Extended Audio Sample

Download El Punto Clave (The Tipping Point) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample El Punto Clave (The Tipping Point) Audiobook, by Malcolm Gladwell
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (220,911 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Malcolm Gladwell Narrator: Rafael Monsalve Publisher: FonoLibro Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2008 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

FonoLibro se enorgullece en presentar el audiolibro del best-seller del New York Times El Punto Clave escrito por Malcolm Gladwell.

Por que en los años 90 disminuyo el crimen en Nueva York de manera drástica? Como un autor desconocido termina en la lista de los libros más vendidos? Qué hace un programa de Televisión como Plaza Sésamo ser tan exitoso en enseñar a niños a leer?

Este excelente audio libro escrito por Malcolm Gladwell explica porque grandes cambios en nuestra sociedad pasan repentinamente y sin previo aviso. Ideas, comportamientos y mensajes, Gladwell explica, se diseminan como una epidemia infecciosa. Como una persona enferma en una tienda es suficiente para comenzar una epidemia de gripe; el empuje ó comentarios de un selecto grupo de individuos pueden hacer un producto irresistible o comenzar una moda. Estas son epidemias sociales y en el momento que despegan y alcanzan la masa crítica es El Punto Clave.

Gladwell nos presenta las personalidades de diseminadores naturales de nuevas ideas y tendencias. Él analiza las tendencias de moda, los programas de televisión infantiles, entre otros para buscar como se empiezan y se mantienen latentes las epidemias sociales. Download and start listening now!

BK_FONO_000053

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nermien Reda | 1/24/2014

    " simply an eye opener, loved it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danielle Krause | 1/19/2014

    " An interesting read with innovative ideas/theories and some fascinating case studies. However, I was really turned off by how certain Gladwell seemed - he acted like his ideas had solved all problems of society and were absolutely correct. I just wasn't convinced by some of his ideas, particularly the final chapter on smoking. Of course the book would not have been as readable if he had included more scientific data and evidence, but it certainly may have convinced me more. Also, I had a hard time getting into the book at the beginning; it was a little slow and repetitive. Gladwell tried a little too hard to tie everything together and it led to some very circular writing. An alright read with some very interesting and novel ideas and facts, but should probably be taken with a grain of salt. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barbara Hilzinger | 1/14/2014

    " Love the point this book is making, but it could have been explained in a 10-page essay instead of rehashing the same thing over and over. And over. The stories were interesting and give a nice thought to chew on over dinner, but by dessert you're thinking, "Get on with it already. What else are you trying to say? Oh, the same thing again? Not exactly reheated leftovers, but clearly another attempt to creatively bake one more dish with the same damn ingredients." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tharindu | 1/5/2014

    " Really good for those who are keen on understanding how social epidemics work. The "Law of the Few" is simply amazing; a law that could really make a difference if applied righteously. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel Milstein | 1/4/2014

    " Such an interesting book. This book will make you change the way you think and the way you look at the world. It's a study in social behavior. Informative and not at all boring. I think it's not suitable for everyone and it requires certain taste but it's a nice book to read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Margaret Rosen | 12/5/2013

    " Who knew non-fiction could be so interesting? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zalihe Cetin | 11/29/2013

    " What makes an idea viral? How is that some ideas would not survive where others would become widespread and make it to the fad? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Esmeralda Ang | 11/26/2013

    " I like his Blink better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristen Johnson | 10/29/2013

    " Very interesting read although I thought Blink was a little better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gosia | 10/13/2013

    " Excellent. I learned so much about social forces of driving human behavior! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 ElroyStrongjaws | 10/1/2013

    " I felt like this could have been a New Yorker article. After I read a 100 pages, I was like, I got it! Enough! Why does everyone love this guy so much? I think I'll have to quote my husband and agree that he's "a hack intellectual." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sophia | 7/9/2013

    " Very interesting. Need to revisit this one again "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caron | 4/17/2013

    " Loved, loved, loved this book! He seems so logical and spot on with his conclusions... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thad Zajdowicz | 8/4/2012

    " A fascinating way to look at why things occur as they do -- not all is linear in life! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ilan Tsekhman | 3/26/2012

    " Fascinating. I couldn't put this book down! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nikita | 3/16/2012

    " I love all of Malcolm's works but this one is especially good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 S Milford | 10/3/2011

    " Gladwell is always fascinating and insightful. A good explanation of how things go viral. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alice Burba | 8/20/2011

    " Love the principles in this book. Learned so much! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brian | 7/23/2011

    " Excellent read. I enjoyed how he connected the major themes through real life examples. It makes the learning more relevant. It makes his message "sticky." I particularly enjoy being able to apply his messages to my school and my classroom. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Liz | 5/21/2011

    " Needs less hyperbole, more science. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich | 5/19/2011

    " A very interesting book.

    He does continue to propagate the Kitty Genonese story incorrectly, but otherwise a very fascinating book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Allegra | 5/18/2011

    " Fantastic book. Although it's non-fiction it more or less reads like a thriller. I can't wait to read Outliers, which I just got from the library, in addition to Blink and What the Dog Said. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Denise | 5/18/2011

    " I found this very interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 5/17/2011

    " Interesting ideas, but I think Gladwell assumes to much and presents too little supporting evidence for this book to be truly great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 5/16/2011

    " An amazing book on finding that small number of people who truly have the ability to make a difference "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sally | 5/16/2011

    " My three friends who read this book rated it 5 stars, 3 stars, 1 star. I'm in the middle. Best thing I learned was that we can only remember up to 7 things at once. Takeaway: Get those projects down to a manageable number! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tamara | 5/16/2011

    " Really interesting, a very unique look at thought epidemics, and the factors that contribute forming them. Really applicable to so many different arenas of society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jude | 5/15/2011

    " But, but: Who specifically started the Hush Puppies rebirth? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melody | 5/11/2011

    " System dynamics for dummies. Interesting anectodtes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Philip | 5/11/2011

    " Human nature exposed as you've never seen before! That's the type of screaming headline this book deserves. The Tipping Point explores social epidemics and reveals the minor but compelling changes required to start an epidemic. Fascinating, great reading, and extremely well crafted. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ben | 5/9/2011

    " This book opened my eyes to new ways the world works. Gladwell is controversial in some circles, but I find his theories fascinating, insightful, and entertaining. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Max | 5/9/2011

    " Interesting and very fast read. My favorite part was his discussion of connectors and how they are vital to a society. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer with the New Yorker since 1996. He is a former writer at the Washington Post and served as the newspaper’s New York City bureau chief. He has won a National Magazine Award, and in 2005 he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. He is the author of four books: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference, Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking, and Outliers: The Story of Success, all of which were #1 New York Times bestsellers. His book What the Dog Saw is a compilation of stories published in the New Yorker. Gladwell graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in history. He was born in England, grew up in rural Ontario, and now lives in New York City.