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Download A Study Guide to the Poetry of Walt Whitman Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample A Study Guide to the Poetry of Walt Whitman Audiobook, by Kirsten Silva Gruesz
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (4,593 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Kirsten Silva Gruesz Narrator: Peter Strauss Publisher: Hachette Audio Format: Original Staging Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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Dramatic readings from Song of Myself, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, and Passage to India reveal the manner in which Walt Whitman's plain yet beautiful language redefined the world of poetry. An explorer of cultural thought and a lover of sensual pleasure, Whitman championed the causes of common men and reveled in emotional and physical love. Now experience what he felt with selections from his remarkable collection of poems, Leaves of Grass. In addition to the readings, this study guide includes an introduction to Whitman's life and a detailed discussion of his major works. Author Kirsten Silva Gruesz, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of English specializing in American Literature at the College of William and Mary, and a guest lecturer at both Yale and Harvard. This guide is part of the A+ AUDIO series from Time Warner, an innovative set of study materials that will help you to better understand, appreciate, and enjoy great works of literature. Look for other A+ titles from Audible in the Education section of Personal Development.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gorfo | 2/12/2014

    " The only reason I read Song of Myself is because it was constantly referred to in Paper Towns. The poem was beautiful, but also boring an confusing. While I expected Walt Whitman to talk about himself a lot, I didn't expect him to be quite so narcissistic! I wasn't that much of a Walt Whitman fan before I read this, but now he's reached an all time low in my eyes. Whitman pretty much says that he feels everyone's pain, he relates himself to God over and over again. He pretty much lists all the gods of all the religions at one point and says they don't exist! He seems apathetic, as he never seems to actually come to a conclusion about anything. Sure there were a few times when I was like "hey! this makes sense!" but then the overly descriptive depictions of pastors and the sea would meld together in a heap of nonsense again. All in all, Walt Whitman has the hugest ego to ever walk the planet! I'm glad I never knew him. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sónia | 1/14/2014

    " Gosto tanto :) Foi o poema 26 do Canto de Mim Mesmo que me fez descobrir a beleza dos sons :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Taylor Garton | 1/6/2014

    " I'm reading Walt Whitman's collection of poems in his book Leaves of Grass but by far my favorite, and the poem i would want to share with the world is Song of Myself. The first time i read through the poem i had a hard time comprehending what or who Whitman was talking about. So i had to read it again, and again and even a 3rd and yes 5th time. The more i read his words the more i became aware of his understanding of himself. Not only in this poem does write scenery but Whitman spends six pages just listening. To the wind, the people, the grass and the world. Whitman explores the grass, thinking that if he can understand something so simple, he must be able to learn more about humane nature and the world surrounding him."A child said What is grass? fetching it to me with full hands, How could i answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he. I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven. Or i guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation. Growing among black folks as well as white, i give them the same, I receive them the same. And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves(53). By reading this poem i not only got a better sense of how Whitman thinks but through him i was able to look at what i think of the world. "Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, Missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you(96). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ashley | 12/6/2013

    " I don't normally care for poetry but this little book was beautiful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ismael Galvan | 11/14/2013

    " There's nothing I can add to what's been said about this classic. Whitman is the American Buddha. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristin | 10/22/2013

    " this writing made my eyes tingle as the words turned into diamonds. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julia | 10/20/2013

    " The most beautiful poem ever written... plain and simple. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tim Minor | 10/10/2013

    " This haughty asshole is the reason poets have a bad name. God complex in high doses. If you ever catch yourself saying " I celebrate myself and sing MYSELF, and what I assume YOU shall assume"- punch yourself in the face for thinking your that omnipotent. Whitman was lucky he was writing in a era of women oppression or else Emily D would have sucker punched his arrogance in the balls. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mark Bratkowski | 9/15/2013

    " Whitman's imagery is awe-inspiring. His voice is musical and soulful. However, it was hard to understand what he was talking about at times. I understood less than half of it; I'll probably need to re-read it before my master's oral exam. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 KC | 2/15/2013

    " I know I'd enjoy this poem more if I knew how to read poetry, but I can't. Someday I'll learn how to. However, I liked the feeling of this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 anthony e. | 4/11/2012

    " My spirit has been forever enriched, deepen and expanded thanks to this book. I am in awe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Olive | 1/1/2012

    " Absolutely heady! Read it aloud or, even better, have it read to you. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elliott | 5/13/2011

    " May only be described as an epic poem. Many different fascinating and brilliant ideas displayed, if only slightly self-indulgent. Should be read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Don | 2/7/2010

    " Very experimental poetry. Very democratic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Renee | 2/28/2008

    " I read it in high school, and not since then; time to revisit. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paula | 5/23/2006

    " I love the naturalist feel this poem emanates. Like a lot of poetry, its meaning is directly correlated with one's perception. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Soha Sleem | 5/13/2006

    " I liked some parts of it but others were very boring "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andria Lynn Osler | 4/30/2006

    " I loved Whitman's ideas about life. This poem is very long but worth the read. It is shocking that this poem was written over 100 years ago. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kate | 1/5/2006

    " I don't understand why this needs to be 52 sections long! I have to admit I begun to skip through somethings after a point because he was just going on and on about how great America is. Yes, I get it, you love your country! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 12/4/2005

    " an epic poem of the body and the nature of self. a u.s. masterpiece - both breathtaking in craft and nightmarish when read as a cartography of white bodily freedom and poetically coded manifest destiny. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kendra | 2/14/2005

    " Much more intriguing the second time around I must say. He fully grasps the ephemeral nature of existence and makes no excuses for it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kelli | 9/13/2004

    " Stay as far away from this as you can!!!!! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anni | 4/28/2002

    " Some parts of it I get, some I don't.. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cait | 9/9/2001

    " Fantastic collection. As a part of the book, Leave of Grass, "Song of Myself" is wonderfully written allowing man to understand the poetic genius and the components of the natural universe in relation to the "triumph of art." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tina Gauthier | 8/11/2000

    " I read this in college and remember enjoying this. I would like to re-read this one! "

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