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Download Freakonomics: Revised Edition Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Freakonomics: Revised Edition (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Steven D. Levitt
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (268,950 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steven D. Levitt Narrator: Stephen J. Dubner Publisher: HarperAudio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2007 ISBN:
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Which is more dangerous: a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? How did the legalization of abortionaffect the rate of violent crime?

These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much-heralded scholar who studies the riddles of everyday life, from cheating and crime to sports and child-rearing, and whose conclusions turn the conventional wisdom on its head. Thus the new field of study contained in this audiobook: Freakonomics.

Levitt and co-author Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives: how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing. In Freakonomics, they explore the hidden side of...well, everything. The inner working of a crack gang....The truth about real-estate agents....The secrets of the Klu Klux Klan.

What unites all these stories is a belief that the modern world is even more intriguing than we think. All it takes is a new way of looking, and Freakonomics will redefine the way we view the modern world. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cheryl | 2/17/2014

    " Interesting book. Debunks a lot of myths and turns a lot of "accepted" facts on their heads. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danny | 2/10/2014

    " I wanted to give this a 2 star rating based on my own disappointment with it. But overall it was interesting, just not really freaky. I suppose the idea that the most commonly found answer isn't always the right one may be a foreign concept to many people, but that just doesn't throw me for a loop. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark Lasam | 2/10/2014

    " There are people who just settle to understand economics and there are those who go crazy with it. Freakonomics challenges you to think and dare ask unconventional questions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zaki Ibrahim | 1/27/2014

    " A pretty enjoyable read on how Economics explain the world we live in, although the examples/questions are focused on separate topics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ghengis Khan | 1/5/2014

    " not so interesting as I thought it would be. I'm not sure their workings out are entirely sound either. The section on names was a little tedious "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy Beth | 12/31/2013

    " I really enjoyed the concept of the book as well as some of the very interesting information, but was slightly disappointed that it didn't have more variety of topics. It went on and on about the baby naming stats. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kev Hickey | 12/27/2013

    " A good book, but not as great as it thinks it is. other books such as 'the undercover economist' and 'the tiger that isn't ' cover similar topics without coming across as being so arrogant. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rennie | 12/2/2013

    " Very Excellent! I really enjoyed the chapter about the crack dealer gang in the 80's... A dead-head Harvard student spent a few years studying a gang in Chicago.. and its not what you would expect.. Very cool views and super interesting.. Highly recommend. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan Martin | 11/2/2013

    " This is a really cool book. I've even used some of the stories in each chapter to discuss logic and data analysis in my courses. This book shows us that data analysis can result in multiple perspectives, and things aren't always as they seem. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lance | 10/10/2013

    " Thought-provoking and insightful. Most useful not for specific stories but in challenging ourselves to think critically about everything we think we know about the world. Oh, and the basic principle of the books is "people respond to incentives." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marguerite Hedrick | 9/13/2013

    " Fascinating. Just watched the movie. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eric Sheedy | 7/8/2013

    " Interesting read, like the idea of applying economic theory to social issues, however just like in business it all depends on ideology of the economist as to what their conclusions will be. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shuvom Ghose | 4/3/2013

    " If this is an indication what rouge economists can do, we should keep them away from everything! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leonil Carreon | 3/30/2013

    " Funny, eye-opener and interesting read about the trend in some commodities that emerged and their unprecedented success in terms of sales, e.g. Hush Puppies loafers. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ephreinhard | 10/10/2012

    " When you read this you either feel like you already knew all this but just didn't have the numbers or you go WOW. In my case I didn't go wow, but it was a good read nevertheless. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chung | 9/13/2012

    " Interesting read. Don't take the author as posing as an expert. Simply presenting statistics that go against conventional thoughts in compelling ways. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Teagan D | 7/31/2012

    " Very enjoyable. Not necessarily life-changing, but definitely motivation to question conventional wisdom and take a fresh look at why things are the way they are. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jacinto | 6/27/2012

    " Easily one of the best books I have read in a long while. Full of interesting, insightful and often surprising explanations for a wide range of social phenomena. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nitra Kosanwit | 4/9/2012

    " I have to admit that the book title made me skeptic. I read it nonetheless, and I loved it!! The world started to make sense, and I even sign up for Freakonomics Radio Station. This is a very entertaining piece yet informative. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kris Schimmel | 12/5/2011

    " Is interesting, but it doesn't provide data to back up their claims. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christopher Zhou | 11/15/2011

    " Interesting take on data and economy... but slightly outrageous sometimes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Arthur Reilly | 8/16/2011

    " You will learn a lot from this book that no schoo book will ever teach you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pam | 5/23/2011

    " Starting to get tired of this genre. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebecca | 5/21/2011

    " Freakonomics was better - more interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carly | 5/19/2011

    " Had some interesting points. Clever writing style, but often went on unnecessary tangents. Makes for some good conversation starters. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mel | 5/14/2011

    " I like this book. It's like reading a really long magazine article. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Frédérick | 5/13/2011

    " I had the special illustrated edition, considering the book is broken down in short lighthearted anecdotes, I was surprised by how long it took me to finish the book. By the end though, I realized it was the textbook-y nature of the edition which made it difficult for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deanna | 5/10/2011

    " I love these books. I enjoy the style they're written in and learning fascinating things about so many different topics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ellie | 5/8/2011

    " Random, but always interesting. Also, has some stuff about behavioral economics which I really enjoy, so that made it even better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fratisek | 5/7/2011

    " Dobrá a ctivá kniha. Ukazuje, proc se nechováme ekonomicky tak, jak se to ucí ve škole. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maria | 5/6/2011

    " Now I know why suicide bombers really should buy life insurance! And just as I suspected - many of the "solutions" to help stop global warming can actually do more harm than good. This book makes you think and question the ideas of our time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica | 5/5/2011

    " Fun read, especially to people interested in economics. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alison | 5/4/2011

    " Some general idea as Freakonomics, with a bit more ego-stroking and a few more loose ends. "

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About the Author
Author Steven D. Levitt

Steven D. Levitt is the Alvin H. Baum Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he is also director of the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. In 2004 he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, which recognizes the most influential economist in America under the age of forty. More recently he was named one of Time magazine’s “100 People Who Shape Our World.” He received his BA from Harvard in 1989, his PhD from MIT in 1994, and has taught at the University of Chicago since 1997. He coauthored the bestselling book Freakonomics with Stephen J. Dubner.

About the Narrator

Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and television personality. He is best known for his books Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, which have sold more than five million copies in thirty-five languages. The Freakonomics enterprise also includes an award-winning blog, a high-profile documentary film, and a public radio project called Freakonomics Radio, which Dubner hosts. He lives in New York with his family.