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Download M. Butterfly (Dramatized) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample M. Butterfly (Dramatized) Audiobook, by David Henry Hwang
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (4,084 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Henry Hwang Narrator: John Lithgow, B.D. Wong, David Dukes, Margaret Cho, and full cast Publisher: L.A. Theatre Works Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2007 ISBN:
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John Lithgow and B.D. Wong here recreate their original roles from the Tony Award-winning production. Inspired by an actual espionage scandal, a French diplomat discovers the startling truth about his Chinese mistress. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 2/11/2014

    " Hwang's reimagination of Madama Butterfly is a stunning fictionalized account of the bizarre, tragic and true tale of Shi Pei Pu and Bernard Boursicot. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mare | 1/5/2014

    " Based on a true story, where diplomat Rene Gallimard recalls his time with Song Liling, the beautiful Chinese diva. This ideal woman of his was, however, a spy for the Chinese government. They had a twenty-year affair...where his love blinds him from some shocking truths about Song Liling. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wiggle | 1/1/2014

    " I find I can't call this "gay-friendly" or "men-loving-men". In truth, it's neither. But it is amazing, incredible, breathtaking. I hope to see it performed live one day, but I fear the play has gone out of fashion. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shanti | 12/23/2013

    " Love blinds a person; a person in love sees only what they want to see. A tragic twist in the end leaves the reader asking how one could be so blind?! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tiffany Wang | 12/20/2013

    " One of the most intriguing plays I have read in a long time. I adored the plotline -- I thought it was creative and provided a great platform to explore gender, sexuality, and modern-day Asian American cultural stereotypes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsay | 12/15/2013

    " This is an amazing, amazing play. I've read it, and seen it performed, and watched the movie (not so good). Hwang is a genius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stuart | 12/13/2013

    " A well-paced, fascinating little play about so many things you think Hwang's story would collapse under the weight, but he props up the disparate and controversial themes with deftly drawn characters who keep us invested and ring true despite most of them appearing for only one or two scenes. Everything dances around the central figure of Gallimard, who is as bizarre as his story demands and yet totally believable- even relatable. Not just a CRYING GAME knock off, the ultimate reveal about Song is not so much his sex (because it's hinted at from very early on) but his true nature, bringing home the ubertheme of how we rarely see, when we are in love, the truth about someone else until it's long past. Even if you find Hwang's theories of racism far-fetched (and some of them are, in my opinion) I completely buy that someone simply sees what they want to see because it appeals to them to do so and when Gallimard turns on Song at the end and denounces the simplicity of his race and culture based explanation there is almost something triumphant in it, as if Hwang is suggesting that perspective is often it's own tunnel vision trap. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caleb Liu | 12/3/2013

    " Read this at one standing (as opposed to sitting) in a bookstore. This is a play that has to be watched as it is impossible to garner the depth of the interplay between the characters from the page. This is ultimately a grand story of deception after all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 B | 10/16/2013

    " Take some basic issues like global politics, colonialism, race, sexuality, and gender turn them on their head, and you are left scratching yours while holding a great play. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryn | 10/2/2013

    " Why do I love plays about gay male butch-femme relationships and socialism? But I do. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 9/29/2013

    " I liked teaching this a while back (if I remember right). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brittany | 9/26/2013

    " Great play! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ana Lane | 9/25/2013

    " my absolute favorite play!!! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ke Huang | 9/18/2013

    " It may be a little bit preachy but I like it. There are some jokes that don't work (about actors) but most of the time he is insightful. He says interesting things about gender, race and politics. I don't agree in everything about deceit and beauty. I think it undermines motherhood. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Russell | 9/11/2013

    " a great play to read. You think the topic has been done all ready but not really. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patti | 5/31/2013

    " Thought-provoking exploration of gender. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liesel | 1/30/2013

    " AHHHHHHHH! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 2/18/2012

    " This book reminded me of Miss Saigon except the main character turns out to be homosexual. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 James | 5/24/2011

    " This was hilarious to read as an undergrad freshman in a general requirement english class. A great work which some people apparently can't handle. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alex M. | 5/6/2011

    " Interesting, but problematic. Reinforces the gender binary. Ugh, ask me about it sometime, I'll talk. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ke | 4/10/2011

    " It may be a little bit preachy but I like it. There are some jokes that don't work (about actors) but most of the time he is insightful. He says interesting things about gender, race and politics. I don't agree in everything about deceit and beauty. I think it undermines motherhood. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andria.m.olson | 4/1/2011

    " used this for my senior thesis... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nia | 1/29/2011

    " This is a very intersting story, most intriguing because it is based on a true event. The racial implications of the event allude the the reasons why the main character was decived for so long. If you have not read it READ ABOUT IT! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brianna | 5/26/2010

    " A really beautiful play that integrates aspects of "Madame Butterfly." The language is wonderful, and I can only imagine what it would look like staged! "

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