Extended Audio Sample

Download Henry IV, Part 2 Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Henry IV, Part 2 (Unabridged) Audiobook, by William Shakespeare
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,452 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: William Shakespeare Narrator: Sir Ian McKellen, Corin Redgrave, Derek Jacobi Publisher: Saland Publishing Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2011 ISBN:
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Sir Ian McKellen, Corin Redgrave, and Derek Jacobi perform Shakespeare's historic play about Prince Hal's journey toward kingship, and his ultimate rejection of Falstaff.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara | 1/31/2014

    " I will admit that I was not so in love with this play. It just isn't as good as part one, and though the final scene is definitely one of the most devastating not just in Shakespeare but in theater, it felt like a lot of the Hal/Falstaff relationship got ignored in the rest of the play to make room for drunk slapstick. And not that there's not a lot of good to be had in drunk slapstick, but with Hal not even showing up until Act 2 scene 2, it felt unfocused. After part 1, I think there was enough history for half a play, which meant that this play feels like it has a lot of filler. Also, since one of the play's major theme is aging and dying, it has a melancholy throughout that makes it not a fun read. Good, not my favorite. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 1/29/2014

    " See my review of Henry IV, part one. Same idea. Fabulous. Must read before reading Henry V. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole | 1/27/2014

    " I liked that this was a completely different aspect than pt. 1- instead of focusing on the heroics and battle, it focused on the politics and drama of the time period. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily Adams | 1/24/2014

    " Again, read up on the actual history before reading the play. I also found it helpful to read some of the explanations on Sparknotes as a companion to understand the character of Prince Hal (turned King Henry) and the complicated nature of his character. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 1/23/2014

    " I have to say, not my favorite Shakespeare play, but still really good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Benny | 1/22/2014

    " Henry IV pt. 2 picks up where the last play left off, and while great, it never quite measures up to the first installment. The (presumably) resolved dilemma of the first play returns, but there is less enthusiasm since the first play has already given us what we're looking for. Nevertheless, there are some great lines from Falstaff, and the scene where Hal shuns his old friend is touching. I don't want to deter the curious, but if you've read the first Henry IV, this play is supplemental rather than essential. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gabe Redel | 1/10/2014

    " A must read in the Henry series. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mike Jensen | 1/8/2014

    " An excellent edition of a great play. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dvdurante | 1/2/2014

    " Boring, but an awesome play. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Jellinek | 1/2/2014

    " In some ways even better than Part 1, if only for the devastating scene at the end where Henry V--now king--disowns Falstaff. It's a situation we all find ourselves confronting (although we may not come to the same conclusion or handle it the same way) as we enter adulthood. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brian Barbour | 11/16/2013

    " This is one of my favorites of Shakespeare's works for the simple fact that we get to see Hal come to the cross roads of his life. Henry V does a great job showing us what kind of man he becomes once he makes the decision to abandon his wild ways and accept his role in the Monarchy of England. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 kat | 4/5/2013

    " Sequels are never as good as the original, unless they're Empire Strikes Back, Aliens, or The Last Crusade. Those sequels were BETTER. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Al | 1/9/2013

    " The further adventures of Prince Hal, wherein he degrades himself by lying to his enemies to induce them to surrender, and to his dying father. Becoming King, he spurns his old drinking buddy Falstaff. Are we supposed to like this guy? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebecca | 1/5/2013

    " Better than Part 1! The scene between Prince Henry V and Falstaff at the end is very powerful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Caitlin Costello | 12/10/2012

    " The second half of Prince Hal and his relationship with his father the king and his friend Falstaff. Hal rejects Falstaff, defeats the hotheaded Hotspur, and is back in his father's good graces, but was it worth it? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel Swords | 11/19/2012

    " Part two of the future Henry V's rise. In this play, we see him become King Henry V, and he immediately begins his reign with a few changes that may surprise you! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nurul | 7/21/2012

    " Well, that was a bit disappointing; I liked this a lot less than its prequel. Henry IV, Part 2 had its moments but on the whole, it's a little bit underwhelming. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eyehavenofilter | 5/15/2012

    " The old man dies, a young man questions his fate. Tavern wenches tempt the weak and politics are the talk of the day . Sound familiar? Shakespeare is still relatable today, whodathunk it? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Theresa | 3/12/2012

    " the final of the thrilling battle "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shana Yates | 11/27/2011

    " Strange and somewhat random play. It doesn't really seem to move forward very well, though (as always) use of language is superb. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 David Loveland | 9/15/2011

    " Not to spoil the ending but poor Falstaff! The Henry IV plays would be nothing without that lovable rogue! He is the only reason I'm giving the play more than 1 star, as there is really very little otherwise which happens in this play... truth! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rick | 9/9/2011

    " More Falstaff so it has to be good "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sandra Strange | 9/5/2011

    " You really have to like history and understand Elizabethan English to enjoy S's historical plays. This one shows the young Hal turning into Henry V, rejecting his youthful wild ways and his early companions, including Falstaff. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jane | 7/10/2011

    " Did I miss something, or many things? The entire play seemed disjointed and skippy. I was quite fond of the first couple of scenes, but then it went downhill very quickly for me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katherine | 6/29/2011

    " Some good speeches. Not well written. Shakespeare phoning it in a lot. Rumor personified? Even Shakespeare made fun of that device in A Midsummer Night's Dream, as an example of bad playwriting. Characters pretty meh. Hal not that likable. Falstaff not that likable. King Henry not that likable. Eh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jaime | 5/13/2011

    " This is obviously a 5 and by far my favorite so far of the histories, but I fear I have much more learning and rereading to do before I can officially change its ranking and fully articulate why. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ben | 5/9/2011

    " My favorite Shakespeare play, it combines adventure, comedy, history, and tragedy together to form one of Shakespeare's broadest reaching plays. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel | 4/21/2011

    " Good story though I didn't like Sir John! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Guy | 3/8/2011

    " This play was so dull that we actually gave up reading it in my Sophomore year High School English class because even Mr. McConnell was bored of it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mike | 2/28/2011

    " The small size and muddy color do not help this revamped Classics Illustrated (now packaged and marketed as a study cheat) succeed. Another problem, some characters look too much alike to be esaily distinguishable. A misfire. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew | 12/24/2010

    " I'll be honest--I saw Henry IV at the Globe Theater fall 2010 season and their production blew me away. The relationship between Hal and Falstaff had to be one of the most convincing on stage friendships I've ever seen. Marvelous. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Molly | 12/20/2010

    " Falstaff... and his idea of death and honor is the most profound thing in the play. That's why the Queen loved his character so much. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rachel | 10/6/2010

    " Was ok, had to read it for a college class. Not a big Shakespeare fan but it was ok :-) "

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About the Author
Author William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564–1616), English poet and dramatist of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean period, is the most widely known author in all of English literature and often considered the greatest. He was an active member of a theater company for at least twenty years, during which time he wrote many great plays. Plays were not prized as literature at the time, and Shakespeare was not widely read until the middle of the eighteenth century, when a great upsurge of interest in his works began that continues today.