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Download Hadji Murad Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Hadji Murad Audiobook, by Leo Tolstoy
3.87 out of 53.87 out of 53.87 out of 53.87 out of 53.87 out of 5 3.87 (23 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Leo Tolstoy Narrator: Kirill Radtzig Publisher: IDDK Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2012 ISBN:
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Hadji Murad, Tolstoy's final novel, tells the story of a real-life Caucasian Avar general who served under Imam Shamil, the leader of the Muslim tribes of the Northern Caucuses and, for a time, Russia's greatest enemy. Hadji Murad plans to defect to the Russians and then lead a Russian-backed army to defeat Shamil.

Please note: This audiobook is in Russian.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 2/15/2014

    " Excellent short story. Was good to read on a kindle where a dictionary was there for all the geographical references. Typical writing for Leo showing Russian culture during the period. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mu'az | 2/14/2014

    " but i read the malay translation "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Susan Henn | 2/8/2014

    " 5/2012 Well written story about a famous Chechen Muslim warrior who goes over to the Russians due to a feud within the mountaineers. Based on true events, the sad tale is an illustration of the ongoing power struggles between and within warring groups in Asia and the Middle East arenas. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brownguy | 2/7/2014

    " Loved this book, still relevant. I kept this in my car in case I was stuck somewhere. This book holds a special spot in my heart. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian | 1/17/2014

    " Not Tolstoy's best short work, in my opinion, but it was certainly a unique portrayal of a man whose sole duty is to his own interests and freedom, and of the incapatibility of that with the world. Neither the Chechens nor the Russians are portrayed positively in this book, and one can certainly sense Tolstoy's pacific philosophy at work in the narration. It is also provides a unique insight into the lesser known way of life of the Chechens, among whom Tolstoy served while in the Russian army. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 1/16/2014

    " Tolstoy's best feature is his accessibility. He writes very simply and to the point. His observations on human psychology are mind-blowing. This book was more difficult to get into at first (his other novels hook you on the first page) because the organization is odd. But once you are into it, you really find yourself inside of his world. Amazing images that I can still see in my mind. This would make a great movie. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarallyn | 1/10/2014

    " Some beautiful pastoral descriptions and short enough to even entice me to read Mr. Tolstoy, but I was left depressed. They Chechens are still fighting the same battle today with the same tragic results. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gary | 12/28/2013

    " Great book. Some say Tolstoy's best story. Written late in his life. Has a strong moral storyline. Seems like the Russians and Chechnians have been at it a long time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzi | 12/7/2013

    " This was an interesting and personalized look into a struggle that goes on and on. I did not find it as emotionally engaging as say The Death Of Ivan Ilyich "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vânia Vincent | 11/30/2013

    " Epic book...just love it "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jen Cotton | 11/9/2013

    " Short, but painful. Interesting stuff from an historical perspective, but a bit of a slog. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 10/30/2013

    " I really like Russian classics. This was an interesting study of human nature. Makes me want to read more Tolstoy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gary Patella | 10/21/2013

    " Hadji Murat is a really good story. Tolstoy seems to send a message about understanding other cultures, and decides to write about a non-Russian protagonist. You sympathize with Hadji and have a vested interest in the character by the end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Veronica | 9/3/2013

    " This was my first look at Tolstoy and I was surprised to find myself immensely enjoying this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Marvin | 8/17/2013

    " Hard to follow...lost energy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marion | 8/9/2013

    " Hadji Murat is a Beautiful character... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Malcolm Brown | 8/7/2013

    " Not Tolstoy's best-known work by any means, but in my opinion it should be. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Karen | 8/3/2013

    " I thought this book was only ok. I think I had higher expectations based on other things I've read by Tolstoy. I did find it to be more sympathetic to the Chechens than the Russians, but something about felt incomplete to me--that there was a part of the story that was missing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 since1968 | 7/31/2013

    " Two brief books one wishes the right people had read at the right time: "Hadji Murad" and "The Quiet American." Both novels are nearly perfect. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 lita | 6/21/2013

    " dipinjemin vera :D "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sharon | 5/22/2013

    " Indispensable for understanding present-day Chechnya. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Khuzama | 2/14/2013

    " Wonderful book , i enjoyed it so much "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sean | 2/11/2013

    " If you have any doubt that history repeats itself, or that change comes slowly, read this tale of Muslim rebels in the neighborhood of today's Chechnya, struggling against the Russian empire of the 19th Century. Sound familiar? One of Tolstoy's last works, and a great one. "

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About the Author
Author Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born about two hundred miles from Moscow. His mother died when he was two, his father when he was nine. His parents were of noble birth, and Tolstoy remained acutely aware of his aristocratic roots, even when he later embraced doctrines of equality and the brotherhood of man. After serving in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories, he traveled and studied educational theories. In 1862 he married Sophia Behrs and for the next fifteen years lived a tranquil, productive life, finishing War and Peace in 1869 and Anna Karenina in 1877. In 1879 he underwent a spiritual crisis; he sought to propagate his beliefs on faith, morality, and nonviolence, writing mostly parables, tracts, and morality plays. Tolstoy died of pneumonia in 1910 at the age of eighty-two.