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Download Hero-Type Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Hero-Type (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Barry Lyga
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (834 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Barry Lyga Narrator: Jonathan Todd Rose Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN:
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Barry Lyga has received high praise from publications like Booklist, School Library Journal, and Publishers Weekly.

A frank novel combining realistic teenage dialogue and biting comedy, Hero-Type addresses many questions on the minds of contemporary teens. After rescuing a classmate, otherwise unremarkable Kevin Ross is hailed as a hero. But then he commits a shocking act that destroys his new popularity and threatens to reveal a dark secret. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ashley | 2/19/2014

    " I enjoyed this book--with reservations. It got extremely message-oriented and didactic and also crammed in A LOT of side issues and plots. Also, not sure if this book is as relevant as it was even before it got published... I did enjoy the fast pace, high-stakes that Lyga excels at. Not his best work, but if you are already a fan, you'll probably like it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 2/17/2014

    " Lyga is a very talented writer of teen books. Loved the teen character and the whole story in this book. Very realistic and believable outcome. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Theodore | 2/17/2014

    " My least favorite of Barry Lyga's books, it still manages to end strong. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 WCPL Teens | 2/11/2014

    " When Kevin rescues a classmate from a serial killer, he's suddenly thrust into the small-town spotlight and hailed as a hero. But he doesn't feel like one, especially because he has a secret about why he was on the spot to save Leah in the first place. When the mayor buys him a car and slaps on some patriotic magnets, Kevin's father, who fought in Kuwait, makes him take them off. Caught by the school newspaper, Kevin is forced to defend his action, and gets embroiled in a debate about patriotism and free speech. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 1/29/2014

    " A happenstance hero quickly becomes a pariah in his town when he is caught on film removing "support our troops" ribbons from the used car he is buying with reward money. Kevin, riddled with bad skin, a dysfunctional family, and low confidence saves longtime crush Leah from a serial killer. He neither welcomes nor understands the sudden limelight, but he does become angry and motivated to stand up for his right not to have a ribbon on his car, even though it was his ex-military father who asked him to remove it, and he starts to question many of the so-called patriotic platitudes of modern American life, such as the Pledge of Allegiance. He finds himself pitted against one of the most popular and best looking guys at school in the debate that ensues. While Kevin is an interesting character and his Council of Fools friends provide some element of humor, the book does get strident and preachy, not so much for me, but I imagine it coming across that way to many of the teen audience. I'm all for kids examining the underpinings of WHY we do what we do and questioning the validity of acts like putting a magnet on our cars and thinking that soldiers serving overseas actually reap some kind of benefit. Like another of my favorite somewhat political YA books The Gospel According to Larry, this one will be a tough sell simply because so few teens appear to gravitate towards books with social and political messages. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 E. Anderson | 1/18/2014

    " Kevin' doesn't think he's much of a hero. The whole town considers him one, though, since he saved a girl from his school from being kidnapped by "The Surgeon," a brutal serial killer and rapist. Sometimes the attention is nice, since his dad barely pays attention to him at home and it's not like he's the most popular guy or the handsomest guy in school - he's far from it. Kevin told everyone that he was just at the right place at the right time, which, in a way he was. But the truth is there is more to that night, and the secret reason that he was there to save the girl - Leah, the unwitting object of his affection - is less than honorable, perhaps even perverse. So when the town stops worshiping Kevin and starts treating him like the villain he really is, it wouldn't bother him so much, except that they still don't know his secret. They're up in arms over the "Support the Troops" magnets that he refuses to put on his car. And it's not even that Kevin doesn't support th troops - he just believes in free speech, and he doesn't think that putting magnets on your car does very much for the soldiers fighting overseas. So Kevin starts a debate, one he is sure to lose. Meanwhile his friends, the self-appointed "Council of Fools" are pulling some politically-inspired pranks all over town. But when the local paper starts publishing less than flattering stories about Kevin's dad, and the Council starts to lose perspective, Kevin sees that proving his point about free speech is more important than he could have imagined. And so is confronting the ugly truth about the night that he saved Leah. Lyga's presentation of some very relevant issues is engaging and fast-paced. The character of Kevin, despite all of his flaws (the darker of which come to light over the course of the novel) is sympathetic and his problems aren't unlike those of most teenagers - he isn't in with the in crowd, his self-image is terrible, and he has trouble at home. As Kevin narrates the story, while sometimes the reader is acknowledged in a way that nearly pulls him away from the fiction at hand, it is done with a skillful conversational tone that is easy to fall into. Hero-Type is an important book, one that should be considered for high school libraries across the country. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 bekah | 1/7/2014

