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Download Joseph Andrews Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Joseph Andrews Audiobook, by Henry Fielding
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,007 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Henry Fielding Narrator: Sean Barrett Publisher: Penguin Audiobooks Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2012 ISBN:
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Penguin Classics presents Henry Fielding's Joseph Andrews, adapted for listening and available as a digital audiobook as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by the actor Sean Barrett.

Kissing, Joseph, is but a prologue to a Play. Can I believe a young fellow of your Age and Complexion will be content with Kissing?

Henry Fielding's riotous tale of innocents in a corrupt world was one of the earliest English novels, blending bawdy slapstick, philosophical musing, and pointed social satire to create a work of moral complexity and generous, life-affirming humanity. Published in 1742, it tells the story of the chaste servant Joseph Andrews who, after being sacked for spurning the advances of the lascivious Lady Booby, takes to the road, accompanied by his beloved Fanny Goodwill and the absent-minded, much put-upon Parson Adams. There they encounter robbers, tricksters, seducers, mishaps, and strange twists of fortune in a series of adventures filled with exuberant comedy.

Part of a collection of vintage recordings taken from the Penguin Archives, the Penguin English Library series offers affordable, collectable, quality productions that are perfect for on-the-go listening.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Abby | 2/20/2014

    " Note: I have only read "Joseph Andrews" and not "Shamela". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica | 2/10/2014

    " I enjoyed this book. I'm sure I would have enjoyed it more if I wasn't all hopped up on cold meds when I read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Eric | 1/31/2014

    " It was hard for me to have feelings at all about Joseph Andrews. I didn't like Shamela much at all (it was funny for about a page or two). Generally non-impressive. I do, however, want to read more by this author, to see if this was just a poor choice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily | 1/27/2014

    " It was a bit drilling because of the language and the multiple references and footnotes... But it was interesting and funny enough, at least the stuff I caught. Surely with a better knowledge of the context and the English of the time I could have enjoyed it much better, though. I especially liked all the twingling drama between families, servants, and class-relations, and the most boring stuff to me were the small adventures along the way, at the inns and stuff. I hope my lecturer gives me a broarder view of the subject, hopefully. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Wicked Incognito Now | 1/22/2014

    " I skimmed this for an English class. There are some moments of brilliance (when the narrator expounds on character and class), but for the most part it's silly and tedious. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fern | 1/21/2014

    " shamela is a hilarious and insightful skewering of samuel richardson's pamela, which by the way is santimonous and very very boring "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 1/13/2014

    " Slightly better than Pamela due to the satire. Slightly worse than Pamela due to unnecessary slapstick. Won out as better mostly because it was shorter. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mandy | 1/13/2014

    " Read Samuel Richardson's "Pamela" first. This is the hilarious spoof of that famous work. It's a literary geek necessity. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nick Black | 1/9/2014

    " The single worst thing I had to read in high school English aside from Tess of the d'Urbervilles. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 12/23/2013

    " Love it -- bloody funny. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erica | 12/6/2013

    " Fielding mocks Richardson, does some other really smart things along the way. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ishmael | 12/5/2013

    " These *short* eighteenth century novels make me wonder why I've been wasting my life reading poetry. Ironic, bawdy, perhaps subversive, and wickedly funny. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lorraine | 11/29/2013

    " Amusing enough -- but the depiction of women is terrible!!! Also, those authorial interruptions -- pages of them! -- are annoying! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joseph Atkin | 11/18/2013

    " Very funny but crude satire. Not blatantly crude, but inconspicuously crude. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 pony | 9/10/2013

    " Samuel Richardson's Pamela is one of the worst books I've ever read - but was ultimately worth it, thanks to Shamela. Fielding's parody parallels Diderot's Bijoux Indiscrets in terms of humor that remains legible and enjoyable today, at a distance of several centuries. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hannah | 7/9/2013

    " Shamela is one of those anti-novel creations made to dissuade women from having "unrealistic" thoughts wedged into their minds. As if women were mindless creatures. But I have to say, it's smart, crisp, and funny. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Moudi | 5/25/2013

    " I admit that I didn't get it... I didn't understand a single thing ...don't wanna even try .... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia | 5/17/2013

    " A hilarious, cynical look at Richardon's Pamela and the hypocrisy of people in general. One of the best books I've read for a class; would read again. I recommend it to anyone who can handle some older literature and also likes a good laugh (or groan). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Catherine | 5/2/2013

    " call me crazy, but i really liked this book when i read it in grad school. andrews is hilarious! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bentley | 4/5/2013

    " Most enjoyable for its witty style and clever representations of human flaws with satire, it introduced me to an era somewhat effectively but did not fulfill me in a way to make me wish to read it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rachel | 3/7/2013

    " As much as I love Richardson, I have to say that _Pamela_ deserved these. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mel | 2/8/2013

    " My review of Henry Fielding's Shamela "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steve | 11/19/2012

    " Aside from being an enjoyable satire of his contemporary's works, Fielding has created a colourful bawdy novel with the outstanding comic creation of Parson Adams. Would have loved the novel to have centred more on him than the titular character. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine | 10/13/2012

    " I loved Shamela, but found Joseph Andrews to be too long-winded. Make sure you read Pamela first! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kate | 7/27/2012

    " tedious. fed up with Pamela and all that has to do with her. "

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About the Author
Author Henry Fielding

Henry Fielding (1707–1754) was an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich earthy humor and satirical prowess. His writings reflect his ongoing preoccupation with fraud, sham, and masks. Tom Jones is considered to be his greatest work.

About the Narrator

Sean Barrett has won over twenty Earphones Awards and two prestigious Audie Awards for his audiobook narrations. He started acting professionally at the age of twelve and has since appeared on television and in film in Minder, Brush Strokes, War and Peace, Sons and Lovers, and Return to Oz. His stage credits include performing in the West End with Noël Coward in his Suite in Three Keys. He has worked extensively on BBC Radio and has also narrated several television series, including People’s Century and Crash.