Extended Audio Sample

Download Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (697,288 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: B. J. Harrison Publisher: B.J. Harrison Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN:
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Huckleberry Finn is the original American maverick. He chooses the things that feel the most comfortable for him, regardless of what others may say. But when he is forced to flee his home, and comes into company with Jim, a runaway slave, his sound heart collides with his ill-trained conscience. Together, Huck and Jim journey down the Mississippi River, on an odyssey that has become one of the finest American Classics in the world of literature. This timeless novel is performed by award-winning Classic Tales narrator B.J. Harrison. It is an event you won't want to miss.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danny Teich | 1/24/2014

    " The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a very good book, and is also considered to be very important and representative of 19th century American society. Huck, the main character, is adventurous but at the same time naive about how his society works. It is good to have Huck's perspective, as the reader can learn about his world as he learns about it, and can also connect with Huck very well, and understand his thought processes. The book sends a message about how uncivilized people in Southern society were, ranging from families who locked themselves in a nonstop feud to foolish citizens who could not recognize their own family members. Often times Huck finds himself in difficult situations that expose his true character. Jim, as Huck's runaway slave partner, adds tension to the story (although it is difficult to understand what he says in his dialogue). One less good thing about this novel was the spots where major events are told very briefly, such as the King and Duke being tied up, as well as Jim suddenly being discovered to be free. But overall, Huck Finn is a very good book, and is a very important read for people who want to understand American society in the 1800s. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Isabella Mendicino | 1/15/2014

    " "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain is an awesome book and an interesting read! It's eye-opening to read a book filled of things I take for granted and common sense in the eyes of someone almost the opposite of me. Very good book. The only trouble I had was understanding some of the dialogue, in thought or words, because of the different way they talk. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kylei Allred | 12/14/2013

    " This book is ok I guess "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Angie | 12/5/2013

    " I will never think of melting butter or speaking French the same. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott Holmes | 10/30/2013

    " I do love this book although now when I reread it I read the more complete edition from the University of California. Just to mention here, though is the introduction by Toni Morrison and the afterword by Victor Doyno. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alfred Vanderbilt | 9/15/2013

    " Possibly the greatest wok of American literature. A wonderful book, as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Owen | 8/30/2013

    " This book is a wonder. If God were to judge America based on one character from literature, let's hope it's Huck Finn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hailey Sanden | 8/29/2013

    " The end made me want to drop Tom Sawyer in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Twain's writing makes it worth the read, though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nathan Jensen | 6/11/2013

    " I listened to this as an audio podcast for free. Go to iTunes and search it out. Amazing to listen to. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katiedavis | 6/9/2013

    " Upon re-reading, not a big fan of this. Just a bit repetitive and then abruptly ends. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Schroedette | 9/24/2012

    " Felt like I was supposed to like it. Couldn't really get into it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 6/13/2012

    " I love the portrayal of a time and place - even in the language used. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Skittle Booth | 5/27/2012

    " A darker, richer story than the Adventures of Tom Sawyer until the end when Tom Sawyer, rather unbelievably, reappears. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rich Kessler | 5/16/2012

    " This is one of those books I keep coming back to - over and over. Every reading (or retelling) gives me something new about Twain, or Huck, or Jim, or, maybe, just life in general. It is a wonderful book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa | 4/13/2012

    " The audio version of Huckleberry Finn was a very good performance by Elijah Wood, but I had trouble getting into the story and got frustrated with the characters. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anna Ben ezra | 3/20/2012

    " One of my favorite books of all time! "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.