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Download A Woman of No Importance (Dramatized) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Woman of No Importance (Dramatized) Audiobook, by Oscar Wilde
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (3,252 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Oscar Wilde Narrator: Miriam Margolyes, Samantha Mathis, Rosalind Ayres, Jane Carr, Judy Geeson, Martin Jarvis, and full cast Publisher: L.A. Theatre Works Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2006 ISBN:
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Devilishly attractive Lord Illingworth is notorious for his skill as a seducer. But he is still invited to all the best houses, while his female conquests must hide their shame in seclusion. In this devastating drawing-room comedy, Oscar Wilde uses his celebrated wit to expose English society's narrow view of everything from sexual mores to Americans. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 1/29/2014

    " Another droll play by Oscar Wilde, this one showing the dark side of high society that takes itself out on women yet praises (or at least turns heads away at) men for the same deeds. Lord Illingworth is quotable, almost excessively so, becoming a superficial caricature rather than a super-wise libertine - and turns out to be quite an ass anyways. It's a plot remarkably ahead of its times in terms of women's liberation, even if it ultimately has to operate within the Victorian moral framework. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra | 1/27/2014

    " I quite liked this one! Thank you Mr. Wilde for writing such a delighting play with so many nice leading ladies. I found Hester, Mrs. Arbuthnot and even Mrs. Daubeny (even though she is just mentioned, and not a character in the play) all very inspiring women and I liked that the jokes for once didn't go completely over my head. I think reading a lot of Wilde actually helps because I'm starting to get his humor which makes the reading experience a lot nicer for me. The one thing that does annoy me quite a bit is how often Wilde has his characters repeat certain themes or sentences or even the structures in the dialogue. It takes away something of the dynamics in my opinion and ruins the natural flow of the conversation since I just can't believe that anyone would actually talk like that! But all in all I really did quite like this one, especially the women and the bad ending for the annoying male lead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Douglas | 1/25/2014

    " This was the 1st play read as part of a play reading group. We each take different characters and read the play together. This one was funny, but a bit hard to follow with many characters changing from person to person. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna | 1/24/2014

    " A play based on idea of a woman having a child with a man who has higher position than she and they weren't able to get married in a time when she was pregnant (but the chance happens after like 20 years). To read for Wilde's fans. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Han Jang | 1/17/2014

    " Entertaining, but not one of my favorites of Wilde's plays. A lot of witty conversations, not enough actual drama. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eirene | 1/13/2014

    " This play seemed somewhat different to me than other Oscar Wilde plays. Although it bore all the witticism that is Wilde's mark, it was chock full of truths that made it an amazing and revelational experience. Many of the maxims that are known from it are the cute quips made by the inane characters. However, the crux of the matter is that this play is making many startling comments about society- at the time constrained to the English upper class. However, because Wilde sets out truths, they hold true in any time and society. Never did I think to find such a startling example of Grace in a Wilde play, though it does not surprise me. I highly recommend it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah | 1/7/2014

    " Social commentary and brilliant humor wrapped into one. Another of Wilde's triumphs. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alexandra Butcher | 1/3/2014

    " I found this a little slow to start but I was not expecting the "reveal" and the ending. A good commentary on social and gender roles and inequalities and the idle rich. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 12/23/2013

    " A lot of the dialogue also appears in The Picture of Dorian Gray, but no matter, this was brilliant. I didn't think I'd enjoy reading a play but I couldn't put it down! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Theresa | 12/21/2013

    " I've only read his plays, but I have a serious satirical hard-on for Oscar Wilde. I would recommend this so anyone who has read Austin and had any strong feeling, positive or negative, towards it. Wilde is intensely hilarious and insightful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lavinia | 12/11/2013

    " Boy, how I missed Wilde! The wit, the language, the silly characters, the cynical and sarcastic comments. Do read (listen to / see the performance of) it. English only. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Frank | 10/10/2013

    " Full of wicked lines and cutting insight into social questions still being asked today. Always fun to hear opinions of a still young America. Not much has changed there either. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julia | 12/24/2012

    " Comical and quaint. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 11/3/2012

    " Can you tell I was bingeing on wit? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Denise | 5/30/2012

    " Not overly imaginative, this story, but well told. This is quick read, but as such, even less excuse not to read it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kim | 5/16/2012

    " This was an excellent play...maybe one of my favorite Wilde plays! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Florin Pitea | 5/15/2012

    " Another bitter drama about the double standards of late-Victorian high society, peppered with witticisms. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Esther | 4/8/2012

    " Wilde excels at the turn-you-inside-out theme. And it's not just a trick in this play, as you might think it to be in "The Importance of Being Earnest". What makes a person important is really the question here, and it's deftly handled. Wilde has mad skills - it would be hard to deny it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chrissey | 3/13/2012

    " it's oscar wilde, of course it's going to be amazing. it's very simple in terms of setting and it's pretty much all told in one night. again i do agree with a lot that's being said, even though to a lot of other people it might sound outrageous ;) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrice | 5/20/2011

    " This is my favorite Oscar Wilde play so far. It may be because I am a mother of a son.
    "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Donna | 5/19/2011

    " Women bear the shame of "losing theirs reputation". Men should share in this shame. Wilde's plays always make their points with sarcastic humor and irony. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Biskin | 5/16/2011

    " The story was annoying. But in true Wilde style, there were *so* many good lines. Worth the read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Emily | 5/15/2011

    " Brilliant and beautiful allusions and responses to Hawthorne. And a lead female who's an American Idealist and plays the violin ;) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Demmah | 2/14/2011

    " The ending was the one thing I did not like .
    the play was funny , smart and an easy read . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jason | 1/9/2011

    " While not as entertaining as Wilde's last major play, A Woman of No Importance (and Lady Windermere's Fan) have more of what one might call a "real-world" feeling--like such circumstances often did, and still could, happen to women and to men alike. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lara | 10/16/2010

    " Terrific one-liners, especially in the first act. Would love to watch this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anthea | 4/20/2010

    " One of, if not, Wilde's greatest play. Filled with love, humor and pain. Such beauty. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jake | 2/13/2010

    " Wilde is Wilde. Funny at places, but it's more or less rich people throwing big words and oxymoronic statements at each other. "

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About the Author
Author Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) was born in Dublin. He won scholarships to both Trinity College, Dublin, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was heavily influenced by the radical aesthetics of Walter Pater. Flamboyant wit and man-about-town, Wilde had a reputation that preceded him, especially in his early career. After publishing two volumes of short stories between 1887 and 1891, his social-comedy plays such as Lady Windermere’s Fan and The Importance of Being Earnest established his critical and commercial success. In 1895 Wilde was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment for homosexual conduct and died in Paris in obscurity a few years after his release.