Extended Audio Sample

Download Adam and Eve's Diaries Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Adam and Eves Diaries (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Mark Twain
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (81 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mark Twain Narrator: Walter Zimmerman, Cindy Hardin Killavey Publisher: Jimcin Recordings Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2007 ISBN:
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Here is Twain's humorous, but also touching, look at Adam and Eve, in which he presents two very different interpretations of Eden. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Keith | 6/22/2013

    " "The Shot" is a well done short story. It takes place in the 19th century in Russia. The story centers around military life and dueling. This duel though is done a little differently than the usual classic duel. I also believe that the author himself died as a result of a duel! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel | 4/25/2011

    " This is a very fun read with surprising depth. I love things like this that take familiar (to me) stories in a new direction. Hurrah for Twain! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 4/23/2011

    " loved it. sweet and funny. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Barbara | 4/19/2011

    " This was a surprise find. This book showed a different side of Mark Twain "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eliza | 3/21/2011

    " This is now one of my favorite books. The switching POV's provides a humorous and imaginative account of what it must have been like for the first man and woman. You'll laugh at lines like "Well, I do declare, if there isn't the dodo!" "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janet | 1/31/2011

    " This was a real good story. I really enjoyed it. A good read for all "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rebecca | 1/13/2011

    " Charming and insightful. I especially like the part where Adam referred to little Cain as an "unclassified zoological freak." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Stephanie | 1/6/2011

    " It was ok. Maybe I didn't find the satire very amusing because it's based on assumptions that are so far from my own perception of the "truth" about Adam and Eve. I did like the ending, though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda | 1/3/2011

    " Had it adapted for a theatrical reading. Love it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heidi | 12/29/2010

    " I laughed out loud~ I had to read it to Mark.....so funny. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Larashi | 12/12/2010

    " penuturan percakapan di kisah adam dan hawa ini bener2 lucu dan menggelitik
    ini bagian fav.nya
    sayang cerita2 selanjutnya agak sulit dipahami,,penuh pemikiran yang agak berbelit2. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bri | 11/19/2010

    " I am loving it so far, it is hilarious! The clever wit that Mark Twain uses throughout this ownderful read keeps me laughing. "

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About the Author
Author Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.