Extended Audio Sample

Download Cruzando la Frontera (Texto Completo) Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Cruzando la Frontera (Texto Completo) (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Ruben Martinez
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (229 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ruben Martinez Narrator: Dario Tangleson Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2007 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

This title is in Spanish

This is the tale of the Chavez family of Michoacan, Mexico. Members of this family cross over the border to work in the United States, only to encounter hardship and tragedy. It is an exploration of what drives poor Mexican families to risk their lives to come north.

Emmy Award-winning journalist and poet Rubén Martínez is the associate editor at Pacific News Service.

Download and start listening now!

BK_RBAL_000056

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thing Two | 2/6/2014

    " Very well written non-fiction book about the Chavez family from Cheran in southern Mexico and how they are drawn back and force across the border with the US. When Martinez published this, he was a journalist working from California who set off to do a story about three Chavez brothers who died in a traffic accident outside of San Diego. What he gives us is a story of life in the twentieth century post the Simpson-Mazzoli Act of 1986 for Mexican citizens who come into the United States to farm tobacco, butcher cattle, and generally help small businesses survive by doing jobs either thought too dangerous, too tedious, or too low-paying for the American worker. This is very readable, and dispelled numerous "truths" I'd grown to believe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donnie | 2/1/2014

    " I had to read this book for a class. I enjoyed it, and I was given a deeper look into the immigration issue in the US. The author is sensitive and a good writer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 1/29/2014

    " This book was fascinating in that Martinez explored all different types of border crossers and all different types of communities in the U.S. where border crossers find work. It is also a great road trip book, which is ironic because the entire book was essentially born out of tragedy along one of the highways that illegal immigrants use to get to the U.S. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 K-tron | 1/28/2014

    " sad truth of what it takes to enter a country where one day you are wanted, the next you are not. Tragic, sad, yet hopeful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarina | 1/24/2014

    " I immediately hit it off with this guy. I can relate to his experience in many ways. Identifying oneself as Mexican-American is tricky (as I'm sure is true for most second-& third- generation immigrants), with complexities of culture, privilege & lack of it, class all weaving themselves in to inform where you now stand & how others perceive you. Little bits of his story, like the men singing "Volver, Volver" at a bar hit home for me, as that is the song of Mexicans who have lost their home & yearn to return, the drunken cry & beautiful refrain of so many nights my family has spent together, getting lost in their own stories & loss- of culture, home, stability. This book is about Martinez as he follows the immigrant trail through various places in Mexico clear to the United States. It's a potent take on the whole immigrant identity thing, as Martinez is a second-generation immigrant, a United States citizen, & so does not have to go through the harrowing & dangerous journeys guided by unsympathetic coyotes & his own sense of adventure & dedication to his journalism. The places are all familiar to me, in look & feel & sameness of character to my own family, & so I loved this book. The story is important, the words are very readable, connected, not detached like they could be when you're mostly telling someone else's story. I loved this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 1/21/2014

    " I read this book for class, and I found it really well written and interesting, because it examines Mexican migrant workers from the vantage point of a small, poor town in Mexico. I know a lot about Mexican-American immigration from the US side, but I had never really learned much about what they were leaving/going back to in Mexico before I read this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Danielle | 1/16/2014

    " This was a very informative book to read. Some of the stories just broke my heart. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liz | 1/6/2014

    " A fascinating piece of journalism about the families who migrate between the middle of Mexico and jobs in the USA. Really nicely done. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 12/10/2013

    " The author follows migrant families from their hometown in Cheran, Michoacan to various cities in the United States. It tells the story of so many people that I know. Everyone who has an opinion about immigration to the U.S. from Mexico should read this for information and insight. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bradley Scott | 12/7/2013

    " Fantastic book! I particularly appreciated learning about the Purepecha culture and getting a vivid sense of the here and there of immigration. It's rare for new immigrant families to travel back and forth each year - that was a surprise. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clare Savage | 12/5/2013

    " Another book for book club. We really had a great discussion about this book. As a social worker, I found it beneficial to hear the individual stories about the issues of immigration. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 kendra | 11/30/2013

