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Download Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet (Unabridged), by Bill McKibben
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,401 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Bill McKibben Narrator: Oliver Wyma Publisher: Macmillan Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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Twenty years ago, with The End of Nature, Bill McKibben offered one of the earliest warnings about global warming. Those warnings went mostly unheeded; now, he insists, we need to acknowledge that we've waited too long and that massive change is not only unavoidable but already under way. Our old familiar globe is suddenly melting, drying, acidifying, flooding, and burning in ways that no human has ever seen. We've created, in very short order, a new planet, still recognizable but fundamentally different. We may as well call it Eaarth.

That new planet is filled with new binds and traps. A changing world costs large sums to defend - think of the money that went to repair New Orleans, or the trillions it will take to transform our energy systems. But the endless economic growth that could underwrite such largesse depends on the stable planet we've managed to damage and degrade. We can't rely on old habits any longer. Our hope depends, McKibben argues, on scaling back - on building the kind of societies and economies that can hunker down, concentrate on essentials, and create the type of community (in the neighborhood, but also on the Internet) that will allow us to weather trouble on an unprecedented scale. Change - fundamental change - is our best hope on a planet suddenly and violently out of balance.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Joseph | 2/15/2014

    " This is two books in one: The first two sections formulate a rigorous, evidence-based argument, enlivened with skillful rhetoric and well-chose anecdotes, that we have already passed some critical tipping points in anthropogenic climate change that have fundamentally transformed the earth from that in which human civilization took shape. The last two sections, however, pose McKibben's pet solutions of smallness and simplicity in predictable terms. Not only do these sections not follow logically from the first two: They are fundamentally contradictory to it. Global problems stemming from complex natural processes require global social systems that not only are complex but that can handle complexity. Creating such a system requires thinking beyond the confines of either the nation-state or monetary economics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Jody Shepson | 2/14/2014

    " I wish everyone would read this one. He's a good writer, it's an important book. I loved the chapter that's mostly about Vermont, way cool! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Denise Walderich | 2/10/2014

    " A real wake-up call to environmental reality and how to survive what is truly a new and sometimes terrifying world. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Francesca | 1/31/2014

    " Although this book makes me want to move to Vermont (I hate cold weather, so this was quite the surprise!),raise bees and open a grist mill, I still found myself motivated to make changes to walk a little more lightly on our new eaarth. You probably need to already be a bit of a conscious/guilty consumer to embrace the message, but is a very worthwhile read for those needing more motivation to effect personal changes in energy/consumer habits. "

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