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Download Amazing Grace Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Amazing Grace (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Jonathan Kozol
4.14 out of 54.14 out of 54.14 out of 54.14 out of 54.14 out of 5 4.14 (36 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Jonathan Kozol Narrator: Dick Hill Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2010 ISBN:
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Amazing Grace is a book about the hearts of children who grow up in the South Bronx - the poorest congressional district of our nation.

The children we meet through the deepening friendships that evolve between Janathan Kozol and their families defy the stereotypes of urban youth too frequently presented on TV and in newspapers. Tender, generous, and often religiously devout, they speak with painful clarity about the poverty and racial isolation that have wounded but not hardened them.

It's not like being in a jail, says 15-year-old Isabel. It's more like being hidden. It's as if you have been put in a garage where, if they don't have room for something but aren't sure if they should throw it out, they put it there where they don't need to think of it again.

Without rhetoric, but drawing extensively upon the words of children, parents, and priests, this book does not romanticize or soften the effects of violence and sickness. Amazing Grace makes clear that the postmodern ghetto of America is not a social accident but is created and sustained by greed, neglect, racism, and expedience. It asks questions like, What is the value of child's life? What do we plan to do with those whom we have decided are superfluous? How tough do we dare to be?

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Windy | 2/19/2014

    " I just remember thinking how sad this book was. It made me wish I could bring those kids into my own home and provide for them. I'm so grateful I can provide so much for my own children. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melanie Harwood | 2/5/2014

    " In my top 5 best books I've ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 1/24/2014

    " New York City slums from the perspective of the kids that live there. The author's sincere attempt to describe life for a select group of kids by compiliting the results of numerous interviews. I knew there was extreme poverty in parts of New York City (and crime, drugs, higher rates of AIDS, gangs), but I had no idea that the "public services" (schools, hospitals, parks, and city services) were so, so bad....dirty hospital rooms that patients have to clean themselves, classrooms meeting in bathrooms, buildings not inspected by the City because inspectors didn't feel 'safe' entering, kids with an average asthma rate 9 times that of kids across town...seriously? You should read this. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 calandra | 1/17/2014

    " a good book on life in the inner city. kozol is an expert in this field of sociology. i read this book when i was interested in learning more about the troubled inner city. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meredith | 1/10/2014

    " I learned a lot about the hardships that inner-city folks face and the disparities in our society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Renate | 1/10/2014

    " (I'll go ahead and post this review for all Jonathan Kozol books). I really like what he writes about and how he does it. Kozol is pretty remarkable given he has devoted his life to putting the spotlight on societal issues and problems in urban communities -- all in the hopes of bringing about change. Sadly though not much has improved and there is little hope for a better future for the families that Kozol befriends and whose lives are portrayed in his books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim | 1/9/2014

    " Kozol researches the lives of families living in some of the worst neighborhoods in the country. What he finds surprises and confounds. The book made me angry for the unbearable difficulties these American children face. Government care, education and other solutions are almost laughable in their absurdity. It's a wonder anyone can pull themselves up out the slums. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 1/6/2014

    " It surreally opened my eyes to see that such stuff can happen in America in all places. It made me feel soiled and childish how I thought I was unhappy because of the situation I'm in. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren | 12/31/2013

    " This book hit home for me as Kozol writes about the disturbing yet real details of down and out urban children in real city schools. As a public school teacher in chicago, I connected to this text with respect to the children and their parents. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica | 12/30/2013

    " This book gives the inside look to children who grow up with less and speaks about those we fear the most, the poor "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eliza | 12/6/2013

    " Kozol alarms his readers that there is still a catastrophic problem in our educational system through beautifully written and moving stories of children and families all across america. A good combination of narrative and cold facts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 ylin002 | 9/20/2013

    " like Random Family, this book swallowed me whole, and was devastatingly upsetting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 8/13/2013

    " Read this book for my Just Faith class. It was a tough read in the aspect that it talks a lot about poverty in NYC and how things really haven't changed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarahberke | 7/30/2013

    " Just humbling. Makes us all want to quit our day jobs and go work for the rest of our lives with children in the South Bronx. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Donnie | 1/9/2013

