Extended Audio Sample

Download BBC Radio Shakespeare: Coriolanus (Dramatized) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample BBC Radio Shakespeare: Coriolanus (Dramatized) Audiobook, by William Shakespeare
4.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 54.36 out of 5 4.36 (11 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: William Shakespeare Narrator: Samuel West, Susannah York, and Full Cast Publisher: AudioGO Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2005 ISBN:
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BBC Radio has a unique heritage when it comes to Shakespeare. Since 1923, when the newly formed company broadcast its first full-length play, generations of actors and producers have honed and perfected the craft of making Shakespeare to be heard.

Coriolanus tells of a proud Roman general who captures the town Corioli but subsequently falls from favour with the Roman people. He allies himself with the Volscians and leads an attack on Rome, but allegiances are won and lost before the final tragic end.

Revitalised, original, and comprehensive, this is Shakespeare for the new millennium. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bri | 5/25/2011

    " My first time reading this play. I loved discussing the inconsistencies and binaries present with my ENGL 251 class. Now I'm hankering to see the play live on stage. In the meantime, anyone have a favorite movie version? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Peter | 5/23/2011

    " Playing the parts of Brabantio and Gratiano this summer in a local production. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa | 5/17/2011

    " Hands down my favorite of Shakespeare's tragedies! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 F. | 5/15/2011

    " I read this in high school. I need to read it again. It's been a while. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 dameolga | 5/3/2011

    " I enjoyed Iago's manipulations though I still felt he was the bad guy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 5/2/2011

    " Very dramatic. Iago, a very interesting character. Very tragic. Good stuff. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nicole | 4/28/2011

    " I absolutely love this play! I got into Shakespeare when I started at my second college and this is by far one of his best plays! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ruth | 4/27/2011

    " Reading the play left me morbidly impressed with Iago, bored with Othello, and weepy over the fruitless loss of all of the good people. I henceforth swear to be a less jealous person. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Safraz | 4/25/2011

    " Iago is the greatest villain in English literature. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sara | 4/24/2011

    " Easily my favorite Shakespeare. I think Iago might be the best villain of all time ever.

    Also, this gets extra props for spawning the opera, which, though deviates from the plot significantly, is still quite good in its own right.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Judith | 4/23/2011

    " Currently re-reading. I've forgotten how good Shakespeare can be... "

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About the Author
Author William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (1564–1616), English poet and dramatist of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean period, is the most widely known author in all of English literature and often considered the greatest. He was an active member of a theater company for at least twenty years, during which time he wrote many great plays. Plays were not prized as literature at the time, and Shakespeare was not widely read until the middle of the eighteenth century, when a great upsurge of interest in his works began that continues today.