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Download DNA: The Secret of Life Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample DNA: The Secret of Life Audiobook, by James Watson Click for printable size audiobook cover
4.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 54.03 out of 5 4.03 (33 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: James Watson Narrator: Dan Cashman Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2002 ISBN: 9780736698160
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In 1962, James Watson shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins for the discovery of the structure of DNA, the fundamental molecular building block of life, which explains how hereditary information is replicated. Now, this renowned scientist returns to give this authoritative yet personal account of the course of modern genetic research and the technological and ethical challenges unleashed by it. In a rich story that appeals to the general reader, Watson explains how cellular processes act in the drama of molecular biology and explores the genetic choices that we now face. What are genetically modified foods, and do they really pose a threat to consumers or the environment? What options are available to a woman planning to have a child?
 
“Reading Watson is a delight, an opportunity to breathe the rarefied air of his generation’s greatest scientists.”—Publishers Weekly Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave | 2/18/2014

    " This book was a good crash course in genomics. James Watson has the ability to write in layman's terms well even though he is credited with the partial discovery of the DNA double helix. I liked the way he was able to write about many aspects of emerging DNA science with great knowledge of the peoples, actions and events such that it reads with more depth than a mere encyclopedia, even though at times, the author sounds a bit as if he feels that he can do no wrong...a possible by-product of a lack of humbleness. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 2/13/2014

    " i read this a while ago, maybe back in high school? i'm not really into overly scientific books and whatnot, but this one was really interesting. watson makes it a fun, enjoyable read even if you aren't into academic types of books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hamood Alsudais | 2/10/2014

    " It is a great book because the author tried to make things understandable and interesting. History, stories, scientific explanation, the opponents and the proponents views all together came up with this wonderful book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie Mcsweeney | 2/8/2014

    " Read this as a genetics undergrad and it was one of those books that confirmed my love of the subject, along with The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry. A fascinating area! But poor Rosalind Franklin where is her Nobel Prize??? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 C | 1/31/2014

    " Very interesting, would recommend for anyone with even a casual interest in genetics or biology. For those who already have knowledge of biology, it might seem a little dumbed-down at first, but once you get past Mendel's pea plants and white-eyed fruit flies that are covered in every Bio 101 class, things start getting pretty interesting again. And it kind of drags in the middle when we get into all the academia and business politic, but it picks up again with the science soon enough. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 1/17/2014

    " Great book. Part autobiography, part science. Explains why DNA is part of our understanding of evolution. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea | 1/8/2014

    " A very readable yet in-depth text. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrea | 12/24/2013

    " Since I'm in love with DNA, I was thrilled to read a book by the scientist credited with discovering it and it's unique properties. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ryan | 12/5/2013

    " James has captured the nature of why he chose genetics as his core work. He accounts the details as well as providing some context as the key investigators toward the world of biotechnology as we know it now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nick | 10/29/2013

    " Read a few chapters. Informative, if a little didactic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christina | 10/27/2013

    " It was fun to read, and it was a good review for me since I hadn't had many hard science classes for a few years when I read it. The end becomes kind of preachy, but the rest of it totally revived my love for genetics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 10/12/2013

    " this book will change our mind sets.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steph Seay | 7/25/2013

    " a good book tot basic info but a lot of info in the book seemed untrue i would take what this book says with a grain of salt "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stacey | 7/14/2013

    " Fascinating review of the dramatic impact of DNA research on society commemorating the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the double helix written by Dr. Watson himself and a collaborator. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe Paulk | 7/15/2012

    " Not only is this superbly written, but it is fairly exhaustive. The look at the politics behind scientific ventures is intriguing and Watson spares no punches towards Crick, although he does it rather tactfully. The questions raised in the end are also thought provoking and extremely pertinent. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nathan Williams | 6/29/2012

    " Remarkable book. Filled with all kinds of information. After reading this book, you get a fuller insight of how magnificent DNA is and the importance of it. It also gives an understanding of how scientists and clinical researches test DNA for medical advancements. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Iva | 5/12/2012

    " The best book about DNA and it's history and also future. Watson really shows how smart he is and how many things he knows. In this book you will find anything about DNA and also thing which are connected to it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terah | 1/21/2012

    " This is a very instructive book and was clearly written for such a complex subject. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Benjamin | 6/15/2011

    " James Watson shares some anecdotes and teaches history of DNA discoveries "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve Schardein | 6/8/2011

    " Great book by one of the original scientists behind the major breakthroughs. Biology is one of the most fascinating subjects to me, and to hear it spelled out in terms of basic chemical relationships (which this book does) is extraordinarily interesting in my opinion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew | 5/23/2011

    " an odd book with multiple perspectives telling the store of how DNA was discovered. It is actually quite interesting of a read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 4/10/2011

    " A great book about Scientific discovery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brittany | 4/8/2011

    " Considering the scientific nature, it was exciting to read about the discoveries of Watson and Crick "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew | 2/23/2011

    " Revealing, personal and approachable. Despite the tell-all tone, I found it somewhat hard to get a fix on the author himself; he seemed to downplay his own role, intelligence and personality. Nevertheless, it was a good read (heh). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 2/15/2011

    " Good, I got really excited at parts that convince me I'm a geek. Well written, for scientists and the layman. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gus | 2/13/2011

    " A very short, very entertaining read about the discovery of the structure of DNA, written from the subjective point of view of one of the main characters (and Nobel winners). I'm glad I read this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christopher | 2/7/2011

    " An intriguing account of science races and academic politics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 1/27/2011

    " I love this book - the drama of the discovery of DNA, with a biased point of view, but oh so fascinating. As a biologist, I loved reading and watching the pieces come together. Dr. Watson paints a vivid picture of the characters and events in this story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 1/12/2011

    " A thoroughly enjoyable tale that shows what a lot of science is really like. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim | 1/5/2011

    " This book was kind of "DNA for Dummies" for me. Having not gotten the science gene, I was generally wary of anything in that field. But this book made the discovery of DNA strands fascinating. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Evan | 12/10/2010

    " interesting to read, but Watson is kind of a condescending jerk, which takes away from it a bit "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alex | 12/6/2010

    " Hard to understand without good knowledge of chemistry/biology. But fascinating nevertheless to follow the struggle to discover DNA "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 11/20/2010

    " Highly opinionated memoir of the discovery of the structure of DNA. "

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About the Author

James D. Watson was director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York from 1968 to 1993 and is now its president. He was the first director of the National Center for Human Genome Research of the National Institutes of Health from 1989 to 1992. A member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society, he has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Science, and, with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1962.

About the Narrator

Dan Cashman is an American television actor, producer, and audiobook narrator who has also appeared in many television movies such as Dangerous Women, The Invisible Man, and The Pretender.