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Download Major Barbara (Dramatized) Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Major Barbara (Dramatized) (Unabridged) Audiobook, by George Bernard Shaw
3.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 53.93 out of 5 3.93 (28 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: George Bernard Shaw Narrator: Kate Burton, Roger Rees, J. B. Blanc, Matt Gaydos, Brian George, Hamish Linklater, Henri Lubatti Publisher: L.A. Theatre Works Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2009 ISBN:
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Barbara is a major in the Salvation Army - but she's also the daughter of Andrew Undershaft, a man who's made millions from the sale of weapons of war. The real battle, however, rages between between the devilish father and his idealistic daughter as they answer the question: does salvation come through faith or finance? This sparkling comedy traverses family relations, religion, ethics and politics - as only Shaw, the master dramatist, can! Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maria | 2/16/2014

    " Again, if you're into literature, you must read the classics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa Martin | 2/15/2014

    " Great social commentary. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barbz | 2/6/2014

    " This was a really good play. The characters are great and I love the snarky social commentary. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 1/29/2014

    " Awesome play for when you're in the mood to do some heavy contemplation. This was my introduction to Shaw, and I wasn't at all prepared for what a brilliantly subversive mind he has. Shaw is a socialist who views poverty as the worst sin mankind can commit, wishes to abolish all forms of punishment except the death penalty, and spends much of the play attacking the methodology of the Salvation Army, and, by association, most other Christian organizations as well. He attacks capitalism and reviles government, disses on police, and tries to make us view terrorists in a more begnign light. This is would all be very offensive to me if it was done in a ham-fisted kind of way, like how Michael Moore would approach it. However, Shaw is a genius with words and ideas, and he presents well-thought out reasons and explanations for everything he says. Even when I don't agree with his conclusions, I have to admire the persuasiveness of his arguement and the fluidity of his thinking. I also admire him for being his own person and bucking the system, especially since he is doing so because of personal convictions and not just to sound cool. One thing he did convince me of, though, is that I need to read more plays... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Heather | 1/24/2014

    " I believe, if I recall correctly, the moral of this play is: the Salvation Army is bad. Is that it? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike | 1/20/2014

    " This is now the third time I have read Major Barbara for it stands as the ultimate question/answer primer on the necessity of war and the arguments against it. Essentially it is about a young woman who is a Salvation Army girl and her father, the world's largest arms dealer. Their tete-a-tete and the explosions that happen in the relationship have inspired many other books, plays and essays. If you can only read two plays by Shaw, let it be Pygmalion and Major Barbara. If you only read one, let it be Barbara. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emily | 1/18/2014

    " William Blake + mysticism + Modernism + Crazy Hippie Professor + Attack on Christianity + Shaw = Fun Converation "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoffrey | 1/18/2014

    " I thought it was interesting, but not my favorite of his plays. Ideas presented are still quite controversial. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brad | 12/25/2013

    " Shaw's satiric bite on war profiteering and the contradictions faced by war opponents is highly apt in the era of Cheney and Halliburton, Move On and Michael Moore. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Grete | 12/17/2013

    " If I were an apologist or a philosopher I would enjoy grappling with Shaw, but as it is I mostly find this play disturbing, as it tosses around questions about salvation, right/wrong/morality, and violence. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert Cross | 10/30/2013

    " Sad truths about money and greed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rolls | 10/24/2013

    " Another great one by a guy who was on a roll. As heartfelt as it is humorous. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 10/10/2013

    " Love GBS "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 محمد عبادة | 3/17/2013

    " May I remind myself here to re-read it?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jamie | 6/13/2012

    " Read and saw this one in London during my first study-abroad stint. Loved it! Plus, plays are great to read since they're so short. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Tuley | 5/14/2012

    " I always thought that Shaw's personal arrogance shone through his writings, but I also think that he was a terrific amateur psychologist who could take ponderous themes and make people want to buy tickets to see them on the stage. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith Davis | 3/30/2012

    " Shaw addresses issues of economic practicality in conflict with moral idealism. Barbara needs money to run her Christian mission and is offered it by the biggest arms manufacturer in England, but is money just money or is it tainted by its source. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Alex | 3/24/2012

    " Too long-winded and couldn't understand what the people at the Salvation Army were saying. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 3/11/2012

    " This is play and is quite interesting. It kind of depicts social welfare in the form of the Salvation Army and Industrail Capitalism. Who will come out on top? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Duane | 1/25/2012

    " Really enjoyed the philosophy on religion and morality. Adolphous is the most interesting character. Any dialogue between him and Undershaft is worth re-reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lisa | 1/16/2012

    " I read this book in high school, and I found the questions in the book, "does it matter how money is made, as long as it is for a good cause?" The story was very intriguing and thoughtful. I have tried to reread it to rekindle my feelings for the book, but I was unable to get through it again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 4/18/2011

    " What a great find!!! Hilarious and I think still relevent!!! Loved it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 A. | 4/4/2011

    " Shaw's play has great insight into the financial benefits of war and the challenge of maintaining hegemony, especially within a business. It also has a lot of heart to it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carma Chemezova | 3/28/2011

    " An interesting read contemplating the importance of religion and whether there is much value or honor in christian ministries converting the poor with promise of food and shelter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Martin | 3/6/2011

    " This was my first exposure to George Bernard Shaw and so I did not know what to expect. I found this book very funny. It is a quick read, and even though it was written in 1905, it is still relevant today. A bold commentary on society and the hypocrisy that pervades it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Iman | 6/23/2010

    " Deserves to be read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joselynn | 6/2/2010

    " An English world advancing towards radical change. Captivating writing style. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 3/31/2010

    " One of my favorites. Shaw is captivating in his interpretation and perception of human relationships. "

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About the Author
Author George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950), Irish-born playwright, critic, and political activist, began his writing career in London. In addition to writing sixty-three plays, his prodigious output as critic, pamphleteer, and essayist influenced numerous social issues. In 1925, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature and in 1938 an Oscar for the movie version of Pygmalion.