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Download Antony and Cleopatra Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Antony and Cleopatra Audiobook, by Colleen McCullough Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,992 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Colleen McCullough Narrator: Sneha Mathan Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Related: The Masters of Rome Series Release Date: December 2007 ISBN: 9781482977356
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Mark Antony, famous warrior and legendary lover, expects that he will be Julius Caesar’s successor. But when Caesar is murdered, his eighteen-year-old nephew, Octavian, is named as his heir. No one, least of all Antony, expects Octavian to last; but his youth and slight frame conceal a remarkable determination and a sharp strategic mind. Under Octavian’s rule, the empire is divided, with Antony responsible for the fabulously rich East. 

There he meets Cleopatra, who is still mourning Caesar, her lover and the father of her only son. Despite his marriage to Octavian’s sister, Antony is fascinated by the Egyptian queen. Drawn together by grief, ambition, passion, and politics, they begin a very public love affair, and the tension between Antony and Octavian, already simmering, soon threatens to erupt into war.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Once she finds her sandaled footing, McCullough delivers an impassioned novel whose pages don't turn fast enough.”

    Entertainment Weekly

  • “Crafted with the same attention to detail as its predecessors, and the descriptions of food, clothing, weaponry and tactics, religious practices, and the labyrinthine complexities of Roman family relationships and political alliances, all help to produce the quasi-cinematic illusion of reality on which historical fiction relies.”

    The Age (Melbourne)

  • “[McCullough] writes clearly, keeps the action going and has a firm control…Few have tried harder than McCullough to bring ancient Rome to a broad audience.”

    Washington Post

  • “The tragic denouement is, in McCullough’s capable hands, no less compelling for being so well known. As with the previous volumes in this series, the author’s scholarship and larger-than-life characters bring a tempestuous Rome to life.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “McCullough creates tension and pathos through her complex and rich writing.”

    Library Journal

  • “Outsized personages richly recast against a convincing backdrop will keep readers riveted throughout Antony’s slow unraveling and ultimate sacrifice, and Octavian’s methodical ascent.”

    Kirkus Reviews

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aine Dunne | 2/16/2014

    " Not the best written book I've ever read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rozonda | 2/16/2014

    " Refreshing view on Cleopatra, Antony, Octavius and other characters. Ms McCullough brings them to life in an amazingly intelligent and realistic way. Beautiful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eve | 2/9/2014

    " This is the seventh book in McCullough's Masters of Rome series, and the ingredients are still pretty much the same as in the previous books - wars, politics, domestic scenes, more wars and politics. Recommended if you're already used to McCullough's prose style and universe, or very much interested in this period of Roman history. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Clara Marshall | 2/5/2014

    " I was disappointed by this book. It was as though McCullogh was going trying to cram as much history into the book as she could. Instead of just focussing on the main protagonists the reader was treated to the view points of too many characters who were far from convincing. After the fantastic first books in the Masters of Rome series, this book left me saddened knowing that a great author was coming to the end of her literary life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 2/5/2014

    " The seventh book in the Founders of Rome series is as juicily entertaining as ever, although (much like the second season of HBO's "Rome") it occasionally feels like McCullough's writing on fast-forward, covering major events in a few gossipy but abrupt paragraphs. This has the advantage of packing events in and moving the narrative along nicely, and the disadvantage of depriving the characters of what could have been a much greater degree of complexity. No doubt part of the problem lies in the fact that McCullough simply has not succeeded in creating another character as alluring as the dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla, the flawed and feral aristocrat who dominated the first half of the series. By now, her kid-glove treatment of her beloved blond Caesars - Julius and Octavian, as well as an ever-perfect series of Julian women always radiantly happy to be married off for political gain - has come to seem a tad saccharine. By presenting us with this family of Aryan supermen who can do no wrong, McCullough bypasses all the sweaty politicking, double-dealing, and outright buggery (figurative and literal) that are well-attested in the sources, ironically buying into the very same propaganda that Octavian elaborated to whitewash them. Meanwhile, her Antony, smeared by the same two-thousand-year-old brush, appears as a relative nonentity, weak, indecisive, and ruled by his appetites, while her Cleopatra, rather improbably, is portrayed as totally dominated not by Antony but by her son Caesarion, a miniature clone of his father right down to the inevitable blond curls and precocious displays of genius. None of which should put any geniune lover of Roman history off from reading this book for a minute. There's much to be learned from it, from Antony and Octavian's long struggle to wrest control of Rome's grain supply from Sextus Pompeius, a son of Pompey the Great turned Mediterranean pirate, to satisfying asides about what to do with retiring veterans, settling German tribes on the Rhine, and the annoyances of riding without stirrups, that should delight anyone versed in the archaeological and historical sources. And in between the flourishes that show how impressively McCullough has done her homework, something of major interest is always happening, in the tradition of the best soap operas. It's just that this particular soap opera could have been better, if the Caesars hadn't been so squeaky clean. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 1/30/2014