    " Not much of a plot, really. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly O | 12/26/2013

    " This book is perfect for librarians. It is all about freedom of speech and one teenager's struggle with it. A perfect way to introduce the first amendment, but may not be well received with more consevative folks who may agree with the anatagonist. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 super captain man | 12/4/2013

    " I thought this book was going to be lame, but it was actually surprisingly cool. Great storyline, realistic, nice voice. A well-done book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dominican809 | 11/17/2013

    " This a hell of a book really good "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 April | 11/11/2013

    " Takes on free speech/flag burning/pledge of alleigance concept in an entertaining way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hanny G | 10/29/2013

    " Super awesome book! I thought it was totally cool that he was a Catholic (like me!) and that he finally went back to church and confessed all his sins. And his church has the same name as mine, Sacred Heart!! How cool is that?!? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caroline | 10/19/2013

    " Another realistic story about a "hero", who's just a slightly confused boy...about what it really means to be American or a patriot. and also whether stupid stuff teenage boys do when they're bored is really relevant social commentary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martha | 10/12/2013

    " Good points about freedom & free speech, as well as about boys & girls & obsession vs. love, but it had quite a bit of vulgarity in it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ani | 7/14/2013

    " Got this Arc... I loved how it took place in the same town as his others! I'm tempted to say "Hail, Fool." to my friends now... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janie Hepler | 5/25/2013

    " Absolutely amazing! The arguments in the books rally made me think. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tricia | 4/24/2013

    " Couldn't finish this book. Was hoping for something different than a teenage diatribe.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Raisse | 3/28/2013

    " I think this is a great older Middle School/High School level read. There is a great discussion of Freedom of Speech in the book. As usual, I do not find Lyga's characters appealing but this is my favorite of his books so far. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mariah smith | 3/25/2013

    " loved it! loved it! loved it! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Judy | 12/1/2012

    " Kevin starts out as a hero, and then stuggles with his views of himself, guilt,secrets, his parents, and what it means to be patriotic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Maria-Isabel | 5/11/2012

    " Very Good book. Very emotional "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ms. Graves | 4/6/2012

    " After reading the first chapter I wondered if I would like this book. But after reading it, it really hooks you. It has some great themes like First Amendment and free speech. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cecilia | 7/19/2011

    " This is a good YA novel about what it means to be a hero, to love your country, to practice free speech and to fight against the odds. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meghan Weismiller | 7/19/2011

    " SO GOOOOOOOD! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liz | 5/12/2011

    " I liked this book! It really turns the idea on hero ideal on it's head. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jared | 4/19/2011

    " More Lyga brilliance. I love the exploration of what it really means to support our troops. Does a yellow-ribbon bumper sticker really show support? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hanny | 4/12/2011

    " Super awesome book! I thought it was totally cool that he was a Catholic (like me!) and that he finally went back to church and confessed all his sins. And his church has the same name as mine, Sacred Heart!! How cool is that?!? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 3/17/2011

    " A perfect book about freedom of speech from a teenage point of view! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meep | 2/3/2011

    " I thought this book was going to be lame, but it was actually surprisingly cool. Great storyline, realistic, nice voice. A well-done book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dalton | 9/17/2010

    " this book is very good. its very in tens it so good that people that dont like to read would read this book.it has very good detail.it allso exsplains the book very well.this book is for kids who like adventur and that get in trouble alot. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerri | 8/18/2010

    " Interesting take on the Pledge of Allegiance and why we say it. Also liked the parts about Freedom of Speech. But I still abandoned it due to lack of interest in the characters. "

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About the Author
Author Barry LygaBarry Lyga is the author of several acclaimed young adult novels, including I Hunt Killers, its sequel Game, and his debut, The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl. He now knows way too much about how to dispose of a human body. Barry lives and writes in New York City. His website is barrylyga.com.