    " this book is like the journalist's version of t.c. boyle's tortilla curtain. a pretty good read, though somewhat out of date in this, the "post 9/11." if anyone has a suggestion on a more current migrant worker non-fiction, i'd love to read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicolas Shump | 11/30/2013

    " Martinez actually comes across the border with a family of immigrants and writes about the experience on both sides of the border. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie | 11/27/2013

    " I'm listening to the Spanish audio recording of this book. It's a great look on how immigration is changing life here in the US and back in Mexico. Very insightful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kellie | 11/10/2013

    " A glimpse into the lives of undocumented Mexican workers migrating in and out of the US. It was particularly interesting to see how this pattern has affected Indian culture in Mexico - an aspect of immigration I had never thought about before. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 William Torgerson | 6/3/2013

    " Some people come to the United States illegally to find work. If you've never considered the possibility that such a person is a hero, (especially to their family) this book might give you something to think about. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tracy | 5/11/2013

    " This was our most recent Book Club selection ... and an excellent choice! It was an eye-opening account about life in Mexico and in particular, immigration. It personalized the issue for me and made for an excellent and thought-provoking Book Club discussion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patricia | 3/5/2013

    " I found this so interesting and I learned a lot about migrants. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly | 1/20/2013

    " I read this for a class and the plight and trials of these "undocumented and unprotected" immigrants still resonates with me. It did humanize the immigration issue for me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lee | 11/14/2012

    " This book chronicles the experiences of a Mexican family who come to the United States illegally to work. Given the current policy debate and obvious ignorance of many, this book sheds important light on the issue "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Liz Bode | 6/26/2012

    " Really gave me perspective on immigration, the book is 10 yrs old but feel that it is still relevant "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah Jane | 4/30/2012

    " Creative non-fiction about the daily struggles of migrant workers both in Mexico and the U.S. Really informative, well written, and honest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marissa | 3/27/2012

    " A revelatory look at the lives & experiences of Mexican migrants. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenaro | 3/23/2012

    " I really enjoyed this book. It hit home for me and it reminded me of my journey from Mexico to Los Angeles when I was 8. The prejudices that occur on both sides of the border once you leave your home town are clear in this book and real. I highly recommend it to anyone who has left their home town. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 12/25/2011

    " Brilliant--everyone between the Mexican and Canadian Borders should read this, and more than a few on the other side as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melisa | 7/27/2011

    " This was a remarkable book. The writing is lovely, the personal stories are poignant and moving. If you want to get a better understanding of some of the underlying issues surrounding our current immigration debate, do read this and learn. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 William | 5/31/2011

    " Some people come to the United States illegally to find work. If you've never considered the possibility that such a person is a hero, (especially to their family) this book might give you something to think about. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 FrogMom | 7/1/2010

    " A glimpse into the lives of undocumented Mexican workers migrating in and out of the US. It was particularly interesting to see how this pattern has affected Indian culture in Mexico - an aspect of immigration I had never thought about before. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Liz | 5/11/2010

    " A fascinating piece of journalism about the families who migrate between the middle of Mexico and jobs in the USA. Really nicely done. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 8/10/2009

    " Brilliant--everyone between the Mexican and Canadian Borders should read this, and more than a few on the other side as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy | 5/17/2009

    " The author follows migrant families from their hometown in Cheran, Michoacan to various cities in the United States. It tells the story of so many people that I know. Everyone who has an opinion about immigration to the U.S. from Mexico should read this for information and insight. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annie | 2/21/2009

    " I'm listening to the Spanish audio recording of this book. It's a great look on how immigration is changing life here in the US and back in Mexico. Very insightful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 K-tron | 1/26/2009

    " sad truth of what it takes to enter a country where one day you are wanted, the next you are not. Tragic, sad, yet hopeful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicolasshump | 1/9/2009

    " Martinez actually comes across the border with a family of immigrants and writes about the experience on both sides of the border. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly | 3/31/2008

    " I read this for a class and the plight and trials of these "undocumented and unprotected" immigrants still resonates with me. It did humanize the immigration issue for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clare | 11/28/2007

    " Another book for book club. We really had a great discussion about this book. As a social worker, I found it beneficial to hear the individual stories about the issues of immigration. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations