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Download Ghost Light Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Ghost Light (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Joseph O’Connor
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (561 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Joseph O’Connor Narrator: Marcella Riordan Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2010 ISBN:
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Dublin 1907, a city of whispered rumours. An actress still in her teens begins an affair with a damaged older man, the leading playwright at the theatre where she works.

Rebellious, irreverent, beautiful, flirtatious, Molly Allgood is a girl of the inner city tenements, dreaming of stardom in America. Witty and watchful, she has dozens of admirers. But in the backstage of her life, there is a secret.

Her lover, John Synge, is a troubled, reticent genius, the son of a once prosperous landowning family, a poet of fiery language and tempestuous passions. Yet his life is hampered by Edwardian conventions and by the austere and God-fearing mother with whom he lives.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chris | 2/18/2014

    " This book was okay, but I hope for more from O'Connor's other works. The idea itself and the historical detail is respectable but the plot was distracting and sub-par. The entire story is told in jumpy flashbacks from the point of view of a now alcoholic former renowned actress. The love affair between playwright Synge and her was believable and well told, if not factually accurate but the jumpyness of the flashbacks was too distracting and hard to follow and greatly detracted from the overall quality of the story. My favorite part of the story were the intermittent gems of Irish sayings and narrative sprinkled throughout. I feel that the book would have been much better with more of those homey little sayings of the working class Irish people. There was also a lot of opportunity for confrontation between the different classes but O'Connor seemed to mostly skim over there. Overall, it was an acceptable read but nothing extraordinary. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/6/2014

    " Exceptionally written, beautifully descriptive. Dragged on a bit at the end, but on the whole a pleasurable read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Clodagh | 1/31/2014

    " An interesting perspective but I gave up before finishing the book. Didn't live up to the hype. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dewayne Stark | 1/28/2014

    " the story starts in 1952. When Molly starts talking about the wonders of the BBC broadcasting around the world she used "megahertz" in her description. The useage would have been cps as hertz wasn't used till the sixties. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura Lee | 1/26/2014

    " I found the book fascinating, mixing different styles of writing, even one chapter written as a scene in a play. The love story is loosely based on the real lives of Irish playwriter John M. Synge and Irish actress "Molly" Marie ONeill. I hadn't known either one, until I did some research after reading the novel. Dying at the young age of 37, Synge had already accomplished so much. O'Neill went on to marry twice and continued acting, even starring in some films. Their time together was brief but in the book, poor Molly is haunted by the first great love of her life. Her character is loveable and I had much sympathy for her and her downfall. It was an excellent read. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in the theater in the early 1900s, historical fiction lovers, and for anyone who enjoys a good story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ann | 1/25/2014

    " magnificent masterpiece as usual by Joe O'Connor. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jillian | 1/24/2014

    " Funny, sad and romantic...very Irish. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nancy | 1/18/2014

    " I loved Star of the Sea. The premise of this book sounded fascinating, but it was too slow, too Irish, and not very interesting. I'm still looking forward to Redemption Falls. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wayne Roylance | 1/16/2014

    " o'connor deftly balances poetic language and concise description in his tale about sara allgood's relationship with john synge. a beautifully written book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 12/31/2013

    " Atmospheric and emotional. It is mostly written in 2nd person, but not consistently, and sometimes I had a hard time figuring out whose voice I was reading. The poetic stream of consciousness sometimes made it hard to figure out what was going on. I didn't get the beginning or the end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lucy | 12/29/2013

    " A perfect gem of a little book. A fictional account of the love bx John Synge and Maire O'Neil (Molly Algood). Exquisite writing where similes and metaphors abound. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gill | 12/20/2013

    " A sad, atmospheric tale of an old actress recalling better times. I'm sure this book would reward a second reading or further study but I found it quite a difficult read and quite hard to piece Molly's life together. Will definitely read more by this author though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Do_chara | 12/18/2013

    " Some beautiful writing but O'Connor attempts to be a little 'arty' in this one in comparison with his other books. Nice story buy it doesn't move along well enough. Still worth a read (but Star of the Sea remain the jewel!) "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ericafoferica | 12/8/2013

    " I couldn't even finish the book it was that bad. That's a first for me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Erin | 3/26/2013

    " Very disappointing - apparently you "get" this book only if you know Irish playwright John Synge...which I don't "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rachel | 8/6/2012

    " Would have liked to like it, but struggled to keep at it ... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yasmien | 7/7/2012

    " Actually 3,5. Beautifully written, even though sometimes I felt his words were too beautiful, if that makes sense at all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 8/17/2011

    " Disappointed. Couldn't warm to JM, Molly or their love story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joie | 6/10/2011

    " Touching and brilliantly written. I am a huge Joseph O'Connor fan. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelly | 5/18/2011

    " I read this as part of the post-family-Ireland trip -- it was part of One Book, One Dublin. I very much enjoyed it, as it has its own rhythm and sheds an emotional light on early 20th-century Ireland that enriched the histories I'd been reading. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 5/5/2011

    " One of the things I really liked about this book is that the story revolves around a woman who appears to be a poor homeless bag lady but had actually led a very interesting earlier life. Makes me wonder about all those homeless people I see on the streets... what is their story? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Wayne | 4/11/2011

    " o'connor deftly balances poetic language and concise description in his tale about sara allgood's relationship with john synge. a beautifully written book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 3/29/2011

    " Atmospheric and emotional. It is mostly written in 2nd person, but not consistently, and sometimes I had a hard time figuring out whose voice I was reading. The poetic stream of consciousness sometimes made it hard to figure out what was going on. I didn't get the beginning or the end. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Celeste | 3/17/2011

    " I think this book probably deserves more than one star but I found it really tiresome after reading too many similar books. Cliches and stereotypes are based on fact, but they are still boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marguerite | 3/17/2011

    " Beautifully written, evocative, and enthralling. It doesn't matter that, as he he says himself, some of it is historically innacurate, it was a fascinating story, cleverly unfolded, and ultimately very moving. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denise | 2/19/2011

    " Beautifully written rumination of an aging alcoholic actress remembering her great love in early 20th century Dublin. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Erin | 2/19/2011

    " Very disappointing - apparently you "get" this book only if you know Irish playwright John Synge...which I don't "

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About the Author
Author Joseph O’Connor

Joseph O’Connor is a master trainer of Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) and the author of sixteen books, including the international bestseller Introducing NLP. He is originally from London, UK and moved to Brazil at the beginning of 2001. He founded Lambent do Brasil, a company specialising in business coaching, training, and consultancy in Sao Paulo. He is also the cofounder and President of the International Coaching Community (ICC), a worldwide network of trained coaches. Clients that he has trained and coached include: BT, UNIDO, BA, HP Invent, and Interbrew. ICC has NLP trainers all over the world. O’Connor’s books have been published in twenty languages.

About the Narrator

Marcella Riordan began her career at the Abbey School in Dublin and has worked in theaters throughout Ireland and the UK, including Druid Theatre and Lyric in Belfast. She has worked extensively on BBC Radio and RTE in Dublin. She was awarded Best Actress for her portrayal of Nancy Gulliver in a BBC Radio adaptation of Jennifer Johnston’s The Old Jest.