Extended Audio Sample

Download Anthills of the Savannah Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Anthills of the Savannah Audiobook, by Chinua Achebe Click for printable size audiobook cover
2.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 5 2.80 (25 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Chinua Achebe Narrator: Prentice Onayemi Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 31, 2035 ISBN: 9780525496649
Regular Price: $17.50 Pre-Order
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $15.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Pre-Order learn more )

A searing satire of political corruption and social injustice from the celebrated author of Things Fall Apart

In the fictional West African nation of Kangan, newly independent of British rule, the hopes and dreams of democracy have been quashed by a fierce military dictatorship. Chris Oriko is a member of the president's cabinet for life, and one of the leader's oldest friends. When the president is charged with censoring the opportunistic editor of the state-run newspaper--another childhood friend--Chris's loyalty and ideology are put to the test. The fate of Kangan hangs in the balance as tensions rise and a devious plot is set in motion to silence a firebrand critic. 

From Chinua Achebe, the legendary author of Things Fall Apart, Anthills of the Savannah is "A vision of social change that strikes us with the force of prophecy" (USA Today). 

Download and start listening now!

bjup

Quotes & Awards

  • Achebe has written a story that sidesteps both ideologies of the African experience and political agendas, in order to lead us to a deeply human universal wisdom. Washington Post Book World
  • [Anthills Of The Savannah] has wonderful satiric moments and resounds with big African laughter. The New York Review Of Books
  • Achebe moves effortlessly... creating a flurry of perspectives from which his story's dramatic and disturbing events are scrutinized. Anthills Of The Savannah... will prove hard to forget. It's a vision of social change that strikes us with the force of prophecy USA Today

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elizabeth | 2/19/2014

    " I'm sorry, I just couldn't get into this. There is something about political elites that make them very difficult to identify or sympathise with as characters. I just couldn't bring myself to care about any of them, and I kind of gave up on the story as a consequence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Esteban Gordon | 2/16/2014

    " I could have done without the interplay of first person narrative at the beginning, but as it progressed to more familiar third person (like TFA and No Longer at Ease) it became quite a compelling read. The examination of the role of reform versus revolution and personal responsibility was very thought provoking. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 LeAnna | 2/13/2014

    " I went ahead and finished this book, even though I wasn't really enjoying it. I don't usually do that, but because it was small enough and concerned with real-life Africa, I thought I would give it a chance. I just couldn't really latch on to the style, I guess. Also, I think I'm not familiar enough with post-colonial Africa for it to make a lot of sense to me. The parts written in dialiect were really difficult to understand, and I think there is probably a lot of symbolic meaning throughout the book that I missed. I think if I had studied this in school alongside the history of post-colonial Africa, I would have gotten a lot more out of it. I don't really want to dismiss it totally, as I think it has more meaning than I could glean from it, but I did not feel that I learned a lot or felt a lot emotionally while reading it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gwen | 2/10/2014

    " It's pacing was a little strange, but I really enjoyed his message. It felt like I was peeking into someone else's culture, instead of them explaining it to me, which again, was enjoyable. It was not a book written for me, and that was pretty clear. Since it was about the corruption in a West-African state I felt it was a concious choice to make it a book by and for Africans. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joanne | 1/25/2014

    " Lacks plot, characters are thin...it's a sociology lesson. 'Nuf said. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Steve Scott | 1/8/2014

    " Slow, dull read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob Clarkin | 12/25/2013

    " Life-changing . . . . . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerry | 12/19/2013

    " My first book by Achebe. I found it a bit slow at first but extremely rewarding, particularly because of his ability to comment on tribal and city politics and on human nature. A very good read if you are interested in Africa and in particular Nigeria. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jeana | 12/16/2013

    " I just could not get into this book. I gave it almost 60 pages and my interest was just not piqued. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven Salaita | 12/15/2013

    " This is a good novel that deals with a number of colonial and neocolonial motifs. It lacks the simple magic of Things Fall Apart, but allows Achebe to use a different style, one definitely worth checking out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 11/23/2013

    " A bit of a slow start for my taste, with an abrupt finish. Still, well written and a good read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 11/14/2013

    " A little more academic and literary for my tastes (took me forever to figure out who the characters were since the narration kept switching back and forth), but it did offer an interesting perspective on African politics and culture. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kyle | 10/29/2013

    " Great ideas and definitely solid in stretches, but the scope is too large and the narrative is unbalanced "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe Sherman | 10/17/2013

    " I didn't like this. To me, brutal tyrants are not funny even when they are depicted as clownish buffoons. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rachel | 7/21/2012

    " Achebe is a wonderful writer. This is the book I read most recently and his depiction of trying to get ahead in Africa was very poignant. I need to go back and read the ones I read back in school- Things Fall Apart and No Longer at Ease "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shibbie | 6/9/2012

    " Starts off as a comical look at politics today (specifically, African politics, but really the themes transcend national/cultural borders), but gets all too deep. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ash | 9/8/2011

    " A wonderful read. Enjoyed this insightful book on what ails the continent--generation after generation. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Teresa | 7/1/2011

    " Not Achebe's best. A fairly straightfoward story of two friends caught in the regime of an increasingly crazy dictator. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe | 4/28/2011

    " I didn't like this. To me, brutal tyrants are not funny even when they are depicted as clownish buffoons. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsey | 2/15/2011

    " Achebe proves yet again that traditional tribal beliefs have a place in African modernity. A tragic, yet beautiful story of the effects of power in postcolonial Africa. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Phase3 | 12/5/2010

    " Had to force myself to finish this, it just didn't engage my interest. There was very little plot and too much prose that didn't add to the story. I preferred "Things Fall Apart" by the same author. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerry | 9/28/2010

    " My first book by Achebe. I found it a bit slow at first but extremely rewarding, particularly because of his ability to comment on tribal and city politics and on human nature. A very good read if you are interested in Africa and in particular Nigeria. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Emma | 10/27/2009

    " Maybe I should give it another go, since the idea is a very good one, but when I read this is bored me to tears.

    Are we allowed to say that about Penguins Classics without being handed a Dunce hat? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Steven | 7/26/2009

    " This is a good novel that deals with a number of colonial and neocolonial motifs. It lacks the simple magic of Things Fall Apart, but allows Achebe to use a different style, one definitely worth checking out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shibbie | 6/14/2009

    " Starts off as a comical look at politics today (specifically, African politics, but really the themes transcend national/cultural borders), but gets all too deep. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe (1930–2013) was a prominent Nigerian writer who is famous for his novels describing the effects of Western customs and values on traditional African society. His satire and keen ear for spoken language made him one of the most highly esteemed African writers in English. He published novels, essay collections, poetry, short stories, and juvenile fiction. Among his works are Things Fall Apart, Anthills of the Savannah, A Man of the People, Arrow of God, and the notable collections Morning Yet on Creation Day and Hopes and Impediments. A recipient of the Man Booker International Prize, he was the Charles P. Stevenson Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

About the Narrator

Prentice Onayemi is an Earphones Award–winning audiobook narrator and a voice and film actor who is known for his roles in The Steam-Room Crooner, AmeriQua, and as Joey in the Tony Award–winning play War Horse.