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Download Homer: The Essential Iliad Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Homer: The Essential Iliad Audiobook, by Homer
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (125,156 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Homer Narrator: Stanley Lombardo and Susan Sarandon Publisher: Parmenides Publishing Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2007 ISBN:
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This audiobook contains the most exciting and essential parts of the Iliad, capturing the final 50 days of the Trojan war and bringing to life ancient men and heroic battles. It provides an integral beginning to the infamous journey of Odysseus.

Translated by Stanley Lombardo. Introduction by Susan Sarandon.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeff Miller | 2/13/2014

    " I haven't read this since I was a teenager and I was rather surprised by how violent it was. Battles were certainly quite descriptive. Still as someone who always enjoyed the Greek and Roman myths I really enjoyed reading it this time especially the capriciousness of the gods and how much of a jerk some of the heroes were. What I also found interesting is how it showed both sides of the war in a very even handed way showing the heroes on both sides. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathleen Krepps | 2/5/2014

    " Surprisingly readable and interesting! I read it for a book club, which is the way to do it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matthew Hurley | 2/2/2014

    " I want to read the original Greek... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stacy | 1/27/2014

    " First of all, a sincere thanks to my more scholarly friends who recommended the Fagles translation. The text is relentless, violent, tender, cinematic, and in many ways, pure. It is extremely readable. And I approached this epic as an innocent, outside the realm of high school or college teacher biases, reliant only on Knox's excellent introduction and very clear explanatory notes. I was in good hands from the opening lines to the last. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gwylim | 1/25/2014

    " Its just awe smelling the air of a time passed for 3000 Jears, something like a beginning in Human History to write Stories. Its great to reflect about that Achill is still remembered today, like foretold 3000 Jears ago from a man obscured by history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim Adkins | 1/15/2014

    " A literal classic, though I wasn't quite able to appreciate all of its niceties as a fourth-grader. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nathan Thompson | 1/14/2014

    " Couldn't even finish the book. After reading The Odyssey, I couldn't keep my attention on the pages and pages of nothing but names. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sutherland | 12/31/2013

    " Many-stanza-ed poem that remains relevant throughout the long-and-bloodied eons. Everyone should give it a shoot! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James McNulty | 12/30/2013

    " A great tale of war that expounds, in an exciting manner, on the final days of the trojan war and the triumph of the Achaean hero, Achilles. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Samantha | 12/15/2013

    " Maybe I'm just not one for ancient literature, but I was sorely disappointed in The Iliad. I found it to be vague and boring, with the exception of the suddenly greatly detailed and bloody battle scenes. Ah, well. I have no doubt that Homer's great work is a classic, but it just wasn't for me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brittany Petruzzi | 12/6/2013

    " Incredible. Fagles' translation is the next best thing to the original Greek. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cherrie | 12/6/2013

    " I love what Fagles does with this translation. I actually read this for a class and we compared certain books in the Lombardo and Fitzgerald translations. They are all three very different reads. I would highly recommend this translation if you've never read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ernest | 9/22/2013

    " Focus is heavy on the interference of the gods in the matters of men in the Trojan War. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Travis Lambert | 9/17/2012

    " The best epic poem. Period. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emilie | 8/30/2012

    " This is a brilliant translation that I really enjoyed reading! What more can I say, it's Homer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Dunne | 6/7/2012

    " another homeric epic, read when i was in my teens. also quite enjoyable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Demi | 4/11/2012

    " Absolutely stunning. A great read that anyone can enjoy, really recommend it :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carla | 1/1/2012

    " Proud to have finished, and even more proud to have enjoyed it! I had no idea I would like it as much as I did. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Grace Best-Page | 11/8/2011

    " I guess I'm just not into glorifying senseless war and bloody so-called heroics. So much suffering and death, and over what? It's hard for me to view it through the eyes of the times. I know the story is part of our mythos, so that's why I gave it two stars instead of one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Holly Lindquist | 10/15/2011

    " If over 600 pages of lyrically-rendered death, blood, and mayhem sound like your cup of tea, than you'll definitely want to read this. People get eviscerated, skewered, decapitated, hewed, trampled, hacked, cleaved, etc, and it's all really very poetic. I just wasn't crazy about it for some reason. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jane | 5/29/2011

    " Heavy duty, but it must be done. Widen your perspective; learn more about the world and how we got to where we are. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alex | 5/24/2011

    " Epic win ;) get it?? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rondell | 5/23/2011

    " i am a big fan of this book . man who goes through a hold lo of advanture just to make it home and when he get home he still got promblems.on his journey home he faces the cyclops the siren chydris and carbdis plus the suitors "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Taylor | 5/22/2011

    " The Lattimore translation is marvelously close to the original, yes, but let’s face it — it’s prose (prose with unjustified right margins). Fitzgerald is correct, even when he takes liberties. And more importantly, his translation is genuinely poetic. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stacey | 5/21/2011

    " Not exactly my cup of tea. Although I am part Greek myself, Greek mythology has never truly held my interest, maybe when I'm older I'll give it another shot, but for now I find the writing and poem great, but Odysseus and his men not quite that interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sheldon | 5/18/2011

    " I recommend the Lattimore translation. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anna | 5/16/2011

    " I read this in college, and didn't enjoy it much. Maybe I need to re-read? Or maybe it's really just not for me.... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lauren | 5/16/2011

    " I felt guilty for not liking this more, but I was a bit bored during it. Glad I read it, though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 5/14/2011

    " I have taught seven translations of The Odyssey and Fagles has been the most accessible to the students. I still cover the entire book with my freshmen, feeling that through this classic they can learn what great literature is like. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 kyry | 5/14/2011

    " Hard to read... Kinda boring "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chad | 5/13/2011

    " I don't need to review this because thousands already have. Good book though. I liked it. Nice and long. Good story. so old its almost part of history. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 William | 5/13/2011

    " As Greek and Roman mythology is a favorite of mine, this epic was very entertaining. A great read to understand the action stories of a culture long ago. "

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About the Author
Author Homer

Although recognized as one of the greatest ancient Greek poets, the life and figure of Homer remains shrouded in mystery. Credited with the authorship of the epic poems Iliad and Odyssey, Homer, if he existed, is believed to have lived during the ninth century BC, and has been identified variously as a Babylonian, an Ithacan, or an Ionian. Regardless of his citizenship, Homer’s poems and speeches played a key role in shaping Greek culture, and Homeric studies remains one of the oldest continuous areas of scholarship, reaching from antiquity through to modern times.