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Download La Montana Magica (The Magic Mountain) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample La Montana Magica (The Magic Mountain) Audiobook, by Thomas Mann
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (11,338 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Thomas Mann Narrator: Daniel Quintero Publisher: Yoyo USA Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2006 ISBN:
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Una descripcion morbosa de la decadencia. La Montana Magica fue la obra que logro para Thomas Mann, el insigne escritor aleman, el Premio Nobel. En esa historia, situada en un sanatorio de tuberculosos en los altos de una montana, el autor creo un increíble microcosmos, reflejo de lo que el consideraba la decadencia de su patria y de toda la civilizacion europea. El protagonista Hans Castorp, una persona promedio, sin ninguna aspiracion a ser heroe, representa al hombre del comun, aislado en un medio donde las cosas suceden pero sin que ninguno de los personajes pueda hacer nada para impedir o para avanzar los hechos. Considerada como una de las grandes novelas de la literatura universal, es una orgullosa adicion para esta serie de audiolibros.

In this dizzyingly rich novel of ideas, Mann uses a sanatorium in the Swiss Alps, a community devoted exclusively to sickness, as a microcosm for Europe, which in the years before 1914 was already exhibiting the first symptoms of its own terminal irrationality. The Magic Mountain is a monumental work of erudition and irony, sexual tension and intellectual ferment, a book that pulses with life in the midst of death.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Snipkin | 1/5/2014

    " One of the best books I've ever read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geoffrey | 12/23/2013

    " The Naphta/Settembrini duel? Pretty cool. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 9/28/2013

    " the weirdest great novel i've ever read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 John | 9/23/2013

    " Hardest book I ever read. Almost never put a book down till I'm finished, but I couldn't stand more that a page or two a day at most, so it took me a couple years to get through this. Ugh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 8/5/2013

    " It took me more than ten years to finally finish this book, and my completion of it was aided by this second english translation, by John E. Woods. Previously the book was available in only one english translation, by H.T. Lowe-Porter, who was Thomas Mann's "official" translator. Hers is the version I started reading back in the 80s, maybe 1985. But the big roadblock here is that when one reaches the important climactic chapter at the book's center, "Walpurgis-Night," the energy-charged conversation between Hans Castorp and an important character of the book's first half is, in this translation, entirely in French. Ten pages of conversation in French. For a non-French speaker, this was hugely frustrating. I searched all over in vain for an English translation of this section. Eventually I asked a French-speaking friend of mine to tackle a translation. He did, and his immersion in the book led him to read it himself. I did not get into the book again for years, but when I did. . .I could not find my friend's translation! No matter, said he, his French was so much better now than it had been, and so he tackled the job again. I finally tackled the book a third time, starting again from the beginning. When I got the the pivotal chapter in question I used my friend's translation. Somewhere in there, and it must have been 1996, I discovered this NEW english translation by John E. Woods, so I incorporated it in my reading of the book. While H.T. Lowe-Porter's translation of the book's voluminous amount of slang and vernacular speech strikes the modern American reader as off-putting and sometimes confusing, Woods handles the dialogue really well for this day and age. . .and he renders that critical breakthrough conversation in english!! But Lowe-Porter gets the subtleties of the book's long, often philosophical sentences much better. An ideal would be a combination of the two translators, and that, essentially is how I finished The Magic Mountain more than ten years after beginning it! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alex Fresta | 7/29/2013

    " The futility of intellectual debate. The shortness and fragility of human life "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniela | 7/24/2013

    " Beautifully written. The smooth narrative is full of details, which makes you merge with the book. When reading it, I dreamed about the characters and felt their presence during the day. A classic that I recommend to sensitive souls. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Zachariah | 7/15/2013

    " Put you in cognitive crisis good "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ray Kempinski | 3/7/2013

    " Re-reading an old favorite. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pete | 3/3/2013

    " Beautiful story, and writing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mckinley | 7/25/2012

    " Think I didn't have the right grounding to truly understand this. Liked other of Mann's novels but this one dragged on for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryan | 7/21/2012

    " I didn't finish it. Very long and slow. I will finish it someday. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharpe | 6/25/2012

    " A classic modern novel offers up a critique of the complacent European aristocracy during the time before World War I. Lots of wonderful characters, some are pathetic, but you can't help identifying with them on some level. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 David Williamson | 12/30/2011

    " I got to about 150 pages but saw no reason to continue reading "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corey | 11/30/2011

    " Mann showed a command of his language (presumably, based on the translation) that I hadn't seen in any other book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bob | 8/22/2011

    " Read when I was young and I remember enjoying it very much. I'm not certain how I would review it if I read it again. Perhaps I should or perhaps I should rate it a 4. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ben | 7/6/2011

    " A book for another person, another time. Not a book for me, not right now. MacArthur said it best: "I shall return," to Switzerland, and the unlovable everyman that is Hans. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 4/25/2011

    " the book ends and then keeps on going, like a dirt path after the sidewalk ceases. things become unnatural by the final chapters. a microcosm of an introspective life "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gooby | 4/14/2011

    " Love this book-- reread it every few years. I don't think you're supposed to read it for the comedy, but Hans Castorp is one of the funniest characters in modern lit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bruna | 4/7/2011

    " Some classics take forever to read and are even boring to death. But most of them make you feel in an unique way. And I guess that's why I like them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Elizabeth | 4/5/2011

    " It has taken me months to read this book. I have read what the grand meaning of the book is supposed to be , but I did't see it. This is from an author who won the Nobel prize for literature and that is the only reason I finished it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rusto | 3/27/2011

    " I read this translation, but it doesn't have this cover, thank goodness. Amazon doesn't have this for Kindle. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melanie | 3/24/2011

    " Can I borrow your phallic writing tool? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Magda | 3/1/2011

    " Trovo molto difficile fare un commento a questa imponente opera di Mann. Decisamente un romanzo impegnativo, bello, enciclopedico. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Broadsnark | 2/4/2011

    " I didn't actually care for the book while reading it. It was an interesting concept, but the representational characters felt flat to me. And there was so much boring cataloging of nature. But I must say that a few parts still stick with me, so it was thought provoking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ruby | 2/3/2011

    " My all-time favorite book. Hands. Down. "

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About the Author
Author Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Germany. He was only twenty-five when his first novel, Buddenbrooks, was published. In 1924 The Magic Mountain was published, and, five years later, Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Following the rise of the Nazis to power, he left Germany for good in 1933 to live in Switzerland and then in California, where he wrote Doctor Faustus. Thomas Mann died in 1955.