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Download How the Mind Works Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample How the Mind Works (Unabridged), by Steven Pinker
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (6,518 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steven Pinker Narrator: Mel Foster Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2011 ISBN:
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In this delightful, acclaimed best seller, one of the world's leading cognitive scientists tackles the workings of the human mind. What makes us rational - and why are we so often irrational? How do we see in three dimensions? What makes us happy, afraid, angry, disgusted, or sexually aroused? Why do we fall in love? And how do we grapple with the imponderables of morality, religion, and consciousness?

How the Mind Works synthesizes the most satisfying explanations of our mental life from cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and other fields to explain what the mind is, how it evolved, and how it allows us to see, think, feel, laugh, interact, enjoy the arts, and contemplate the mysteries of life. This new edition of Pinker's bold and buoyant classic is updated with a new foreword by the author.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Damien | 2/11/2014

    " could be rearranged a bit to make the more intuitive elements of cognitive function more towards the front and then delve into the structural and electrochemical aspects of neural networks. But the latter sections about social cognition and evolutionary psychology are fascinating "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Broodingferret | 2/6/2014

    " This book was very well done. While the subject material is complex, Pinker's writing style is quite clear and detailed. He also imbues his material with wit and humor, which saves it from becoming just another dry academic treatise on neurology. While it doesn't possess the detail of an actual academic course, How the Mind Works is a good source for a basic introduction into evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maura | 2/6/2014

    " Interesting book but all I did was dip in and out of various chapters. I was just trying to do too many other things at the time to give it the attention it deserved. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Noah | 2/1/2014

    " This book is difficult to digest, and you have to read with unusual focus (there's no filler here), but Pinker is able to write just accessibly enough that you can really appreciate what he's saying. If you're curious about this sort of thing, this book is a great place to start. I can also pretty much guarantee that you won't find a book with more instances of the word "cuckold." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Pandojc | 1/30/2014

    " Giving it a review even though I didn't finish it, but I did read > than half. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert | 1/30/2014

    " great book but tough read. He doesn't write in a way that is easy to understand. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rambles Corbeau | 1/22/2014

    " It certainly stimulated much thought in this reader. Much of that thought, of course, pondering why I disagreed with this or that point and pointing out all the blind spots and assumptions Pinker exploits in his thinking. The funny thing is, that as much as most of the book got me all fired up and annoyed, I would probably read it again... if only because it did stimulate so much thought. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott Ford | 1/20/2014

    " Very extensive look at how the brain organizes and processes information. Extensive, but explained in accessible concepts and language. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt Kain | 1/18/2014

    " From page 561 to the end, Amen. Enjoy the ride. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Markii | 1/14/2014

    " i'm such a fan of steven pinker's lectures found on youtube and google videos. i was amazed at how understandable this book was for a layperson of psychology. i was constantly interested, educated and entertained. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benjamin | 1/7/2014

    " Some basic notions of cognitive psychology in too much packaging. Read fast. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Salil | 1/2/2014

    " Very good neuroscience book to understand our mind "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bobby | 12/24/2013

    " I tried to read this thing...but it is mind numbingly boring and I could barely make it through the first couple of sections. It think really smart people might find it interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebekka Istrail | 11/28/2013

    " Long and complex, so somewhat difficult to get through, especially the 88 pages on the mechanics of the eye. But fascinating and very satisfying. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Braine | 11/20/2013

    " Fascinating in places but quite long, and was so glad when I got to the end. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chris Wright | 11/14/2013

    " Tedious and superficial. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jafar | 10/3/2013

    " Lots of great interesting information, but the book doesn't achieve what it promises you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cosuma | 9/29/2013

    " Our thoroughgoing perplexity about the enigmas of consciousness, self, will, and knowledge may come from a mismatch between the very nature of these problems and the computational apparatus that natural selection has fitted us with. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan Brush | 7/30/2013

    " Probably my all-time favorite non-fiction book. Provides plausible explanations for observed behavior based on the best evidence available. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amit | 3/14/2013

    " Fascinating. Non-fiction popular writing at its best. Informative. Engaging. Very well articulated for layman to be able to understand complex concepts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anna | 1/3/2013

    " Made me want to be a cognitive scientist. If only it'd been a major at a college besides MIT... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Glynn | 11/11/2012

    " This was an excellent book about the mind. It requires lots of concentration but is a really fun read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Yotamhod24 | 9/22/2012

    " excellent explanation to follow up the language instinct. pinker will no doubt expand your vocabulary. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren Titus | 6/17/2012

    " I love this book. It's seriously awesome. Pinker is a genius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jrobertus | 6/13/2012

    " 5 stars. i read this book twice now. it is so interesting and timely, tying together evolutionary biology and modern cognitive science. essential reading to anyone who wants to know who we are. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Glad | 12/13/2011

    " Intriguing if nothing else. Follows somewhat of a theme of how our beliefs come into being and also has many moments where it looks at aspects of life/world in an abstract manner. "

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About the Narrator

Mel Foster is a prolific audiobook narrator, having read dozens of titles throughout his career. He is the recipient of the prestigious Audie Award, as well as the AudioFile Earphones Award. A former advertising agency executive who used to record test tracks for commercials, his narration career was born out of encouragement from his clients who would often say, “why are we hiring someone else? I like this guy.”