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Download Liberty Collection Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Liberty Collection, by Frederic Bastiat
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (9,144 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Frederic Bastiat Narrator: Christopher Crennen Publisher: Aspen Leaf Media, Inc. Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2011 ISBN:
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The Liberty Collection includes: The Law by Frederic Bastiat (1 hour 20 minutes). Bastiat (bawst ya) (1801-1850) was an economist, a member of the French assembly, and an influential libertarian speaker and writer. The Law, Bastiat's most famous work, argues that the purpose of the law is the protection of individual rights, and that when governments adopt policies favoring particular industries or groups, the law becomes an instrument of injustice and oppression.

Things Seen and Things Not Seen by Frederic Bastiat (1 hour 9 minutes). Bastiat considers the value of a broken window in promoting industry; the value of armies, public works, and government credit guarantees in increasing employment; the danger that better machinery poses to employment; the use of tariffs to protect industry and other economic fallacies.

Cyrus McCormick, Inventor of the Reaper by Christopher Crennen (34 minutes). McCormick (1809-1884) demonstrated a workable reaper in 1831 and spent the rest of his life expanding the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company. McCormick's reapers had profound effects on the alleviation of US and world hunger.

The Way to Wealth by Benjamin Franklin (23 minutes). Franklin (1706-1790) grew rich publishing Poor Richard's Almanack, under the pseudonym Richard Saunders, from 1732 to 1758. Besides calendar and weather information, Franklin's almanacs had many sayings, proverbs, and aphorisms. A selection of these sayings was added to the 1757 almanac as The Way to Wealth, a speech by an old man to buyers at an auction.

The Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson (9 minutes). Jefferson (1743-1826) was the principal author of the Declaration, which asserts that all men are endowed by their Creator with unalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and that the only proper purpose of government is to secure these rights. The United States Constitution and Bill of Rights by James... Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Louise H | 2/10/2014

    " Interesting ideas, not sure I fully agree though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alex | 1/31/2014

    " Everyone should read this at least once. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danielle Elizabeth | 1/21/2014

    " Read for TPHIL200 (Introduction to the Philosophy of Human Rights) at University of Washington - Tacoma. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Victorine Van alphen | 1/20/2014

    " vanwege het niet te onderschatten inzicht in de noodzakelijkheid van vrijheid van meningsuiting voor het bestaan van vrijheid van denken. Vanwege zijn scherpe bescheiden rationele maar toch zeer humane denken, en de nuance en exactheid waarmee hij dit kon beargumenteren en onderzoeken met een open geest in Engeland in een tijd dat het ondanks zijn grote geesten weinig denkruimte bood maar eerder veel censuur, en ongelijkheid. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Erik Moore | 1/18/2014

    " This excellent work by John Stewart Mill makes a vigorous defense of tangible individual liberty which is quite compelling. While in many senses he surveys the norms of British imperial life, he emphasizes that through the variation in individual preferences and the eventual adoption of new ones that society progresses and improves. One of the most compelling arguments is that of the absurdity of enforced belief (through social insistence and tangible enforcement) and the great harm it does to society. He says rightly that instead of suppressing individual opinion, we should work to understand what we think and what we should do given the freedom to do so. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Don Gubler | 1/16/2014

    " One of the books I read on my way to understanding freedom well enough to write my own book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ho Manh | 1/15/2014

    " The argument is simple but profound. I agree with him how freedom for speeches could liberate human and help human beings to flourish. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Milkjohnjohnson | 12/9/2013

    " a must for talk radio listeners "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Goldenberg | 11/20/2013

    " This is the original argument for civil liberties. Along with Machiavelli's "The Prince," it's one of my two favorite short non-fiction books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary Anne | 10/25/2013

    " Brilliant stuff on freedom of speech totally relevant in today's political climate, a great man, thinker & writer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Winstonfail | 7/9/2013

    " he drones on, but he hits the nail on the head so fucking well "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Katherine | 6/17/2013

    " I did not like this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Geoff | 5/22/2013

    " This must be the most succinct and well-reasoned defence of liberty ever! Any student of political philosophy must read this book. Each page is incredibly thought provoking which makes this short book one which the reader will constantly put down to reflect upon. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patiki | 2/19/2013

    " Read it in college. Surprisingly readable for philosophy. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brandon Peele | 2/6/2013

    " Decent exposition of liberty, as a grounds for political organization, however, I found most of these argument quite arbitrary. He made distinctions around the ideas of "public good", "freedom" and "sound-mindedness" which seemed as arbitrary as any other such distinction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mcakes | 11/18/2012

    " Guilty of circumlocution but absolutely wonderful. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bob Sheblotznik | 5/27/2012

    " Really good points and philosophy, it's just really really dense. It killed me. Worth reading though, you just can't attempt it while tired. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 5/21/2012

    " I hate you J.S. Mill "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sherif | 5/15/2012

    " Refreshing review of classic liberalism. JML makes a couple of mistakes, and the writing could be clearer/straightforward, but a recommended read nonetheless. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Huma Rashid | 5/9/2012

    " A very, very important work of political/social theory. I love my edition - it has commentary from Judge Posner, among others! :D (I don't know if it's the same one I picked on here. It's edited by Bromwich and Kateb.) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jonny | 1/18/2012

    " Thus far into my reading, Mill makes many very poignant points on the topic discussed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kevin | 10/7/2011

    " The original Libertarian rocks the mic. "

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