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Download Live and Let Die Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Live and Let Die Audiobook, by Ian Fleming Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.00019 out of 53.00019 out of 53.00019 out of 53.00019 out of 53.00019 out of 5 3.00 (7,000 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ian Fleming Narrator: Rory Kinnear Publisher: Ian Fleming Ltd. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The James Bond Series Release Date: September 2014 ISBN: 9781481508667
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When 007 goes to Harlem, it’s not just for the jazz. This is the kingdom of Mr. Big, master of crime, voodoo baron, and partner in SMERSH’s grim company of death. Those Mr. Big cannot possess he crushes—like his beautiful prisoner, Solitaire, and her would-be saviors James Bond and Agency man Felix Leiter. All three are marked out as victims in a trail of terror, treachery, and torture that leads from New York’s underworld to the shark-infested island in the sun that Mr. Big calls his own.

This audiobook includes an exclusive bonus interview with Rory Kinnear.

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Quotes & Awards

  • Live and Let Die is one of Ian Fleming’s best plots, hard-hitting and violent in a way that none of the others are. The writing displays the author’s confident ability to sweep the reader along at a breakneck pace with an engaging rhythm and flow.”

    Raymond Benson, author of High Time to Kill

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark | 2/9/2014

    " These books are fun. I have always enjoyed the movies and the books are timeless. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelley Ridings | 2/5/2014

    " This wasn't one of my favorite Bond stories. I was very disappointed in some of the racist comments and undertones in the book. The story dragged a little as well. An interesting conclusion though with some classical typical Bond moments throughout. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mike Jensen | 1/27/2014

    " Thinking I would see the new James Bond movie, I wanted to read one of the novels to get a sense of how what Ian Fleming did was different than what the movie does. I'll mostly leave that aside except to note that the film is nothing but overblown texture, and the book is nearly lacking in texture of any kind. Fleming was a terrible writer, so bad that I must read another of his books sometime to try and figure out why he appeals to so many. There is virtually no style, his characters are paper thin, and it was fully a quarter into the book before he added anything like a plot point. There is some small energy to the action scenes, and I did find myself curious perhaps twice about what would happen next. If this book had a different protagonist than James Bond, in other words, if it were not part of the Bond series, nobody would read it. The second star is simply because it is part of the series, and so provokes curiosity. I read the old Perma Books edition, not the Penguin edition pictured with this review. Maccbeth reference in chapter 4, and Shakesperae quotation in chapter 9. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Norm Minekime | 1/27/2014

    " This is the second of the Ian Fleming Bond books. Although there was more and better action in this book than Casino Royale, I did not enjoy it nearly as much. In particular, the book is a very racist reflection of the times it was written. Bond's adversary is a black gangster from Harlem, who also happens to be a Soviet agent. He uses Voodoo to control a large part of the African American population of the US, expecially Pullman porters and cab drivers. All the African American characters speak in a dialog straight out of 1930s and '40s movies, and there is an especially tasteless chapter where Bond and Felix Leiter (of the CIA) sit in a restaurant in Harlem and eavesdrop on an African American couple having a conversation. I would suggest skipping this book in the series for this reason; it isn't really necessary to read this one to enjoy the next one, Moonraker. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Buzz Borders | 1/21/2014

    " Of much less quality than Royale. I was a bit disappointed the way he stretched the plot on and on to a rather cliche ending. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jacob | 1/15/2014

    " Live and Let Die is the second James Bond novel by Ian Fleming. It deals with the rise of the African-American Gangster and Voodooism and reading it more than fifty years after the time it was written, the culture shock can be intense. The way Fleming throws around descriptions of the black gangsters and goes around painting certain characters as typically "negroid" can leave the reader shell-shocked. In the context of its time period it may have been accepted but in today's politically correct society such descriptions are jarring and take away from the narrative. It is hard to get lost in the story when you're so amazed that society viewed a section of the population through this sort of lens. I'm sure all sorts of essays have been written about the racism in Live and Let Die, but the simple fact of the matter is that it is simply a book of its time and arguing about it doesn't do anything to alter the content of the book at all. It is the first sequel in a series featuring one of the most prominent characters in pop culture history and there is enough there to see why several more stories were yet to come. The novel deals with a shadowy criminal figure named Mr. Big who found himself allied with the Russian spy community after World War II which he had spent working for the American secret service in France. He has the same sort of intelligence background that 007 has without being painted as a "spy." Here, James Bond is fighting a criminal mastermind with tactics normally reserved for fighting other spies. As such, it gets those around him hurt, namely his friend Felix. I feel as if the choice of the villain and his tactics was meant by Fleming to show the versatility of 007 as a character. That his opposition wouldn't be repetitive communist strawmen. In that regard, the book is quite good. Even Mr. Big's plan comes across as somewhat original and lucrative. The best part of the book is truly the villain, as the threat of his power feels palpable. Contrast all of this with the film version, which shares very little in common with the book that shares its name. Part of that comes with twenty years in between the release of the novel and the film, turning Mr. Big into a caricature mired in Blaxploitation tropes. We never really even see that much of him in the film. The intimidating presence so well displayed in the novel is lost in the adaptation. His plan is also overly simplified, trading hidden gold treasure for heroin fields. Live and Let Die is a horrible when viewed as an adaptation. It is a serviceable James Bond film, but only when completely divorced from his literary counterpart. When stacked up against the debut of Casino Royale, Live and Let Die is a bit of a misfire in some regards, but still an interesting book and well worth reading for anyone who wants to dive into the depths of the James Bond canon. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 JW | 1/12/2014

