discussions were fabulous and well worth the attempt to teach a social problem novel. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 3/3/2011

    " Glad I read it but a bit melodramatic for my taste. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie | 2/5/2011

    " I enjoyed this book in spite of its depressing setting because it gave me insight to what kind of life my great great great grandmother led in England before immigrating to the United States. It also illustrated the strength and weakness of the human spirit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kerry | 1/29/2011

    " Liked it. I love the minutiae of Victorian life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 1/6/2011

    " I'm so squeamish, I didn't like the murder part, even though it was very brief. Loved Job's character and the Christian commentary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kami | 11/10/2010

    " I loved North and South, so thought I'd try another Elizabeth Gaskel novel. This book felt like a repeat of North and South several times, with the issues between the unions and masters in the cotton mills. The end got better, but I wouldn't read it again. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura | 11/8/2010

    " I found Mary to be an idiot and I think the idea was done better in North and South. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Staff Favorites | 11/4/2010

    " This is the author's first novel and the lessons that one learns about class structure and the haves and have-nots will remain vivid in the reader's mind for a long time. --Joni "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janna | 11/1/2010

    " Gaskell is a favorite author. I thought this was a good novel. From a modern perspective the amazing recovery from near blindness was a stretch. I liked the ending. "

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About the Author
Author Elizabeth Gaskell

Elizabeth Gaskell (1810–1865) was an English novelist and short-story writer born in London and raised in Knutsford, Cheshire, which became the model for village settings in her novels. In 1832 she married William Gaskell, a Unitarian minister. Her first novel, Mary Barton, published in 1848, was immensely popular and brought her to the attention of Charles Dickens, who solicited her work for his periodical, Household Words, for which she wrote the series subsequently reprinted as Cranford.

About the Narrator

Maggie Ollerenshaw’s theater work is extensive, ranging from several Alan Ayckbourn roles, to Martha in Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Similarly, her many television credits cover Open All Hours and The House of Eliott, to a BAFTA nomination for her performance in Last of the Summer Wine. She has written for radio and has written and performed a one-woman musical play about Vera Lynn titled Yours Sincerely.