    " Post-Caesar, Octavian(later Augustus) and Marc Antony battle to be the next Caesar. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Diane | 1/19/2014

    " I've enjoyed this entire series and am a bit sad that there will be no more. Does anyone know of other historical novels that pick up this story? I have read some of Steven Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa mysteries as well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Penny | 12/21/2013

    " I loved her The Thornbirds sooo many years ago. This one was just so historical. I mean every battle and almost every thought was covered. I figured it was a novel so I'd be reading a bit more romance, but this was not the book for romance. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leah Cook | 12/4/2013

    " This book is difficult to get into. Its well written, but it's also somewhat boring and flavorless. There are some very quirky, humorous passages that keep me reading it, but like the Thorn Birds it can also be diffuse and meandering. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Maggie Tideswell | 10/25/2013

    " I did not enjoy this book. Too much information detracted from the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 10/24/2013

    " Great book. Really brought Anthony and Cleapatra to life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristi | 10/10/2013

    " i really liked this book! i am a huge fan of rome and egypt and thought this wove history and fiction together very well. it is one i put up on my "to be read yearly" bookshelf. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather | 1/7/2013

    " I found that this was a sequal and I would like to read the first book before progressing to this one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Faye | 12/28/2012

    " Good read, could be slow at times but good blend of history with fiction. Recommended for those who enjoy historical novels. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kay | 12/7/2012

    " This is another in McCollough's multi-volume series on Rome. I enjoyed Caesar, and this one looks to be more of her excellent writing and thorough research. She novelizes historical figures, which I usually don't like, but in this case, it makes for a most enjoyable read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda Allen | 8/20/2012

    " The last of my Rome series (for now at least). Really enjoyed reading about this period of time "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Fee | 8/12/2012

    " Heavy going with all the ancient Roman history and names! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard | 4/5/2012

    " I love reading historically based novels written by female authors. Such a refreshing perspective. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cindy Prost | 1/19/2012

    " Everyone should read the entire series. Who knew that The Thorn Birds author could create such great historical novels. I was sorry when I was finished with the series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 9/15/2011

    " (urp) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rebecca Parnell | 7/11/2011

    " Loved it. So well done. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 VítÄ›zslav | 6/9/2011

    " saga doctena, republika umrela "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel | 5/28/2011

    " So far this is very good. I think it's interesting that she makes Antony and Cleopatra a more political union, a matter of practicality than real love. I always felt that her relationship with Ceaser was more political, but it is an interesting spin on things. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Glenn | 5/22/2011

    " Good but not the best of the series. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda | 4/28/2011

    " The last of my Rome series (for now at least). Really enjoyed reading about this period of time "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maria | 2/26/2011

    " I enjoyed this book although I did struggle with the unfamilar latin words. Also, some of the passages pertaining to politics and war strategies went way over my head and bored me. I wasn't familar with the Antony and Cleopatra saga and the novel kept me enthralled enough to read to the end. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sandra | 1/22/2011

    " This was a really compelling read, really going into depth about the issues that formed the relationship between Antony and Cleopatra. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lindsay | 12/12/2010

    " Too long; didn't read. Couldn't get into this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bebe | 12/3/2010

    " Book on CD - Colleen McCullough writes roman history like nobody else, this wraps up the series that started with "The first man in Rome" all books are a must read for history buffs, factual, exciting and soapy great stuff. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marjorie | 12/3/2010

    " Liked it, but was hard to read at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cindy | 11/5/2010

    " Everyone should read the entire series. Who knew that The Thorn Birds author could create such great historical novels. I was sorry when I was finished with the series. "

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About the Author
Author Colleen McCullough

Colleen McCullough (1937–2015) enjoyed worldwide renown, and her novels are bestsellers in a multitude of languages. She is the internationally acclaimed author of The Thorn Birds, Tim, An Indecent Obsession, A Creed for the Third Millennium, The Ladies of Missalonghi, The First Man in Rome, The Grass Crown, Fortune’s Favorites, Caesar’s Women, and other novels.

About the Narrator

Sneha Mathan spent a peripatetic childhood in India, punctuated by a short spell in the Seychelles. Now fixedly based in Seattle, she works as a voice actor and audiobook narrator. Her audiobook work has received four Earphones Awards, and she is a two-time finalist for the Audie Award.