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Download Lives of the Twelve Caesars Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Lives of the Twelve Caesars Audiobook, by Suetonius
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,607 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Suetonius Narrator: Derek Jacobi Publisher: Naxos AudioBooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2005 ISBN:
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Suetonius wrote his Lives of the Twelve Caesars in the reign of Vespasian around 70AD. He chronicled the extraordinary careers of Julius, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Vespasian, and Domitian and the rest in technicolour terms. They presented some high and low times at the heart of the Roman Empire. The accounts provide us with perspicacious insights into the men as much as their reigns, and it was from Suetoniaus that subsequent writers such as Robert Graves drew so much of their material. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryn Hammond | 2/19/2014

    " The mad, the bad and the dangerous to know. I don't care if he's a gossip. It's hilarious, and I gluttoned on the worst bits in my teens. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel Worley | 1/28/2014

    " The Twelve Caesars has very mature material... some information which I didn't feel that I necessarily needed to know about the personal lives of the Caesars... Oh well. The book was well-written, though! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brian Fagan | 1/24/2014

    " Should be read by anybody who wants to see politics at their dirtiest. As fucked up as things are today, we haven't reached the heights of depravity as these boys did in ancient Rome. There's a lot of blood in this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maria | 1/16/2014

    " This was an ok listen. I don't think I would have liked it as much as a read. It was a bit confusing but I was really only interested in the scandal and drama so I enjoyed it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Helena | 1/8/2014

    " I used one particular chapter in this book for describing some events in my debut novel Pont du Gard. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 1/6/2014

    " Reading this book makes me kind of thankful that the sociopaths who we choose to govern us are relatively harmless men with only strange dreams of imperialism and desires for fame, riches, and adulation. Sure we have a Vice President who shot a friend in the face and who brazenly admits to authorizing acts that make him a war criminal, and yes there are Greek bastards who have made a living off of sanctioning genocide for their own twisted ends, and this is just naming two high points in the Hall of Fame of War Criminals that we have allowed to consistently run and or advise this country for the past forty years or so. Yes we have allowed a constant stream of sociopaths to be our guiding light for so many unbroken years (I'm trying to come up with a number, I'm having trouble figuring if Carter and Ford were war criminals, all the rest of the leaders since Reagen have been, and the ones before Ford going back quite a bit were too, oh it hurts the mind to think of all the charges our living former leaders could face at Hague and which would put nooses around their necks). We have our fair share of these people, but not one of them even holds a candle to 11 out of 12 of the leaders of Rome covered in this book. Even the 'nice' ones still had a brutality to them that would make Jeffery Dhamer probably say, 'hey wait a minute that shit is just fucked up.' Rape, murder, torture, incest, more torture, more murder, all kinds of killing of family members, add some more torture and then throw in a whole bunch of sexual deviancy and you get the outlines of the Caesars. Fun times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melissa | 1/6/2014

    " Terrifically entertaining even though quite a lot of it is unfounded rumor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 12/7/2013

    " If your a history, human nature, or TMZ fan. You'll like Suetonius. Fascinating read. The Roman emperors were demigods. This book could read like any biography of powerful men during any age. Kinda of an ancient Tell All for the Caesars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian | 11/22/2013

    " Definately entertaining. Basically an ancient tabloid. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 kiraniumbra | 5/30/2013

    " I've loved this book since my History teacher put me onto it way back in high school. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Calilibrarian | 5/1/2013

    " Suetonius is the best of the biographers in terms of not dancing around facts in fears of losing their skin. He covers Roman leades Roman "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laura Loveday | 3/21/2013

    " Basically, it's an ancient National Enquirer, but there are gems within the gossip and the gossip is fun to read anyway. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Holly | 2/25/2012

    " Read this on the beach in Jamaica after I finished Robert Graves' 'Claudius the God'. Both highly recommended! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paulkelly05 | 1/13/2012

    " I enjoy ancient Rome this was an enjoyable book. Starts with Julius and continues on. Brings them to life very well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bcoghill Coghill | 9/5/2010

    " meandering thru as the mood strikes. Mostly Sunday afternoon reading. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nathan | 9/29/2007

    " Contemporary Roman history (with a good bit of editorializing by Suetonius), readably and eloquently translated. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katharyn | 9/10/2007

    " Read for HISTAM 313: The Roman Empire "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Armstrong | 8/23/2007

    " Loved it...but you'd have to love Roman history to enjoy it. It's long, but I loved hearing the story of the Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 B.R. Stateham | 4/1/2006

    " Frankly, I'm an ex-History teacher, so I eat these kinds of books up for dessert. By modern standards of form an style this book is very stodgy in construction. But the images Suetonius paints of these twelve emporors is fascinating! "

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About the Author
Author Suetonius

Suetonius (AD 69–AD 122?) was a Roman biographer and antiquarian whose writings include De viris illustribus (“Concerning Illustrious Men”), a collection of short biographies of celebrated Roman literary figures, and De vita Caesarum (Lives of the Caesars). The latter book, seasoned with bits of gossip and scandal relating to the lives of the first eleven emperors, secured him lasting fame.

About the Narrator

Sir Derek Jacobi has had a long and distinguished career. He has toured in Becket and Uncle Vanya, and he received a Tony Award for his performance as Benedick in the RSC’s production of Much Ado about Nothing. His work in television includes the lead roles in Cadfael and I, Claudius, and his film credits include Henry V, Gosford Park, and Hamlet. His narrations have won him eleven Audiofile Earphones Awards.