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Download Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Rob Walker
3.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 53.7 out of 5 3.70 (30 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Rob Walker Narrator: Robert Fass Publisher: AudioGO Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2008 ISBN:
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Marketing executives and consumer advocates alike predict a future of brand-proof consumers, armed with technology and a sophisticated understanding of marketing techniques, who can effectively tune out ad campaigns. But as Rob Walker demonstrates, this widely accepted misconception has eclipsed the real changes in the way modern consumers relate to their brands of choice. Combine this with marketers' new ability to blur the line between advertising, entertainment, and public space, and you have dramatically altered the relationship between consumer and consumed. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 2/17/2014

    " I am just not connecting with this for some reason. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Desiree | 2/10/2014

    " I really enjoyed this book about marketing. While it's not my favorite subject, I liked the stories about the new style of "murketing" that corporations have been doing! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Saxon | 1/20/2014

    " Walker attempts to figure out the secret behind successful advertising and brands in this new age of marketing. While Walker tells some pretty interesting stories about various companies and their advertising campaigns, the book gets a little redundant and you kinda begin to feel like Walker is telling you the same thing every chapter. Nevertheless, a worthwhile read for anyone who thinks they are immune to advertising or scoffs at the idea of fashion or brands being apart of our identity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alisa | 1/15/2014

    " A relevant good read for anyone in marketing or intrigued with the psychology of consumption. Unlike most marketing books, this one is well-written in a clear, inquisitive tone. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Megan | 1/9/2014

    " interesting read. i feel like the title implies a book that's built on the "if i buy X, that means Y" premise, but that's not the case. seems misleading to me, but not in a horrible sort of way. it's more about what kinds of brands you buy and why you buy them/what marketing strategies have evolved and succeeded over the years and where marketing can go in the future. that pretty much says it all. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Beth Chandler | 1/7/2014

    " Eh. A mildly interesting browse. I ditched even browsing about 2/3 through. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aaron | 12/31/2013

    " Nice analysis of modern American marketing. Nothing that should really surprise anyone though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave | 12/31/2013

    " The studies quoted and the products considered are pretty fascinating. I rank this above the Malcolm Gladwell fare, though it is similar. The theories and assertions ring true to me, but like Gladwell fare, in the end, I'm not sure that I left with much more than fascinating anecdotes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 12/31/2013

    " Exploration of the evolving relationships between people, brands and meaning. Well written, original and thought-provoking in the tradition of Gladwell. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tim | 12/29/2013

    " entertaining and thought provoking. thoroughly enjoyed it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chip Miller | 12/13/2013

    " An entertaining and insightful look at the interplay between brands and culture. Not really a Marketing book, more like a book of Sociology and Consumer Behavior. Some great take-aways... certainly an interesting book for any western consumer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ryan | 11/25/2013

    " Marketing is fascinating, and this book gives you an inside look about the trends, the people, and the dialogue between "what we buy and who we are". It gets rid of a lot of half-baked cliches and shows us the complicated relationship we have with marketers and how they are us and we are them. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah Ayars | 7/26/2013

    " Very interesting - the idea that far from being immune to adverts, we're well aware of what they're doing and we're more or less okay with it. That we buy into certain brand images (Apple, Nike), as well as build them into what we want them to be (PBR, Ecko). Fascinating read! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Caitlyn | 6/24/2013

    " Always seemed to end tantalizingly before saying anything really meaningful; was too cautious about criticism of any trend/activity he analyzed. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nina! | 6/20/2013

    " Interesting book, but it didn't seem to go anywhere "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gerald | 4/19/2013

    " The author argues with numerous examples, that marketing, as we know it, is a dying art. If nothing else, Mr. Walker as caused me to consider new directions for my products. I recommend "Buying In..." for anyone who is responsible for marketing products. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephanie | 5/31/2012

    " If you don't know all the ways that you are being 'murketed' to every day you may want to read this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eva | 3/15/2012

    " An insightful and at times scary look into the power of branding in today's world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kai | 1/13/2012

    " Rob Walker is an insightful and eloquent writer. His assessment of the relationship between the consumer and the products we consume is complex and eye opening, he turns the current notion that we as consumers are becoming immune to advertising and marketing on its head. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcus | 9/13/2011

    " Often interesting, but extremely repetitive in making its point with example after example, written as if only to justify the number of pages produced. More interviews with insiders asking, "Why or How?" would've been better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danielle | 5/26/2011

    " While I enjoyed the subject and talking points of the book, this book is more for those with either little or no background in what the author calls murketing. If you're already familiar with the term and examples thereof, you might want to skip this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Acacia | 2/17/2011

    " This book sets out to answer the question: So if I'm immune to advertising and I think its stupid, why is it that I love my chucks and drink a shitty beer called PBR? Worth thinking about. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcus | 1/3/2011

    " Often interesting, but extremely repetitive in making its point with example after example, written as if only to justify the number of pages produced. More interviews with insiders asking, "Why or How?" would've been better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 3/30/2010

    " Reading again, to pay closer attention. Because I know you now. And I want to know more about me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gerald | 2/4/2010

    " The author argues with numerous examples, that marketing, as we know it, is a dying art. If nothing else, Mr. Walker as caused me to consider new directions for my products. I recommend "Buying In..." for anyone who is responsible for marketing products. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amber | 12/10/2009

    " This book had a few interesting things but overall the book was somewhat boring. It would be a great book if you had to write a paper. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shawn | 12/8/2009

    " Very interesting use cases about how companies changed how they appeared to consumers. Sometimes without their own involvement in the cases of Timberland and Pabst Blue Ribbon. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chip | 11/14/2009

    " An entertaining and insightful look at the interplay between brands and culture. Not really a Marketing book, more like a book of Sociology and Consumer Behavior. Some great take-aways... certainly an interesting book for any western consumer. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeff | 8/31/2009

    " Awesome discussion about why people buy what they do. Very current. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Patricia | 2/9/2009

    " not much of a consumer or brand-oriented so didn't hold my interest. "

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About the Author
Author Rob Walker

Rob Walker is a journalist covering design, technology, business, the arts, and other subjects. He writes The Workologist for the Sunday Business section of The New York Times, and contributes to a variety of other publications and media outlets. His most recent book, co-edited with Joshua Glenn, is the collection Significant Objects: 100 Extraordinary Stories About Ordinary Things. He is on the faculty of the Products of Design MFA program at the School of Visual Arts.

About the Narrator

Robert Fass is a veteran actor and seven-time nominee for the prestigious Audie Award, winning in 2011 and 2013. He is equally at home in a wide variety of styles, genres, characters, and dialects and has earned five Earphones Awards, including one for his narration of Francisco Goldman’s Say Her Name, which was named one of AudioFile magazine’s Best Audiobooks of 2011. He has given voice to modern and classic fiction writers alike, including Ray Bradbury, Joyce Carol Oates, Isaac Asimov, Jeffrey Deaver, and John Steinbeck, as well as to nonfiction works in history, memoir, health, journalism, and business.