    " Ya'll better get your Kozol on. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bayoumacs | 12/27/2012

    " This book will give you an appreciation of how people live in the inner city. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debbie | 12/22/2012

    " Insightful, disturbing look at poverty in the slums of New York City. Like the author, I'm left wondering what can be done to stop the cycle of abject poverty living right in the midst of us. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna Spanos | 11/18/2012

    " This book was incredible. Heartbreaking. Extremely well written. Unbearably sad. It exposes the worst of our society in a way that also exposes the best and the most resilient. I am so glad he is giving voice to these stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lily | 5/13/2012

    " well-written and interesting. no particularly mind-blowing conclusions for me though "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth Joyce | 12/15/2011

    " This was the first book by Kozol that I read. It left a lasting impression! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marty | 11/17/2011

    " I thought this book was just ok. To me it just felt off somehow. But it does give you a good picture of what it was like growing up in the places he visited in that time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melissa | 8/6/2011

    " People don't read this, or would b/c of some sociology class during their undergrad(shoot that's what I did) but I truely think its critical in our adult lives (as U.S. citizens, as voters) to understand what is going on in our social system - outside of our pretty little suburbs. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shari | 7/23/2011

    " I read this book for one of my education classes and found it very interesting. It gives a glimpse into the lives of many children and the struggles they face from living life in the bronx and how that affects their ability to be educated. I recall this being a tear jerker for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karoline | 5/3/2011

    " I think that this study/investigation into the lives of people living in the South Bronx in the early to mid 90's may still be indicitive of the forgotton population of NYC now.... truly an eye-opening book with the largest question facing this country: why can't we take care of people here? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Thomas | 4/13/2011

    " The documentary of a continual disgrace. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ron | 3/7/2011

    " Helped me realize what poverty was all about. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven | 2/24/2011

    " It is a tremendous tragedy that this book only becomes more relevant with time. Surely Kozol would have loved it to become an artifact rather than a continued implication of educational racism and bureaucratic incompetence. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 2/22/2011

    " Amazing glimpse into the lives of the less fortunate who happen to be our neighbors--breaks apart the myths and stereotypes of inner city folks trying to survive and what they do for their children to get ahead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Johannah | 1/18/2011

    " well written essay of poverty in the South Bronx in the 1990s. Kozol weaved stories and interviews of despair and sadness with glimmers of hope effortlessly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 9/26/2010

    " It surreally opened my eyes to see that such stuff can happen in America in all places. It made me feel soiled and childish how I thought I was unhappy because of the situation I'm in. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 9/22/2010

    " I couldn't bring myself to finish this book (though I came within 50 pages.) It was well-written and compelling, but god, so depressing. Which I guess is kind of the point (kind of), but I just couldn't go on. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carly | 9/1/2010

    " I really liked this book. It was heartbreaking but very interesting. It is focused on poverty and the terrible conditions that are prevalent in the poorest area of New York City- it is incredible how terrible conditions can be- even here in the U.S. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 8/15/2010

    " Racism in America. It exists. And Jonathan Kozol, in every book he writes, portrays this horrible cruelty with open eyes and an open heart. Everyone should read at least one of Kozol's books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jade | 7/28/2010

    " This is an important and moving book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shari | 7/23/2010

    " I read this book for one of my education classes and found it very interesting. It gives a glimpse into the lives of many children and the struggles they face from living life in the bronx and how that affects their ability to be educated. I recall this being a tear jerker for me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen | 6/12/2010

    " This book was made me choose to become an educator. Thank you Kozol. "

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About the Author
Author Jonathan Kozol

Jonathan Kozol is the National Book Award–winning author of Fire in the Ashes, Savage Inequalities, and Death at an Early Age, among others. He has been working with children in inner-city schools for nearly fifty years and is the most widely read and highly honored education writer in America.

About the Narrator

Dick Hill, named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine, is one of the most awarded narrators in the business, having earned several Audie Awards and dozens of AudioFile Earphones Awards. In addition to narrating, he has both acted in and written for the theater.