Extended Audio Sample

Download Crime and Punishment (Audio Connoisseur Edition) Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Crime and Punishment (Audio Connoisseur Edition) (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (189,776 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky Narrator: Charlton Griffin Publisher: Audio Connoisseur Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2008 ISBN:
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This magnificent novel is about the murder of a miserly, aged pawnbroker and her younger sister by a radical, destitute St. Petersburg student named Raskolnikov, and the emotional, mental, and physical effects that follow. It is a remarkable masterpiece about a man's turbulent inner life and his relationship to others and to society at large. Dostoevsky explored the human condition on many levels in this great piece, and among the main themes the novel explores is the rather strange theory that criminals have a spiritual need to be punished - that indeed they demand it. Today we might think of this as masochism and dismiss Dostoevsky's thesis as the powerful wanderings of a mind steeped in the mysticism of the Eastern Orthodox Church. But this wonderful classic is far more complex.

Raskolnikov the intellectual divides humanity into two types: the meek, submissive mass of mankind and the Supermen. The Nietzschean Superman can violate any law or principle to attain his beneficial ends. Since Raskolnikov has allied himself with the Superman, he intends to prove his superiority by committing a murder without remorse by eliminating an undesirable person.

The novel's central question is whether it is justifiable to commit an atrocity in order to improve humanity. Dostoevsky shows us that a person cannot control and direct his life solely with his reason and intellect, that free will is limited. Listen as one of the finest psychological novels ever written unfolds.

Translated by Constance Garnett. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Serradeniz | 2/15/2014

    " This is my all times favorite! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dean | 2/6/2014

    " Possibly my all time favourite. Evil genius. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandy | 2/4/2014

    " A much easier read than I expected, though quite long (over 500 pages). I wouldn't recommend the Kindle version though....the translator made several English errors, which the editors apparently didn't pick up....this sort of bothered me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katherine | 1/28/2014

    " There is something really satisfying about getting through a dense Russian classic during the winter. I don't know that I can add anything worthwhile to the wealth of criticism on Dostoyevsky, so I won't say too much. Crive and Punishment was interesting to me because of how easy it was to sympathize and even relate to its desperate antihero, Raskolnikov, as well as the range of other disparate characters. The story is a full immersion into another time, place, and circumstance; and what more can you ask for from a novel than to be taken somewhere you can't actually go? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Trevar | 1/23/2014

    " Looking back on it, I liked this book more the first time than this time. The concept is good, but the Dostoevsky style is just too... too much. If he kept more focus on the main character's internal struggle, perfect. But as is, I must downgrade it from the first rating I gave it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katrina | 1/22/2014

    " I thought this would be hard going but not at all - another great story and totally deserving of it's place in the library of great classic literature. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dave Gold | 1/16/2014

    " In my effort to read the best classic fiction, I read this book around 2001 or so. I have to say, of the books on that list, I felt this was the worst. The plot is simple, and in this day and age, is very dated. The characters argue with each other endlessly and monotonously, which is 95% of the book, plot being the remaining 5%. I cannot understand why this is considered to be such a classic; I do not recommend it unless you feel like being tortured and bored. It was a chore to read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gwen Vila | 1/15/2014

    " A classic that's an accessible page-turner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ghinwa | 11/19/2013

    " One of my all-time favorites. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ulvia | 11/7/2013

    " This is one of the best books that i have ever read. Everyone should read this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tiahala | 10/1/2013

    " The main character frustrated me with his poor decisions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mack | 9/10/2013

    " Page turning crime, a lot of repetitive punishment. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie Lacouture | 5/30/2013

    " Though I'm not a fan of philosophy book. I would recommend this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Don | 2/14/2013

    " I read this in high school. My mom recommended it to me. I just love this story of murder, guilt and ultimatly, redemption. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dorothy Sinclair | 11/23/2012

    " One of the best books I have ever read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Willem Pije | 11/4/2012

    " I had a really hard time getting through this book. i could only read for about 20 pages per day. but if i look back, it certainly was worth it. dostojevski really has something to tell "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Jeffrey Purchal | 5/7/2012

    " It has been way to many years, so maybe it is time to revisit this work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexandra Chubachi | 7/30/2011

    " Very interesting. Dostoyevsky creates a feeling of anxiety the whole way through the book and I was constantly wondering how it was going to play out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 4/27/2011

    " Gotta love Russian literature! And the psychological aspect + love story + almost an Edgar Allen Poe-ish murder mysteryness makes it an altogether fantastic novel! (as long as you can stand the length) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Yoshitaka Goto | 12/5/2010

    " Didn't like, but contrary to popular opinion, I liked the epilogue. I guess I'm a sucker for corny happy endings. I think I'll let this book sit for a bit and read again later and more seriously. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vikas | 2/27/2010

    " C&P is the brightest star in the galaxy of Dostoyevsky. This book states the mental trauma a youth faces after committing a murder. Throughout this novel he tries to defend his crime before admitting it at last. This book contains literature and philosophy of supreme class. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Scott | 10/4/2009

    " How Crazy People Justify their Insanity. "

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About the Author

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821–1881) was a Russian novelist, journalist, and short-story writer whose psychological penetration into the darkest recesses of the human heart had a profound and universal influence on the twentieth-century novel. He was born in Moscow, the son of a surgeon. Leaving the study of engineering for literature, he published Poor Folk in 1846. As a member of revolutionary circles in St. Petersburg, he was condemned to death in 1849. A last-minute reprieve sent him to Siberia for hard labor. Returning to St. Petersburg in 1859, he worked as a journalist and completed his masterpiece, Crime and Punishment, as well as other works, including The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.