    " More action than Casino Royale, but a lot of internal monologuing about black people might be uncomfortable to delicate modern sensibilities. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Gallear | 12/18/2013

    " Another very exciting and thrilling Bond book but be warned, the language is very of it's time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robin | 12/8/2013

    " Bond is so much different than the movies. He is so real. Lot of action. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Arpana | 10/3/2013

    " I pigged out on these when I was about fifeteen. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carlos Turnbull | 9/16/2013

    " I named my son after Mr. Fleming... so I guess anything I say will be bias. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hannah Wilkes | 8/22/2013

    " Possibly my favorite so far. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Manney | 8/3/2013

    " So rich in description and colour. The entire culture of the book was very bold and sensual. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 stormhawk | 1/18/2012

    " Yes, its dated. But it is still Bond. Growing up this was my second-favorite Bond novel, still is. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven Peterson | 8/16/2011

    " James Bond versus Mr. Big, a SMERSH agent. The Bond woman? Solitaire. The settings for this novel move from Harlem to the Caribbean. It is fine for Bond afficianados, but not particularly well written nor are the characters real living humans. Still, an enjoyable thriller. . . . "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthiar | 7/25/2011

    " Excellent follow up to Casion Royale. It had me on the edge of my seat. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Theresa Leone Davidson | 6/29/2011

    " Very suspenseful novel! My first by author Ian Fleming, and I'm looking forward to now renting and watching the DVD. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 KatieSuzanne | 6/3/2011

    " There were so many things wrong with this book I won't even try to list them, but it was somewhat entertaining and had a more exciting ending than Casino Royale. A little more of the James Bond character you might expect and a whole lot of awkward politically incorrectness. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 5/4/2011

    " Wasn't as exciting as the first, but had to give it a three for the barefoot aquarium shoot out. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ros | 4/2/2011

    " Such an excellent book! the story throbs with atmosphere and makes your heart beat faster and your breathing become ragged. The story crackles out of the pages and is so realistic that I delayed reading it before I went to sleep in case I dreamed of the sharks it contains... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 KatieSuzanne | 3/23/2011

    " There were so many things wrong with this book I won't even try to list them, but it was somewhat entertaining and had a more exciting ending than Casino Royale. A little more of the James Bond character you might expect and a whole lot of awkward politically incorrectness. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trey | 2/27/2011

    " Great to finally read a book by Ian, love the movies "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 2/23/2011

    " Today I learned Bond is a bit racist. More so than the 70s Rodger Moore version. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Neil | 1/24/2011

    " I just love the pace of these books! Couple that with the awesome page turning use of language, couldn't make me happier! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Richard | 1/24/2011

    " Interesting story, but I had to mark it down for the racist elements. I'm thinking that when the book came out in 1954 the racism of the book was not viewed as anything abhorent, which is a disturbing thought. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kelly | 1/18/2011

    " Kind of a disappointing ending. "

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About the Author
Author Ian Fleming

Ian Fleming was born in London in 1908. He was educated at Eton and worked as a journalist in Moscow and a banker and stockbroker in London before becoming personal assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence during the Second World War. He wrote his first Bond novel, Casino Royale, at Goldeneye, his home in Jamaica, in 1952. Since then James Bond has gone on to become a global phenomenon.

About the Narrator

Rory Kinnear, a renowned theater actor, won the Evening Standard Award for Best Actor for his performances as Angelo in Measure for Measure and the title role in Hamlet, and he gained an Olivier Award for his portrayal of Sir Fopling Flutter in The Man of Mode. His TV credits include Count Arthur Strong, Lucan, Women in Love, and Black Mirror, and he played Bill Tanner in the Bond films Quantum of Solace and Skyfall.