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Download Day (Unabriged) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Day (Unabriged) Audiobook, by Elie Wiesel
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,472 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Elie Wiesel Narrator: George Guidall Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2006 ISBN:
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First published in English under the title The Accident, Elie Wiesel's third novel in his trilogy of Holocaust literature has now adopted Wiesel's original title: Day. In the opening scene, a Holocaust survivor and successful journalist steps off a curb in New York City directly into the pathway of an oncoming cab. As he struggles between life and death, the journalist recalls the effects of the historical tragedy of the Holocaust on himself and his family. Like the memoir Night and the novel Dawn, Wiesel again poses important questions involving the meaning of almost an entire annihilation of a race, loss of faith in the face of mass murder and torture, and the aftermath and effects of the Holocaust on individuals and the Jewish people. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ian | 2/17/2014

    " Day was about a Holocaust survivor who got ran over by a taxi in New York, and while in the hospital he reflected on his past in the concentration camp. This book kind of started out boring at first, but as time went on, it progressively got more and more interesting. Also as time went on in the book, the memories got more and more deeper into thought and it really got me interested in the book, and after a while, I could not stop reading it. The book was related to Elie Wiesel's other books Night and Dawn, so I had a background as to what the book was about before reading it. I love Elie Wiesel's books because they are really good and he goes into depth about what's going on in his stories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristiana | 1/16/2014

    " Of course it was awesome, just like Night. And of course it made me depressed, but a must read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Johnson | 1/15/2014

    " One of those books that you read and feel heartbroken while reading it. I felt for him as I read and continuously wished I could reach out and help. Great read and quite interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sondra Wilson | 1/7/2014

    " The last in his 'trilogy' of stories meant to catapult one ungently into the world of grief that is an often overlooked but unforgettably powerful left over casualty of unspeakable tragedy like the Holocaust. This novella in particular, previously entitled The Accident, speaks to survivor guilt. It strikes you subtly at parts and sharpy at others with investigations of the self, the ability we have to destroy ourselves and others and where we can find the desire not to, or if we indeed can. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon O'Neill | 1/2/2014

    " I finally finished the "Night" trilogy. This deals with Wiesel as a young man in NYC, after getting hit by a taxi. He is still haunted by the past and questions living. Very beautiful passages in here. Each book of this trilogy is very short, but powerful. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jessica The Demigod | 12/24/2013

    " Again, Elie disapoints me with Day. I feel the same with Dawn. So much jibber jabber and fluff instead of exciting events. I absolutly loved Night because it was really exciting and sad at the same time. This story was just boring and didnt get me interested at all. Consider myself dissapointed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeannette | 12/12/2013

    " It would be strange to state that I "enjoyed" this book: rather it gave great pause for reflection on how we move on--or not--from personal, cultural, and/or societal human tragedy and horror. For sure an essential text to read: I only wish I had read the second in this series. and not just the first and third!: "Night," "Dawn," and "Day" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carrie | 12/7/2013

    " Interesting read and some controversial thinking in it. It is really, really depressing. Do NOT read this if you are looking for an inspirational, upbeat read. Pretty good book though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Juliana | 11/23/2013

    " One of my top five favorite books. A beautiful and heartbreaking read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 11/17/2013

    " I have wanted to read Ellie Wiesel and this book fell into my lap. It is very post war, depressed, existential, but the theme still resonates somewhat today. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lisa | 11/9/2013

    " I feel like I need an antidepressant after reading this. Sigh. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mary | 10/21/2013

    " It was not as good as Night but it was pretty good kinda confusing though..... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rashid | 10/21/2013

    " Sequel to Night.. beautiful.. and sad. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 9/7/2013

    " I don't how you survive something such as the Holocaust and make peace. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tim | 3/27/2013

    " It was OK. I guess I expected more because NIGHT was so powerful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rylan McQuade | 8/17/2012

    " Not as impressive as "Night" or "Dawn," but still really good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 dead letter office | 5/13/2012

    " apparently semi-autobiographical, it didn't especially resonate with me. in fact i was bored. that probably doesn't reflect well on my taste or character. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deborah | 5/12/2012

    " I found this to be more depressing than the other two books in the trilogy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deborah Sullivan | 4/20/2012

    " Wiesel fictionalizes his accident to examine ethics and morality for survivors. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 4/20/2012

    " Well written--an exploration of an interesting theme. I liked what his friend had to say at the end of the book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Patrick | 5/10/2011

    " Maybe the best was lost in translation to English - or maybe Wiesel succeeded too well in making me dislike his narrator, like the stranger on the boat. Maybe I just dislike the destructive preoccupation with the past. For whatever reason, I didn't enjoy more than a few parts. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cristina | 5/3/2011

    " I wanted to love this really, really bad. But, I didn't. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chuck | 4/13/2011

    " Not a coherent trilogy - or at least not in the traditional sense. An interesting combination however... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shelly | 3/25/2011

    " The nonfiction book was much better than the two ficton. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chantel | 1/11/2011

    " Horrifying,evil, mortifying- beyond words of sadness... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andy | 1/2/2011

    " "night" = 5 stars.

    "dawn" = 3 stars.

    "day" = 4ish stars.

    books like "night" are essential school reading for a reason. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Irene | 12/27/2010

    " Night was very spiritual but the other 2 books are just ok "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shelia | 12/6/2010

    " This book included 3 short stories. The first story while sad was much more interesting than the other two stories. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 10/25/2010

    " This is a really important book. It was torture to read because it was about the holocaust.. but everyone needs to read this when they're mature enough to handle it, so this never happens again. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jill | 10/18/2010

    " Night (his memoir) was fantastic. Dawn and Day (his novels), were a sad attempt to be a writer. Night by itself get's 4 stars. The others, 1. "

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About the Author
Author Elie WieselELIE WIESEL was fifteen years old when he was deported to Auschwitz. After the war he became a journalist and writer in Paris, and since then has written more than fifty books, both fiction and nonfiction. His masterwork, Night, was a major best seller when it was republished recently in a new translation. Wiesel has been awarded the United States Congressional Gold Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the French Legion of Honor's Grand-Croix, an honorary knighthood of the British Empire, and, in 1986, the Nobel Peace Prize. Since 1976, he has been the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University.
About the Narrator

George Guidall, winner of eighty AudioFile Erphones Awards, has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for Excellence in Audiobook Narration. In 2014 the Audio Publishers Association presented him with the Special Achievement Award for an audiobook narrator of exceptional stature and accomplishment. During his thirty-year recording career he has recorded over 1,100 audiobooks, won multiple awards, been a mentor to many narrators, and shown by example the potential of fine storytelling. Among Guidall’s narration achievements are Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, and John Irving’s A Widow for One Year, which earned him an Audie Award for best unabridged narration of a novel, an honor he captured again for his rendition of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True. Guidall’s forty-year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie Award for best performance off Broadway, and frequent television appearances.